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Found 15 results

  1. Should be a popular one. Looks like they have timed and untimed tickets available on the Brooklyn Museum website. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving "Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s unique and immediately recognizable style was an integral part of her identity. Kahlo came to define herself through her ethnicity, disability, and politics, all of which were at the heart of her work. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the largest U.S. exhibition in ten years devoted to the iconic painter and the first in the United States to display a collection of her clothing and other personal possessions, which were rediscovered and inventoried in 2004 after being locked away since Kahlo’s death, in 1954. They are displayed alongside important paintings, drawings, and photographs from the celebrated Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of 20th Century Mexican Art, as well as related historical film and ephemera. To highlight the collecting interests of Kahlo and her husband, muralist Diego Rivera, works from our extensive holdings of Mesoamerican art are also included."
  2. The always popular orchid exhibit is back, taking over the Kogod Courtyard (!) Orchids: Amazing Adaptations Escape the winter cold and step into a floral oasis in the Kogod Courtyard with Orchids: Amazing Adaptations. A joint collaboration with SAAM, the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Gardens, and the U.S. Botanic Garden, this installation fills the museums’ courtyard with hundreds of orchids of stunning variety. Did you know that orchids are found on every continent except Antarctica? The gorgeous presentation showcases how orchids have adapted to their many different environments.
  3. For all you Tolkein/Lord of the Rings fans Tolkein: Maker of Middle-Earth " “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” With these words the Oxford professor J.R.R. Tolkien ignited a fervid spark in generations of readers. From the children’s classic The Hobbit to the epic The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien’s adventurous tales of hobbits and elves, dwarves and wizards have introduced millions to the rich history of Middle-earth. Going beyond literature, Tolkien’s Middle-earth is a world complete with its own languages and histories. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth celebrates the man and his creation. The exhibition will be the most extensive public display of original Tolkien material for several generations. Drawn from the collections of the Tolkien Archive at the Bodleian Library (Oxford), Marquette University Libraries (Milwaukee), the Morgan, and private lenders, the exhibition will include family photographs and memorabilia, Tolkien’s original illustrations, maps, draft manuscripts, and designs related to The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion."
  4. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse On view November 1, 2018 through April 28, 2019. "In the Hirshhorn’s largest interactive technology exhibition to date, three major installations from Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Pulse series will come together for the artist’s DC debut. A Mexican Canadian artist known for straddling the line between art, technology, and design, Lozano-Hemmer will fill the Museum’s entire Second Level with immersive environments that use heart-rate sensors to create kinetic and audiovisual experiences from visitors’ own biometric data. Over the course of six months, Pulse will animate the vital signs of hundreds of thousands of participants. With Lozano-Hemmer’s trademark sensitivities to audience engagement and architectural scale, each installation captures biometric signatures and visualizes them as repetitive sequences of flashing lights, panning soundscapes, rippling waves, and animated fingerprints. These intimate “portraits,” or “snapshots,” of electrical activity are then added to a live archive of prior recordings to create an environment of syncopated rhythms. At a time when biometry is increasingly used for identification and control, this data constitutes a new way of representing both anonymity and community. While reflecting on the upcoming exhibition, Hirshhorn Director Melissa Chiu offered the following: “Lozano-Hemmer will activate the Museum like never before…His hypnotic installations invite museum visitors to participate in a one-of-a-kind experience while addressing complex themes surrounding agency, mortality, and ownership.” The exhibition begins with Pulse Index (2010), which will be presented at its largest scale to date. The work records participants’ fingerprints at the same time as it detects their heart rates, displaying data from the last 10,000 users on a scaled grid of massive projections. The second work, Pulse Tank (2008), which premiered at Prospect.1, New Orleans Biennial, will be updated and expanded for this new exhibition. Sensors will turn your pulse into ripples on illuminated water tanks, creating ever-changing patterns that will be reflected on the gallery walls. Pulse Room (2006) rounds out the exhibition. The final installation features hundreds of clear, incandescent light bulbs hanging from the ceiling in even rows, pulsing with the heartbeats of past visitors. You can add your heartbeat to the installation by touching a sensor, which transmits your pulse to the first bulb. Additional heartbeats continue to register on the first bulb, advancing earlier recordings ahead one bulb at a time. The sound of the collected heartbeats will join the light display to amplify the physical impact of the installation. Six short documentaries of Pulse works will also be exhibited, showing the breadth of the series through video footage of various other biometric public-art interventions in Abu Dhabi, Toronto, Hobart, New York, and Urdaibai, Spain (2007–2015)."
  5. Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes On view November 8, 2018 through January 27, 2019 "The largest US museum survey of this pioneering artist to date, Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes features more than thirty large-scale paintings that reveal the artist’s considerable influence in the field of contemporary art. One of the most inventive artists working today, von Heyl has earned international acclaim for continually rethinking the possibilities of contemporary painting. Her cerebral yet deeply visceral artworks upend longstanding assumptions about composition, beauty, and narrative. Drawing inspiration from a vast and surprising array of sources—including literature, pop culture, metaphysics, and personal history—von Heyl creates paintings that are seemingly familiar yet impossible to classify, offering, in her words, “a new image that stands for itself as fact.” In studios in New York and Marfa, Texas, von Heyl combines a rigorous, process-based practice that demands each painting develop through the act of painting, itself. The spellbinding results invite you to explore a unique visual language, exuberant and insistent. Organized in collaboration with the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, this major multinational exhibition highlights the artist’s groundbreaking artistic output since 2005, including recent works that point to new developments in her constantly evolving practice. Together, Snake Eyes shines an international spotlight on one of today’s most dynamic painters and demonstrates the vitality and limitless possibilities of painting."
  6. For all the Rembrandt fans, should be a good one. Life in the Age of Rembrandt "On view exclusively at CMA, Life in the Age of Rembrandt is the first collaborative project stemming from an ongoing international partnership between CMA and the Dordrecht Museum, The Netherlands. The goal of this partnership is to celebrate the remarkable treasures of both museums while broadening perspectives and cultivating a global view of community. Life in the Age of Rembrandt showcases some 40 masterworks, many paired with a related object such as a print, a coin, Delft ware, or silver. Called the cradle of the Golden Age, Dordrecht is steeped in European Old World traditions, art, and history and is the oldest incorporated port city in Holland. Dordrecht Museum is one of the oldest and most important fine art museums in the country. Spanning over three centuries, Life in the Age of Rembrandt features 17th-century art from the Golden Age of Dutch painting, and concludes with works of The Hague School of the late 19th century. The Dutch Golden Age (17th century) was a period of great wealth for the Dutch Republic, including Dordrechts. As international trade blossomed, cities and citizens grew in wealth and prominence. The influence of the Golden Age is still visible in Dordrecht’s many mansions, canals, churches, city walls and harbors. Art and science blossomed during this time as well. The majority of works in Life in the Age of Rembrandt were executed in the 17th century or Northern Baroque period, during which time Dutch painting’s most famous master Rembrandt was active. In Dordrechts and elsewhere, 17th century Dutch art was a mirror of daily life in Holland. The so-called “little masters” specialized in specific types of subjects such as portraits, landscapes, still lifes, and genre scenes or depictions of everyday life. These paintings were owned by members of Holland’s prosperous middle class, and rarely included overtly religious subjects, since the dominant Calvinist faith in Holland prohibited images of Biblical figures in churches. However, secular paintings were often lled with hidden religious or moralizing meanings."
  7. Carolina Mayorga: PINK Ranchos and Other Ephemeral Zip Codes "The Organization of American States (OAS) AMA | Art Museum of the Americas proudly presents PINK Ranchos and Other Ephemeral Zip Codes, an exhibition of new work by Colombian-American artist Carolina Mayorga, in dialog with AMA’s permanent collection. Through this series of interconnected works, Mayorga invites the audience to enter a PINK-mented reality and experience her bi-cultural interpretations of those living inside ranchos, cambuches, shelters and other ephemeral zip codes. This site-specific multimedia project is the result of a year of artistic investigation on issues of home and homelessness and the artist’s infatuation with PINK. By applying the pigment to women and children (characters typically associated with home), memories of her native Colombia, 14 years of residency in Washington, DC and AMA’s permanent collection, she has created a pleasing environment to contrast the experiences of those living in exile, displacement, dislocation, relocation, and eviction."
  8. Zilia Sánchez: Soy Isla (I Am an Island) "The Phillips Collection presents the first museum retrospective of Cuban artist Zilia Sánchez (b. 1926, Havana). This long-overdue exhibition examines the artist’s prolific yet largely unknown career that spans almost 70 years, featuring more than 60 works including paintings, works on paper, shaped canvases, and sculptural pieces, alongside illustrations, design sketches, and ephemera. The exhibition traces Sánchez’s artistic journey from her early days in Cuba to her extended visits to Europe and residence in New York, and finally her move to Puerto Rico, where she now lives and works. Many of Sánchez’s works reference protagonists from ancient mythology (such as Trojans, Amazonians, and Antigone—all warriors and female heroines). Others have reoccurring motifs of lunar shapes, erotic topologies, and tattoo drawings that map physical and psychological spaces and add another dimension to her curvilinear geometry, rich with metaphorical meaning. The exhibition title, I Am an Island, serves as a personal metaphor for Sanchez's experience as an islander—connected to and disconnected from both the mainland and mainstream art currents."
  9. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975 How the Vietnam War changed American art "By the late 1960s, the United States was in pitched conflict both in Vietnam, against a foreign power, and at home—between Americans for and against the war, for and against the social status quo. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 presents art created amidst this turmoil—between the time of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s fateful decision to deploy U.S. ground troops to South Vietnam in 1965 and the fall of Saigon ten years later. Artists Respond brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists and artist groups of the period, including Asco, Corita Kent, Edward Kienholz, Rupert García, Leon Golub, Hans Haacke, David Hammons, Kim Jones, Yoko Ono, Martha Rosler, Carolee Schneemann and Nancy Spero. Galvanized by the moral urgency of the Vietnam War, these artists reimagined the goals and uses of art, affecting developments in multiple movements and media: painting, sculpture, printmaking, performance and body art, installation, documentary art and conceptualism. The exhibition presents an era in which artists endeavored to respond to the turbulent times and participated in a process of free and open questioning inherent to American civic life." Washington Post article
  10. Opening today at the Guggenheim, a two part, year-long exhibit of work by Robert Mapplethorpe. Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now January 25–July 10, 2019 July 24, 2019–January 5, 2020 "In the thirty years since his death, Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989) has become a cultural icon. One of the most critically acclaimed and controversial American artists of the late twentieth century, Mapplethorpe is widely known for daring imagery that deliberately transgresses social mores, and for the censorship debates that transpired around his work in the United States during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Yet the driving force behind his artistic ethos was an obsession with perfection that he bought to bear on his approach to each of his subjects. In 1993, the Guggenheim received a generous gift of approximately two hundred photographs and unique objects from the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, initiating the museum’s photography collection. Today, the Guggenheim celebrates the sustained legacy of the artist’s work with a yearlong exhibition program conceived in two sequential parts and presented in the museum’s Mapplethorpe Gallery on Tower Level 4. The first part of Implicit Tensions (January 25–July 10, 2019) features highlights from the Guggenheim’s in-depth Mapplethorpe holdings, including early Polaroids, collages, and mixed-media constructions; iconic, classicizing photographs of male and female nudes; floral still lifes; portraits of artists, celebrities, and acquaintances; explicit depictions of New York’s underground S&M scene; and searingly honest self-portraits. The second part of Implicit Tensions (July 24, 2019–January 5, 2020) will address Mapplethorpe’s complex legacy in the field of contemporary art. A focused selection of his photographs will be on view alongside works by artists in the Guggenheim’s collection, including Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Lyle Ashton Harris, Glenn Ligon, Zanele Muholi, Catherine Opie, and Paul Mpagi Sepuya. This exhibition is organized by Lauren Hinkson, Associate Curator, Collections, and Susan Thompson, Associate Curator, with Levi Prombaum, Curatorial Assistant, Collections."
  11. For those of you who follow Jim Carrey on Twitter you are well familiar with his brand of political art. He has been on a tear for the last couple of years. Now you can see some of the source drawings at Maccarone in DTLA. IndigNATION: Political Drawings by Jim Carrey, 2016-2018 on exhibit October 23 – December 1, 2018. From the press release:
  12. For all you Burners out there: No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man "Each year in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, a city of more than 75,000 people rises out of the dust for a single week. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected and many are ritually burned to the ground. The thriving temporary metropolis known as Burning Man is a hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its principles of radical self-expression, decommodification, communal participation, and reverence for the handmade. Both a cultural movement and an annual event, Burning Man remains one of the most influential phenomenons in contemporary American art and culture. No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man brings the large-scale, participatory work from this desert gathering to the nation’s capital for the first time. The exhibition takes over the entire Renwick Gallery building and surrounding neighborhood, bringing alive the maker culture and creative spirit of this cultural movement."
  13. I only just learned of this exhibit via an article in today's Washington Post. I recall the day and the TV coverage of the slow mournful movement of this train carry the slain Robert Kennedy from a service in NYC to Washington DC where he was laid to rest in Arlington Cemetery next to his brother. It was painfully breathtaking. Millions lined the train tracks from NY to DC all along the route, in every state and small hamlet. The scenes were haunting. It was a spontaneous response from people of all walks of life. The exhibit is running currently and through June 10 at San Francisco MOMA. I have no current plans to visit San Fran during this period but if I were I'd visit the museum and the exhibit. I hope this display travels to other museums. It was a mournful haunting moment in American history.
  14. For all you Hunter S. Thompson fans out there. or Flying Dog Brewery (apparently he illustrates their beer labels) Ralph Steadman: A Retrospective, Jun 16 - Aug 12, 2018: American University, Wash, DC "The retrospective showcases Steadman's legendary collaborations with maverick Gonzo journalist, Hunter S. Thompson; his illustrated literary classics such as Alice in Wonderland, Treasure Island; and the inventive books he authored such as I Leonardo and The Big I Am. There are also illustrations from his children's books, which include No Room to Swing a Cat and That's My Dad, plus artworks from his travels with Oddbins Wine Merchants and his iconic packaging for Flying Dog Brewery. As Thompson advised in the Steadman illustrated Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, "buy a ticket, take the ride."" Ralph Steadman's Website
  15. NMWA will have two concurrent shows that are closely related, featuring women artists from the Southwest. If you like Southwestern pottery and photography, get yourself to NMWA: New Ground: The Southwest of Maria Martinez and Laura Gilpin " Contemporaries and friends, potter Maria Martinez (ca. 1887–1980) and photographer Laura Gilpin (1891–1979) brought the American Southwest into focus as a culturally rich region that fostered artistic expression. Martinez’s bold adaptation of an ancient black-on-black pottery design technique reflected Pueblo artistic traditions and also appealed to the modernist sensibility. Gilpin was one of the first women to capture the landscape and peoples of the American West on film. Organized by the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this exhibition features 26 significant works by Martinez and 48 platinum, gelatin silver, and color print photographs by Gilpin. It explores the way these two artists worked from the 1930s to ’70s to shape the image of a modern Southwest."
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