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Found 9 results

  1. We stay at the Ashby Inn on a regular basis, and were there last weekend. It is far more casual than genteel, although there's a bit of that in horse country. Sitting on the balcony and listening to the cows lowing will quickly convince you that the city is not too close. They recently changed chefs, and have, at least for the moment, shortened the menu because of decreased dinner traffic in this stuttering economy, but the food remains wonderful. I know that they have an eight ounce filet listed, but believe that's the only steak offered. Note, too, that the Inn is quite close to the Sky Meadows State Park, which has very nice hiking trails and beautiful views. One of Paul Mellon's finest contributions to that part of the world.
  2. Chef Monnier comes from the late Arômes, and his latest venture brings his take on seasonal French bistro fare to the heart of Baltimore. I'm mostly a skeptic of Restaurant Week, but the dinner I had here last week was a tantalizing taste of what Chez Hugo offers. I started with a refreshing tomato gazpacho which was the right balance of sweet and tart, and paired nicely with a very good order of gougères. Next was a lamb murguez sausage, which was fantastic - tender, juicy, and spicy, with that unmistakable lamb flavor. This came on a bed of couscous with parsley, golden raisins, and a harissa yogurt sauce, unadventurous but a good complement to the sausage. Dessert was a poached peach on a sweet biscuit with vanilla ice cream which was just OK. Tastes of my companions dishes were mixed as well. The escargot appetizer and monkfish entree were very fresh, but a little too clean-tasting and could have used more aggressive seasoning. The steak frites and accompanying green peppercorn sauce were perfect, however. Overall, for a Restaurant Week meal I thought Chez Hugo did a good job of balancing a creative and affordable menu, and there were enough strong components that I'd like to come back to try them at their best.
  3. My sister-in-law, a denizen of Cleveland Park, asked me if I had heard anything about a new place called Ripple in the old Aroma space in Cleveland Park. She said the posted menu looks interesting. Metrocurean has the scoop. A bit surprised that this seems to have gone unnoticed on dr.com given the pedigrees of the team behind it. Anybody go on a scouting trip this past weekend? [ETA: oops--looks like the tag line got cut off in the title of the thread; should be "from our back yard." I assume Don will change the title of the thread anyway. ]
  4. I love this place. They serve some of the best ice cream I have ever had. It's made on the premises using milk from the owner's farm less than 5 miles away. Located at the intersection of 29 and 28, it's about an hour to get there from my farm or from DC proper. They also sell milk from the farm in old fashioned glass bottles as well as a small variety of sandwiches which I have yet to sample. My gf loves the lemon sorbet and my personal fave thus far is the "Moundz" ice cream- coconut with chocolate chips as you would expect. Parking is a bit limited and service does tend to be slow, particularly on weekend evenings when the weather is warm. I get a little chafed over it but the irritation goes away quickly when the ice cream hits the mouth. My family were dairy farmers for years and years so I have extra appreciation for the Moo Thru allowing the Smith family to endure in an increasingly difficult environment for dairy farming.
  5. http://www.flavormags.com/ Especially interesting is an article by Joel Salatin about his relationship with T&E meats, a small abbatoir in Harrisonburg. He talks about the dearth of small processing plants with no mention of Bev Eggleston. http://www.flavormag...TEMeatsAM09.pdf
  6. [These paragraphs were copied from The Mother Thread as part of larger posts. Use the Snapback Function (the little icon at the top-right of each entry) to view each post in its entirety.]
  7. If your from Philadelphia, or just know it well, you've probably heard of the White Dog Cafe in University city. A lovely and large townhome (200 seats), it is made intimate by it's many nooks and crannies and worn yet warm wooden floors. It's founder, owner and resident, Judy Wicks, has announced she is moving on and will turn the restaurant over. I'm posting this because even if you've never been there, you may be interested to learn about Ms. Wicks and her uncomprimising means of bringing food to your plate in the most ethical and earth- conscious ways possible. She has been a beacon for food sustainability, fair trade, eco-friendly practices and social responsibility for 24 years. The restaurant's mission has always been the aformentioned goals of Ms. Wicks, first and foremost. The food is second, but always solid. It's a wonderful overall experience though, and should be on travel agendas should you find yourself in the City of Brotherly Love. I'm looking forward to reaquainting myself (window table in the piano room)with the WDC when the new and hopefully more food driven leadership is in place. Meanwhile, I'll comfort myself with the cooking.
  8. Joe, it seems like you've found the reincarnation of the mysterious great restaurant somewhere in the boonies in New Jersey that no one else could find, that John McFee wrote about in The New Yorker years ago. Many came to believe that McFee made most of it up, but surely you've brought back a menu or matchbook--something tangible to prove that this place exists in more than a fever dream. Last weekend, we ate at a pleasant place called Radice in Blue Bell, not far from the retirement community where my MIL lives, in Gwynedd. I thought the mains were overpriced, but we were fine with a pizza for the table and small plates to follow. I had roasted sweetbreads, which were tasty but not anywhere in the league of Bibiana's hay-smoked version. And a braised octopus dish which was a good stand-in for the seafood stew I wanted but passed on due to the price. My vegetarian BIL was happy with his roasted artichoke, leek and potato gratin and his eggplant parmigiana, and J. had an unusual dish of breaded scallop cakes. I don't think I've ever eaten scallops that way (minced, seasoned, formed into a patty, rolled in crumbs and fried).
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