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Found 121 results

  1. Had lunch at Montmartre today on their little terrace and thoroughly enjoyed it. They have a braised paleron steak on the menu right now that's like beefy butter. It's even better than their onglet, and that's saying something. The iles flottantes were also as good as usual. I'm going to make an effort to get down there more.
  2. I don't think I'd consider Parc essential - especially given the proliferation of brasseries in DC. They do what they do very well, but if you're staying off Rittenhouse it's really better suited as an option for breakfast, lunch or (even better) a spontaneous glass of bubbles in the afternoon.
  3. In LA last week, I had an absolutely great dinner at Comme Ça [Closed in Jun, 2014] on North La Cienega. Every French bistro classic was on the menu. Bustling, loud and lots of fun.
  4. So Don, please move this where appropriate... Lunch at Bouley vs. Jean Georges Has anyone dined at Bouley recently? I'm not looking for the "best of the best" since I am limited by my many allergies. But Bouley used to be a very good place from what I've gathered online. As I posted in the JG thread, I have a feeling Jean Georges food may be better, but I am concerned about being really limited on what I can actually eat there. This is a big birthday celebration and I don't want to be terribly disappointed. My first choice was Le Bernardin, but I snoozed and am on the waiting list there. JG specifically said my choices would be limited, but did not define how so. I tried to get more info to qualify that statement but have not heard back yet and the reservation is for next week. This is what appealed to me on Bouley's website: "Please let us know of any special dietary or food preferences you may have- Chef Bouley works with his team to prepare tailored dishes for each guest before each seating. Just one of the reasons we will call to confirm your reservation!" Of course Bouley has my allergy list as well, but did not specify either way whether anything would be problematic. Please post if you have anything to offer re: Bouley; I guess I just want to make sure I am not making a big mistake by choosing it for my birthday lunch. According to a post a few years ago, Bouley had two Michelin stars vs. JG's three. If that is still true, I'm thinking any Michelin star restaurant is something I won't have an opportunity to experience too often in my life, and should stick with my Bouley reservation.
  5. According to Eater, this Shaw joint just opened. The head chef previously worked at Le Bernadin and Guy Savoy. Being super hip and cool, we will be checking out their early-bird specials soon.
  6. Chef Monnier comes from the late Arômes, and his latest venture brings his take on seasonal French bistro fare to the heart of Baltimore. I'm mostly a skeptic of Restaurant Week, but the dinner I had here last week was a tantalizing taste of what Chez Hugo offers. I started with a refreshing tomato gazpacho which was the right balance of sweet and tart, and paired nicely with a very good order of gougères. Next was a lamb murguez sausage, which was fantastic - tender, juicy, and spicy, with that unmistakable lamb flavor. This came on a bed of couscous with parsley, golden raisins, and a harissa yogurt sauce, unadventurous but a good complement to the sausage. Dessert was a poached peach on a sweet biscuit with vanilla ice cream which was just OK. Tastes of my companions dishes were mixed as well. The escargot appetizer and monkfish entree were very fresh, but a little too clean-tasting and could have used more aggressive seasoning. The steak frites and accompanying green peppercorn sauce were perfect, however. Overall, for a Restaurant Week meal I thought Chez Hugo did a good job of balancing a creative and affordable menu, and there were enough strong components that I'd like to come back to try them at their best.
  7. What, no thread on Belga? Dropped in last night with my brother and nabbed the last two seats at the bustling bar. Despite the frenzied atmosphere, our bartender provided us with calm, cool, and efficient service. We both had steaks-- he had the hanger with roasted potatoes, and I had the "Belga Steak" which was a filet with herbed butter and their killer frites. Both steaks were cooked perfectly and absolutely delicious. My only complaint would be that the menu should state that the "Belga Steak" is a filet mignon. I'm glad I ordered it, but I'm not typically a big fan of filet as I prefer the more flavorful cuts. If you haven't been yet, go!
  8. Silly website aside, I wonder if will be in the same league as his Provence, which was brilliant. Mashed potatoes with a ladle of rosemary-infused olive oil where the gravy goes....mmmmmmmmmmmm
  9. Cafe Tatti is a charming and quaint French Bistro located in a shopping center near Balducci's in McLean. I called around 2:30pm for a 6:30pm reservation on Monday night, and had no problem securing a table (not that I thought I would). When we arrived, we were seated at a two-top by the front window, a prime location, and the manager explained to me that they have a regular named Phillip, this is his table, and they weren't sure if the table was for him or not so they reserved it, and are glad to see it taken by another Phil. It was a nice, funny story (for which I'm not doing any justice) and a good introduction to the restaurant. Again, the restaurant is charming and quaint, with tiled archways, ceramics on the walls, other various artwork including many versions of a rooster which is the restaurants icon (of sorts), tablecloths and candles on the tables, formally attired wait staff. It describes itself as a French Bistro, but it has quite a few "Mediterranean" components to it as well. The staff, from top to bottom, provided excellent service throughout the meal (e.g. thoughtful suggestions, multiple unsolicited water refills, bread refills, checks on quality and taste, etc.). Prior to receiving our check, the manager came over with two (unasked for) shots of Amaretto (iirc), noting that on such a dreary day/evening (it had been raining all day and all night), a small digestif is the only response. It was very nice. Service started off with a small baguette, served warm, and was quite good. We ordered two glasses of the house Bordeaux, and were rewarded with hefty pours. For an appetizer, we had the Mussels Provencale, which was listed as a special that evening. We expected a pot of mussels that we'd have to work through, but instead were given a plate of mussels served open-faced (if you will) with the Provencale sauce added on top. I rather liked this presentation (much less fuss!), and the tomato sauce (tomatoes, chopped onion, garlic, among other ingredients) was very tasty. It wasn't ideal for bread-dipping, but we found a way. It was an ample portion split among two people. Entrees come with a Caesar salad (here, and example of the Mediterranean influence), amply and tastily dressed, topped by fresh ground pepper (if desired). For mains, we both got the Filet Au Poivre, which came with a side of roasted carrots and potatoes (these aren't mixed together). The steak was a large portion (the online menu says 7oz, which is probably accurate), and the gravy was delicious (with plenty for bread-dipping!). I didn't leave a bite. We got a slice of coconut cake and a slice of chocolate cake to go, and they were the only misses. I don't think these were made in-house, which is probably why. The cost was very reasonable, even considering we ordered wines by the glass (cheaper by the half liter or bottle), and both got the most expensive menu item. We look forward to retuning.
  10. From: The List, Are You On It. Christophe Poteaux, currently Executive Chef / Food & Beverage Director for Aquarelle at The Watergate, will open this new restaurant in Old Town Alexandria by September, featuring a moderately priced, modern French/Mediterranean cuisine with a blend of world ingredients. So does anyone know where and when this is going to open?
  11. After Jake's American Grille was quoting a 30-40 minute wait Saturday night with standing room only at the crowded bar, we hopped next door and had a very pleasant dinner at Terasol. Apparently Terasol was a short lived venture in Chevy Chase Arcade and after a two year search has re-opened at 5010 Connecticut Avenue (across the street from Politics and Prose). The front third of the space is an artisan gallery, selling locally produced pottery, jewelry, paintings photography, etc. The back two-thirds is a cafe serving up French bistro classics - onion soup, pate, quiches, ratatouille, boeuf bourguignon, roast chicken, to name a few dishes. The pate plate was two healthy slabs with a small pile of dressed greens, some sliced cornichons, and a little pot of grainy mustard. The quiche was light, fluffy, and quivering. The rataouille, served up in a medium sized souffle bowl, was luscious. Overall, the food made a very good first impression, perfect for a light lunch or dinner. Service was friendly and well meaning but a little hectic and confused. Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
  12. A girlfriend and I had dinner in the small dining room up a set of stairs from the entrance at Tersiguel's. Fernand knew me tangentally as a young customer who was in the hospitality industry and appreciative of his restaurant. We ordered a bottle of Chablis from the Les Clos vineyard (producer escapes me) and Fernand stopped by the table. His wife had been battling cancer, and he shared with us their struggles and fear; and that he had built a shrine to the Virgin Mary in his backyard in order to pray for his wife's health daily. The actual details of the conversation have faded over time, but the tone of the conversation, the immense love and devotion coupled with his intense fear and sense of loss, have not. His son had just taken over the helm of the kitchen, and he was so proud of that, despite his obvious pain. And that entire conversation occurred because of a bottle of wine. Got to get to Tersiguel's soon, too.
  13. Maybe I'm coming to the table late with this, but has anyone ventured that far south that they have gone to Pomme? Everything I have read: "Also, the opéra cake on the menu epitomizes what chef Gerard Gasparini is trying to do at Pomme. “My style is classic French cooking with a touch of the chef,” says the French native, “I try to cook things that you used to see on menus in French restaurants that French chefs don’t make anymore.” Style Weekly, Richmond, VA makes Pomme sound like a definite destination restaurant.
  14. It took some digging, but I independently confirmed that L'Hommage Bistro will be opening at 450 K Street NW, just east of Mount Vernon Square. The Chef de Cuisine will be Josh Perkins, who was most recently at Ecco in Atlanta - he has 25 years of experience in the industry. The Mâitre d' is named Mustafa Fairtout (I'm not sure about the spelling of Mustafa's last name), who was a Server at Cafe Milano. This will be a classical French bistro with onion soup, páté, steak frites, etc. The restaurant will seat 175 with 50 at the bar and 80 on the patio. Owner is Hakan Ilhan of Al Dente et al. A bakery will be attached to the bistro, selling French breads, sandwiches, coffee, and to-go meals - the bread will be made in-house. --- I was also sent this article: "Alba Osteria Owner Hakan Ilhan to Open French Restaurant in Mount Vernon Triangle" by Rebecca Cooper on bizjournals.com
  15. I had lunch at Cafe de la Presse, and aside from the prices, it was really good. It looks like an authentic French Bistro because it was built to look that way, and the wait staff all have French accents. I can't remember dining in any place like this since I was in France about three decades ago. The food was good. I had the Salade Niçoise, which was one of the best renditions I've eaten, but at $21 it's one of the more economic options on the menu. Steak Frites comes in at $31, and Confit de Canard at $34 -- these are lunch prices -- so bring a hefty expense account with you. My companions had the lamb stew (very good) and the daily seafood special (good). The positives are the authenticity and the quality of the dishes. The negatives are the prices and, well, if you're outside the Chinatown gate in San Francisco, why eat French? On the other hand, if you're in San Francisco and you absolutely have to eat at a French Bistro, you don't have to fly to France.
  16. I heard from an inside source today that Stephen Starr's restaurant group has signed a lease for the old Q Street Cleaners space at 1601 14th St. NW, and it's going to become a Buddakan. Confidence level? Since I'm relying on a source for this (as opposed to hearing it with my own ears), it can't be 100%, but it's up there.
  17. I eat here with some regularity and keep coming back because they do all the standards well, have an experienced and friendly staff, good parking, a very good wine list and reasonable prices. A good choice for a bustling neighborhood bistro. The table under the stairs is a nice, quiet private spot.
  18. "L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon may be the world’s most expensive restaurant chain." Ouch. I don't know what stings more - that line or the two star rating. "A New Link in the World's Most Expensive Restaurant Chain" by Pete Wells on nytimes.com
  19. According to OpenTable, Central Michel Richard is accepting reservations for the 29th of January.
  20. At 1000yregg's urging, we booked a dinner last weekend at Arí´mes, a new spot in Hampden that just opened a couple of weeks ago. Chef Monnier hails from Reims with a résumé that stands on classic haute cuisine spots in Paris and LA, but has chosen to open his small (24-ish seat) operation in a converted rowhouse, specializing in seasonal and local ingredients. Dinner is a prix fixe affair of six courses for $65, or three for $45. Four of the courses are smaller bites to precede the main course, and then you proceed to dessert. Because of the ever-changing menu, it's somewhat academic to repeat what we had, but each course's description sounded simple, unexpected, and maybe even opportunistic, and yet each time what arrived was remarkably integrated, and much more than the sum of its parts to the extent that each component became essential. Also evident was a high degree of technique and care in the preparation. I'm only going to describe a few of our courses, but there wasn't a dud in the bunch. "Beets, umeboshi, pear jam, and lucky plum" combined soft and crisp textures in a small composition of fleshy fruits and root vegetables, plated with a flourish of beet ash. It cleansed the palate for the next course, a little taste of "risotto and scallop chicharrones with Old Bay mayo". I don't know how they struck upon the idea of making chicharrones out of large thin curls of good scallops, but its compelling and concentrated umami was almost unreal, and a worthy match for a few bites of perfectly toothy risotto. The "oyster with green apple and sorrel" was a single oyster on a bed of rock salt, topped with a foam (the only appearance of modernist technique all evening) so you breathed its flavor as much as you tasted it. This course was a bit precious, but whatever oyster they used (it wasn't indicated) was beautifully clean and deeply cupped, almost like a kusshi, which makes me really curious where it's coming from in this region? The chalkboard near the front window held only thank-yous to a number of their suppliers: Vent Coffee Roasters (excellent, btw), Trickling Springs Creamery, Lancaster Farm Fresh Coop, Two Boots Farm, Baltimore Organic Farm, and Liberty Delight Farm. It's not a place for wildly crowd-pleasing dishes like Rose's, and to be honest I think a picky eater wouldn't have enjoyed all of these dishes, nor the menu format. But if our meal was any indication, Aromes is worth the serious diner's consideration, and worth the trip.
  21. Ericandblueboy

    Alhambra in DC

    Website https://www.alhambradc.com/ I saw this place on Open Table. Seems expensive and swanky.
  22. The Guards became Rialto which is now Maxime, under the same ownership as Rialto (via Washington City Paper). Maxine opened on March 26, 2015 (via Washingtonian).
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