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Found 23 results

  1. On my previous visit to Fremont Diner in Sonoma, I had what must surely be the greatest breakfast food I've ever eaten (major bonus: It's served all day long). Last night, my friend and I hit it up for an early dinner, and unlike last time when we sat on the patio, we opted to sit in the ridiculously charismatic indoor portion of the restaurant, just outside of the bar and kitchen area. Our server was terrific, and was an extrapolation of the restaurant as a whole - as casual as anyone could be (she literally got up on a chair right at our table and changed light bulbs), but it all fit in perfectly with the charming atmosphere of this amazing restaurant, which is putting out food as good *and as serious* as any restaurant in Sonoma, despite the "weathered" look of the menus: My friend got a glass of the Gloria Ferrer Brut Sparkling Wine ($8.99, served in a Mason jar), and I had a glorious mug (or two) of the Ruhstaller "1881 Sacramento" Red Ale ($5.99 for a large, thick, 16-20 ounce mug - I felt like I was back in Munich). For dinner, you can pretty much throw darts at the menu here and hit a bulls-eye, and my advice is to order whatever "reads" the best or appeals to you at the moment. I love Chicken-Fried Steak ($15.99), and so I got it - it came topped with some of the best sausage gravy you'll ever eat, some amazing Sprouting Broccoli (we must remember, we're in California) and a Sunnyside-Up Fried Egg on top. It was everything you could ever hope for with this dish, and as good as any rendition I've had in my life - a couple squirts of their housemade pepper-vinegar sauce on my sprouting broccoli, and my plate went from exceptional to perfect, and I didn't want the meal to end. Fremont Diner takes barbecue very seriously, and you should pay attention to whatever they say is in the "Pit" that day. My friend got an off-menu pit special of a Pulled Pork Sandwich ($12.99) with baked beans, and topped with slaw and pickles on a brioche bun. I have now had so many "bad-to-ordinary" pulled-pork sandwiches in a row (dozens) that I couldn't imagine why she ordered this, but everything became clear as day when I nabbed a single morsel of pork: revelatory. Then a pickle: shockingly wonderful. This was the pulled-pork sandwich that Zeus would order for Hera, and the only thing that could have been improved upon is that the beans could have been cooked a little longer, as they were still a little tough, and they also benefitted from some housemade barbecue sauce and a couple shakes of that pepper-vinegar sauce that I had. Other than that one blip, it was the ultimate pulled-pork sandwich, and qualified in every regard as "real barbecue" that even the most jaded pitmaster would respect. We were full, but there was *no way* we were stopping here: We bought a Bucket of Biscuits ($3.99) with rhubarb jam for breakfast, a Pound of Brisket ($24.00, also an off-menu pit special) for lunch, and planned our trip to the Ruhstaller micro-brewery near Sacramento the next afternoon, courtesy of our gracious server's recommendation. It was, in every regard, a perfect meal - the type of meal that conjures up your fondest recollections of that lobster pound in Maine, or that little unknown restaurant you wandered into somewhere in New Orleans. If you're anywhere near Sonoma County - and I mean anywhere within an hour - make a detour to the Fremont Diner, one of the greatest restaurants in the Napa-Sonoma region.
  2. I read the NY Times article that I'll link below a couple of months ago and was curious to see how Bon Chon chicken tasted like and to my surprise a Bon Chicken store opened up inside the new Lotte Plaza Int'l supermarket in Germantown. I looked around their website and it looks a new one is also opening up in Annandale [this link has the new location] on 7/15. Anyhow, if you happened to be up in Germantown, I highly recommend you try this korean-style fried chicken. It has a very light flaky skin and juicy meat that tastes wonderful. They have two flavors, soy garlic and a spicy variation. Both my wife and I were partially to the spicy one. The pieces of chicken are available in drumsticks or wings and come with a radish side dish that some korean restaurants serve as a pan-chan. Feb 7, 2007 - "Koreans Share Their Secret for Chicken with a Crunch" by Julia Moskin on nytimes.com
  3. We've been going to Rintaro for a while now and are considered regulars. They've been serving lunch for several months. B and I had put that on our list but for some reason, plans kept going awry....that is, until today. Japanese fried chicken wings with smokey tare, sansho pepper and wasabi arugula. There is some really stellar, excellent frying in the kitchen. The chicken was marinated and coated in a crispy, flavorful shell that literally melted in our mouths. Berkshire pork gyoza, chicken foot jelly. The "lace" shows you how light the batter is. Hand-rolled udon, with two fishes broth, tenkasu (deep-fried flour batter) and hot spring egg. The covered pot contains togarashi pepper and gomashio (sesame salt). Kaisen mori-don. Clockwise from center: chopped California big eye tuna, wild striped bass and kombu-cured halibut over Japanese rice with nori, tamago (egg omelette) and shiso; soy sauce; wasabi leaf pickle, narazuke (traditional pickles from the Nara region of Japan) and senmaizuke (a traditional pickle originally from Kyoto, made from turnips); carrot and daikon radish pickle; Tokyo turnips and scallions in mustard-miso; marinated cucumbers in rice vinegar with black cod; miso soup with shimeji and maitake mushrooms. Total bill came out to $95 (with 20% tax and tip). Rintaro82 14th Street (Folsom Street)South of Market http://izakayarintaro.com/ Medium article from April 2015 SF Chronicle reviews (for those of you who like Michael Bauer; personally I detest him, but variety is what makes the world go round): Original Review and Follow-Up Review from Last Year
  4. Liberty Barbecue, the newest enterprise of the Liberty Tavern/Lyon Hall/Northside Social folks, had its Grand opening last night in Falls Church. Located In the space most recently occupied by Famous Daves on Broad Street. The schedule for the rest of December is unclear, but they say in January they will be serving both lunch and dinner 7 days a week. Full bar with a small but adequate wine list, and, of course, a nice selection of beer. Wi-Fi is also provided. I had a quarter slab of ribs which were very meaty, perfectly cooked, but could have used a touch more smoke. The sauces need some work -- appeared to be commercial rather than house made. They had a band, but I didn't stick around to hear the music (I arrived at 5 when the doors opened, and the music wasn't starting til 9 -- call me a light-weight, but I had to go home). The place is totally concrete so if you're sensitive to noise, better bring ear-plugs. All-in-all this is a welcome addition to central Falls Church, and I expect they will have as much success as their other ventures have enjoyed. Wishing the best of luck in the New Year!
  5. There's a spot in a Centreville where restaurants go to die. After two Indian places met their maker comes a new contender. Frito Chicken. The place has an interesting story: Mar 15, 2018 - "Frito Chicken Gives Ashburn New Fried Chicken Option" by Chris Wadsworth on theburn.com My wife met the owner yesterday who invited us to give it a try. She was very nice and we didn't feel like making dinner tonight so we gave it a try. "Frito Chicken is the brain child of Amina Khan. She’s was born in Pakistan, raised in Canada and has collected a wealth of recipes. Over the years, friends have told Khan that her chicken recipes — both fried and roasted — are some of the best they’ve ever had." We got the strips which were spicy and an 8 piece chicken. The yuca was all done perfectly. The potatoes and corn were fine. The fried chicken is the star here and I urge everyone to give it a try. Remember, it takes 20 minutes for it to cook so be patient. It is worth it.
  6. Had a delicious lunch today during my first visit to Bom on 18th st in the heart of Adams Morgan. It has a rather large menu for a korean-fried chicken place with a similar menu to the BonChon chain plus a bunch of other appetizers and entrees and sides (sides may be identical to BonChon). The food is legit tasty. We started with pickled radish and kimchi. The friendly waiter asked whether we preferred fresh or old/sour kimichi and when we couldn't decide he brought both. Both were very good - I liked the fresh one better while my friend enjoyed the more sour/funky one better. Next we were served a large stone bowl of bibimbap while we waited for our wings. The bibimbap had a nice over easy egg in the middle surrounded by a mix of fresh veggies and our choice of protein - spicy chicken (there are 3-4 other choices including a vegetarian option). It was very flavorful served with gochujang spicy sauce on the side. It was ample for 2 to share or would make a whole hefty meal for one. Very fresh and well made - the stone bowl was great to get the crispy rice on the bottom. Finally our wings arrives - we got a mix of wings and 2 drumsticks - half spicy and half soy. Very similar to BonChon and equally yummy. The spicy had some real heat but an enjoyable amount, not melt your face spicy. They also have an ongoing 20% dine-in deal because I guess they get a lot of carryout. It was mostly empty during lunch. I will say the decor was an interesting mix - they have a clubbish bar, then a ton of TVs like a sports bar, and then a bunch of tables for more of a sitdown restaurant vibe. Regardless, we both thought the food was great and a good price for the neighborhood. We plan to add it to the lunch rotation.
  7. FWIW, I just noticed today that they've opened a location in College Park on Rt 1 about two blocks north of the UMCP main gate. (On a related note...when did gentrification hit Hyattsville?!)
  8. Your reference to Boss Shepherd's made me realize (to my surprise) that we had no thread for Fried Chicken. I think people are always up to hear about who is currently doing a good job with this American classic. So let me begin by throwing one out for you: Hong Kong Palace. Sheila: "Did he say 'Hong Kong Palace?'" Carla: "I think he did!" The other evening, I ordered the Fried Chicken with Spicy Potato ($11.95, item C19 on their carryout menu), and got some of the best fried chicken I've had in a long, long time. Cut into bite-sized morsels and served mixed in with bite-sized cubes of potato, this is a spicy dish, but not excessively spicy, and not oily in the least - in fact, it's quite dry in terms of presentation, and that's exactly the way you want it. The chicken itself was about as perfect as fried chicken can be - with wonderful seasoning and a perfect chew (dare I say it's toothsome?) - and most of the spice lies in the potato rub which you can eat around (but you won't want to). Try this dish, and you'll be both shocked and addicted. If you want a well-balanced meal, add a green; if you want great fried chicken, this will do you. --- [The following posts have been split into separate threads: Blue & White Carryout (Hunter)]
  9. Surprised that there was no thread here, but I guess most of the prior discussion occurred on The Other Boards. I had lunch on Sunday at the one in Wheaton, and have now been to all four area locations. The chicken had balanced flavors spice-wise, but was not as juicy as I remembered. The beans and plantains were great as usual. Rice and tortillas, not so much. And their horchata is better than the tamarindo. My favorite location is still the one in Bailey's Crossroads. Apparently, there is one opening at Lakeforest Mall in Gaithersburg next month. Having grown up in Montgomery Village, I suspect it will do quite well. There will also be one in Columbia Heights, but I don't know about its timetable. Although the comparison is largely apples/oranges, Popeye's still has better chicken IMO (and larger pieces) but Pollo Campero provides the better overall meal once you factor in the sides.
  10. I will be taking the Executive Chef role at Barrel and Crow in Bethesda. We plan to offer regional American food mostly in the the $18 to $24 range for dinner, along with a couple items in the $30 range. We are looking to be a great neighborhood restaurant for people to come to and enjoy some great comforting food and drink, at a decent price point. We are hoping to open in about 4 weeks with a little luck. I have attached a sample of the opening dinner menu, still haven't tested everything yet so there could be some small changes. Barrel and Crow Opening Dinner Menu.pdf
  11. I couldn't find a previous thread on KFC, but reports of their new sandwich, the Double Down, nearly made me lose my breakfast: "KFC is now offering a "sandwich" which consists of bacon, two kinds of cheeses and sauce between two pieces of fried chicken. That's right, fried chicken as a bun instead of bread." Points for creativity, I guess. Who's up for a lunch outing when this thing shows up?
  12. Crisfield's, the previous inhabitant in the Lee building, has long had the best pan fried chicken in the D. C. area. You can still get their's at the original near the viaduct at Georgia and East West highway. It would be interesting to compare it to Ray's.
  13. Federal Donuts is the doughnut, coffee, and fried chicken place from chef Michael Solomonov and his business partner, Steven Cook (Zahav, Abe Fisher, Dizengoff, Percy Street Barbecue). Federal has four locations, plus a stand in Citizen's Bank Park. We went to the Center City location and only got the doughnuts, but they were excellent. Federal only serves cake doughnuts, and this location had six rotating varieties of pre-made "fancy donuts" and three sugar coated ones that were cooked to order (or, at least, served hot). All of the doughnuts except the chocolate use the same batter, so the primary difference is the topping/coating. Here's a story about the chicken, which also talks a little more about the doughnuts.
  14. This week starts the soft open of Astro Doughnuts... they are open from 8am to sold out, which apparently only took 90 minutes this morning. They reopened at noon with limited doughnuts and buttermilk fried chicken. I did not attempt to go get doughnuts today. Astro Doughnuts 1308 G Street, NW Washington DC 20005
  15. Don encouraged me to start a "mini-blog" about the search for my favorite chicken dish 炸å­é›ž. It generally translates to crispy fried chicken but literally means "fried young chicken." It looks like this. This is a popular dish in NY Chinatown but hard to find here. Years ago, my mother wrote down the Chinese characters so I could show it to the waiter because on menus it can be called many things in English. Also, different waiters speak different dialects so verbalizing it in my own dialect could get me nowhere. A couple of years ago, I flashed the characters asked at Full Kee. At that time, they said they could make it if I ordered it a day in advance. This is not surprising in a non-Chinatown restaurant because the prep is not trivial. Check out this video. Now I understand how the meat can be juicy and succulent yet sport a delicious crispy skin. My quest is to find and try out this dish in NoVa. Candidates to explore so far include China Wok, Lotus Garden, Mark's Duck House, XO Taste as well as what will be my starting point, Full Kee. I will keep you posted on my 炸å­é›ž experiences.
  16. Bonchon Chicken, a Korean Fried Chicken (KFC) franchise, is coming to Philadelphia. I suspect Philadelphians will immediately fall in love with the eternally crispy skin, and that the novelty will wear thin after enough time goes by. The quality of some of the Bonchon franchises has slipped here in the the Washington, DC area (here's the Washington, DC thread if you want to get some historical background). Nevertheless, it really is unlike anything you've ever tried before - they double-fry it in a super wok (I think), and the chicken stays hot and crispy for over thirty minutes (actually it stays crispy for much longer than that). You can get a double-mix of drummies and wings, and soy-garlic and hot chili sauce - I've always found the wings with soy-garlic to be the best combination - the drumsticks (the actual chicken) have really changed in quality and size (they are now nuclear-sized) over the past couple of years. "Update on BonChon Korean Fried Chicken" by Arthur Etchells on phillymag.com This will have multiple locations in Philadelphia before you know it. "Bonchon" means "my hometown," by the way.
  17. Ellicott City Has been open a little while, they do not have a liquor license yet, but they happily allow BYO
  18. The Marshall diner is off I-66 in Marshall Virginia on west Main Street, not very far from highway, I have eaten there once when I picked up my puppy and again on the way down to Al. The fried chicken is pretty fantastic, crispy and juicy with a bit of sweetness. It's comes with 3-4 pieces 2 sides and a roll and I'm pretty sure it was under 10 bucks. Another time I had a perfectly cooked over easy egg plate with home fries and sausage all good. It's a nice little place to stop on a road trip.
  19. One of my favorite elements of living in Williamsburg is Pies-n-Thighs. My typical order is a chicken biscuit (fried chicken cutlet served on a biscuit dripping with honey butter and hot sauce) with mac & cheese (more hot sauce). Of the signature pies, so far my favorite is banana cream. A neighborhood gem and killer of cholesterol test results.
  20. The Annandale Bon Chon location is now called Chi Mc, and is almost *exactly* the same as Bon Chon was, with slightly better service and (I think) a few more options to choose from. Matt "took me" there for Father's Day (he *loves* chicken wings), and it was wonderful - everything Bon Chon ever was, and perhaps more. I phoned my order in at 4:35, and they said it'd be ready at 5:10 (we ate in). They said they were out of drummies, so we got one Large Wings and a bottle of ShoChu ($33.95) and one Medium Wings ($14) - I can't find the receipt, so I'm going from memory here. We ordered them both half soy-garlic and half spicy, and plenty of drumsticks did appear after all. After receiving the shochu, and a large, thin, (temperature)-hot bowl of tofu-onion-soy soup, and two bowls of chilled, pickled radish cubes (the perfect chaser to the spicy chicken) - the chicken came, and it was virtually identical to Bon Chon's. It met our expectations and more. Matt flubbed a piano recital, and drowned his sorrows in chicken wings this evening - as a dear friend told me, "chicken wings are a unifying force of nature," and she's right. We had a fantastic time - thanks, Matt! Initialized strongly in Italic.
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