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Found 79 results

  1. I think I'm going to like the concept. An accomplished foreign chef, like Jose Andres (or Jacques Pepin) comes to America and falls in love with our regional ingredients and traditions, and then gives them center stage with a slight uplifting from his culinary heritage. I'm going to like this a lot....
  2. (Full disclosure #1 - my +1 was directly affliated with Paolo's a while ago, and is still with CRC...) Have eaten here a bazillion times, but I have to say my favorite dish I had late night (11:27... ) last night and was unbelievably good, it's the Minestrone and for 5.95 wow (oh and you can get half orders too). Starting - it could be a full meal, I mean huge!, but more importantly the flavor, I was full, but the flavor was so good I had to keep eating. First off it's truely a made to order dish. Second everything is little tiny bites, zuch, pot, mini tubes of pasta etc, except the spinach and cheese that you swirl around. What I really loved was the broth, chicken stock base so not entirely vegetarian...(my +1 said the broth has sometimes been "richer") whatever it was awesome, I know there is some chili oil in it, the broth packs a bit of heat. (Full disclosure #2, my +1 may have, okay did, "had a hand" in this recipe, but that is not why I recommend it, actually you might realize I am p** this was the first time in 1 1/2 years I tried it!) Anyway if you are in georgetown, I'd definitely give this minestrone a try.
  3. Finally, the danger to wallet and waist size expands down the coast to our fair city. Eater had reported in late February that an opening was planned for late April or early May. According to their Twitter feed, the Boston location opened in early May, but no updates have mentioned DC since their preview at the annual Sakura Matsuri festival. Can anybody around Georgetown glean an update for us?
  4. Stachowski Charcuterie sales and pick up for orders Tomorrow Sunday December 21 from 12-2 p.m. Meet me on Pershing drive in the parking lot near the intersection of Route 50 in Arlington. I will have Christmas Boudin flavored with cardamom and ginger 12/lb Venison Pate 19.5/lb Country Pate 10.50/lb Rabbit Terrine 13.65/lb Fresh Kielbasa 5.53/lb I will be driving a junkie trooper. The password is chacha. ---- [Editor's note: Click down to Post #92 (May 1, 2012) for the opening of Stachowski Market and Deli. Congratulations, Jamie! Cheers, Rocks]
  5. "This is it," I thought to myself. "This is the best taco I've ever eaten in my life." I had read about the lines at farmer's markets for Suzanne Simon and Bettina Stern's taco stand, but didn't really know much about it. The other day, I decided to go see for myself, and I am *so glad* I found out early on about Chaia. First, the location: Chaia is on Grace Street, which is just a few feet off of Wisconsin Avenue in Georgetown, south of Georgetown Park Mall - it's *right there* off Wisconsin, and even has a little sign directing pedestrians to "tacos and beer" - don't let the words fool you. Having read their website before I went, I had a pretty good idea of what I was in for, and I also had a pretty good idea of what I was going to order. One thing of great importance: Chaia is a daytime-only taqueria: Tuesdays through Saturdays it closes at 8PM, and on Sundays, it closes at 6PM - it's closed altogether on Mondays. Please don't forget this, or you're going to show up and find a closed taqueria. And they serve beer, too - in keeping with their "hyper-local" theme, the two breweries they sell are Port City Brewing and Atlas Brew Works. Don't make the same mistake I did: Donnie Boy just *had* to have a beer with his tacos, and for no particular reason, so I started off with a plastic cup of Atlas Brew Works Rowdy Rye ($5). Why in God's name I did this, I don't know - Chaia sells cold-pressed juice from Misfit Juicery and seasonal shrubs, and non-alcoholic beverages are what you should be paying attention to here, unless you *really* like hop-laden beers at the opportunity cost of something truly special. Read on for another reason not to succumb to the temptation of ordering a beer. I got the Market Trio ($11), saving all of twenty-five cents from the í la carte taco prices of $3.75. You should ignore this special, and order however many tacos you want, and get whatever sounds good. Still, three tacos were just about right for me, and gave me a chance to try three different versions, the top three on the list: 1) Mushroom with feta, red sauce, and cilantro 2) Smoky Collards with queso cotija, tomatillo salsa, and pickled radish 3) Creamy Kale + Potato with pepperjack, polano crema, green sauce, and pickled onions. On this one taco, I sprung for a fried, pasture-raised egg ($1.50, available weekends only) - I'm a sucker for eggs and potatoes together, since they conjure up memories of diner breakfasts. I'd gotten my beer first, and nursed it throughout the meal. Note that you're not allowed to go out on the patio if you order beer, so if you want to eat outside, keep it non-alcoholic. Wanting to enjoy the egg while it was hot and runny, I ate my tacos in the order 3), 1), 2), and as I was about one-third of the way into the Kale and Potato taco, I paused, and said to myself, "My God, this is the single greatest taco I've ever eaten." I know it's California-style, and that it's vegetarian, but I don't care - this was not only the best taco I've ever eaten, it was the best quick-serve food I've ever eaten (think what that's saying). The corn tortillas are unbelievable, and the combination of ingredients on this taco was perfect. Do yourself a favor and *get the egg* with this - I could not believe what I was eating, and even cheated a little bit by dripping some of the egg yolk onto the other two tacos (only a few drops, as I didn't want to flirt with ruining perfection). Read that previous paragraph as many times as you need to read it - get this taco, and get it with an egg. In fact, get *three* of these tacos, and get *each one* with an egg. It'll set you back $15.50, and you'll love yourself (and me!) forever and ever. The Mushroom taco was next up, and it was fantastic as well, with thinly sliced mushrooms that picked up everything because they were so thin. A few days ago, I complimented the Wild Mushroom Taco at Virtue Feed & Grain - allow me to paraphrase my dear friend Terry Theise: 'I like tortilla chips, and I like truffles, and I also have no problem recognizing which of the two is better.' It's the same situation here: Virtue's Wild Mushroom Taco was tasty bar food; Chaia's Mushroom Taco was a great and profound taco by taqueria standards - there's a huge difference between the two, and if you like mushrooms, get over here and order this - it would also be terrific with an egg. Then came the collards, and this is why I should have gotten a cold-pressed juice: the collards are, by nature, bitter, and the rye-based beer was loaded with bitter hops - it was bitter on bitter, and literally left me with a bitter taste in my mouth, even as I was driving over the Memorial Bridge to get home it was still there, in a pronounced way. This is a *very* collard-greenish taco, and you have to really love collard greens to love this (think about the collard greens you get at barbecue shacks, without any of the pork they usually put in them). I'm not saying 'don't order this,' merely that you should be prepared for a blast of collard greens, and if that's what you're in the mood for, then you'll really enjoy it. As a boxed set, for $11, this was a fantastic meal, and I cannot recommend Chaia enough, both for vegetarians, and also for lovers of California (San Francisco, not Los Angeles) taquerias. This food was fantastic, and I contend that the first taco was the single greatest taco I've ever eaten in my life. I don't like putting pictures into my reviews, because I think it's lazy, and ruins the surprise for the reader when they get to the restaurant. However, in this case I'm going to make an exception, because this food is so beautiful, and tastes so good, that you'll be surprised no matter what I publish. Here you go: Enjoy your meal, and thank me later. Chaia is strongly initialized in Italic, and is one of the very greatest taquerias this city has ever known. It's also quite possibly the best quick-serve restaurant in DC, and happens to be the only one currently run by women. You're going to love this place.
  6. NEW ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT FIOLA MARE SIGNS 15 YEAR LEASE AT MRP REALTY PROPERTY WASHINGTON HARBOUR Washington, D.C., February 26, 2013 "“ MRP Realty, a real estate operating company, today announced that Fiola Mare signed a 15 year lease for 9,000 square feet at 3050 K St., NW (Washington Harbour) in Washington, D.C. The Class-A space will be will be an Italian seafood concept owned by restaurateur Fabio Trabocchi. Fiola Mare is expected to open by end of 2013. "Fiola Mare will be exceptional complement to the restaurant tenant mix we have at Washington Harbour," said Bob Murphy, managing principal of MRP Realty. "Having recently completed a significant renovation project at Washington Harbour, Fiola Mare will add to the level of sophistication that we are bringing to our tenants, residents and the community." Recent renovations at Washington Harbour include: extensive upgrades to the upper and lower level plazas with fully renovated fountains, specialized lighting and animated water jets during the warm weather and the addition of an approximately 12,000 square feet ice rink during the winter months. Additionally, the retail storefronts have been substantially replaced on both plaza levels and a new 3,200 square feet state of the art fitness center has opened with onsite personal trainers and renovated lobbies, elevators and bathrooms. John Asadoorian of Asadoorian Retail Solutions represented MRP Realty during the transaction. MRP Realty acquired the Washington Harbour property two years ago. About MRP Realty Founded in 2005, MidAtlantic Realty Partners, LLC ("MRP Realty") is a real estate operating company focused on the Washington DC metropolitan area. MRP provides a full array of real estate services including acquisition/disposition, development/construction management, property management and asset management services. MRP Realty's senior leadership team has worked together in Washington, D.C. and its surrounding market area in various capacities for periods ranging from eight to 25 years and has wide ranging experience across a multitude of product types in both urban and suburban settings. MRP Realty's managing members have been involved in over 20 million square feet of investment with a total capitalization in excess of $4 billion in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.
  7. Found this neat little coffee shop in Georgetown. Very small and almost hidden. No parking. Very modern feel to the shop - very light and airy. I didn't have the coffee. I had the iced tea and it was fresh brewed to order. People in the shop said the coffee is fantastic, that it has almost a cult following. Blue Bottle Coffee
  8. I stopped into Old Glory today for lunch for the first time in a long while. Normally loud and mobbed, it was peaceful and less loud today. I completely forgot how good and honest the food is. A big bowl of chili with all the extras and a sliced brisket sandwich hit the spot perfectly on this lousy, cold and rainy day. I had to stop myself from over-ordering because so many things looked appealing. Based on what I had, plus the pleasant and quick service, I'll be going back soon.
  9. A few weeks ago, I had an opportunity to attend a soft-opening for Il Canale in Georgetown. The restaurant is officially open now, but after searching this Forum I didn't see a mention of it. The restaurant features "2Amy" style pizzas made from a large brick pizza oven right near the main entrance. But it also has a menu of finer Italian food (with prices to match). My entree was the Bronzino in parchment, which was voted one of the best by our table. There were mixed impressions of other entrees. A seafood risotto was loved by some but found too salty by others. Two of our companions had steak, one filet and one rib eye. Both appeared to be well done and were enjoyed by those who ordered them. I had a piece of the rib eye and found it good but not remarkable. The wine list was still a work in progress at the time of my visit. If anyone's been there since the full opening perhaps they can share their thoughts. The service was a bit slow, but consistent with what I've seen at other soft openings. The waiting was made more than bearable though by house made bread which was fresh and warm (even at 9pm) and served with olive oil infused with roasted garlic and rosemary.
  10. So did Pier 2934 on the corner of 30th and M. It was a great place for one pound bags of steamed seafood. Especially Alaskan king crab.
  11. The Guards became Rialto which is now Maxime, under the same ownership as Rialto (via Washington City Paper). Maxine opened on March 26, 2015 (via Washingtonian).
  12. So I'm sitting at Teatro Goldoni the other evening, watching someone eat the largest cheeseburger I've ever seen, and in walk couple-about-town Fellato Riminovich and Putana Harlotski. They ordered some bruschetta, wolfed it down hungrily, blew some air kisses, and then disappeared into the night. And I thought about a conversation I once had. "You're too much of a foodie," my friend once told me, shortly before heading to her shift at Cafe Milano. "I am not," I protested. "I just don't like things that suck." "Cafe Milano doesn't suck." "It does suck." "You need to understand: bars and restaurants aren't always about food." "How can a restaurant not be about food?" "It's no Tosca, but people enjoy it." "People enjoy Cheesecake Factory too." <glare> "Look: the customers at Cafe Milano might not know anything about food, but they know what they like." And I sat there, blinking. Then I came back into the moment, my thoughts turning toward the pizza in front of me at Teatro Goldoni, the uneaten pizza, the undercooked piece of dough with harsh dried herbs sprayed on top of it, seemingly from a firehose, and wondering to myself if I should just try and enjoy the pizza for what it was. And then I left and went to Palena.
  13. No thread for Chez Billy in Petworth? Ok, I'll go. A friend had been talking this place up late last year, so I wasn't too surprised when my SIL gave us a gift certificate here for Christmas (she lives in NYC, and asked my friend for recommendations). Were there other places I'd rather have been given a GC to in the city? Probably. But, I was also glad to have an excuse to try out Chez Billy. We went on a Sunday night, and the restaurant was never crowded, although the bar had a number of folks. The bar room is actually the more interesting of the two with its high ceilings, but the other room was nice and cozy for a winter night. It was a bit darker than I would like, but maybe I'm just getting old. Service was good. Nothing outstanding, but nothing bad. We started with Tartine Aux Champignons ($12 Sauteed wild mushrooms, grilled country bread, sherry vinegar, duck egg) and Soupe A L'oignon Gratinee Lyonnaise ($10 Classic onion soup), both of which were good. For some reason I was thinking the tartine would be more tart-like, when in fact it was just as described - a piece of grilled bread in a bowl, topped with mushrooms and a duck egg. It was good, but I think I was still thrown off by my own wrong expectations. The soup was excellent. So many times I have trouble with French onion soup cutting through the cheese and bread and eating it in a dignified manner. This was rich and cheesy, but very manageable. Our mains were Confit De Canard ($23 Pommes"Πde terre sarladaise, shitake mushrooms, garlic spinach, roasted duck jus) and Jarret De Porc ($24 Cider braised duroc pork shank, white beans, local kale, bacon). Both meats were falling off the bone, as expected, and both were very good. The pork shank was enormous, and I enjoyed the bean, kale, and bacon swimming underneath. Great wintery dishes on a cold evening. We ended with Plat De Fromage ($8 Walnut raisin toast, wildflower honey), which included a goat, a sheep, and a cow blue (I had been craving a blue cheese that day), and all three were delicious. Although I love walnut raisin toast, I wished there had been a more "plain" bread or cracker or something to let the flavors of the cheese shine through. All in all we really enjoyed our meal and would definitely recommend. I don't know if I'd drive across town, but if you're in the area, it's worth a stop. We even got parking right out front! Beats heading downtown.
  14. Well, f**k. I hate writing about restaurants any more, but decided to start this thread anyway, and twenty minutes later I was almost done and f**king Invision or whoever lost the post. Pardon my language. I'm not going to re-create all that. The basics: Nice, cozy ambiance for a quick nosh on a cold evening. I didn't take notes or play Investigative Reporter. I think there were four ramens, four rice bowls, and some number of appetizers on the menu. I had an excellent miso ramen, with flavorful broth, springy noodles, awesomely porky and not too fatty chashu . Definitely one of the better ramens I've had in awhile. Better than the tonkatsu (weak flavor, not-chewy-enough noodles) from Nagomi the day before. Two things to note: the other patrons (at 8:30 - 9:00 on a weeknight) were loud, possibly drunken 20-somethings who talked in their "HEY WE'D BETTER SHOUT 'CAUSE WE MAY STILL BE IN A LOUD BAR" voices. I'm not a cranky old lady yet; if that's the clientele, fine, I'll enjoy my ramen, pay the bill and get out quickly. The other thing: scented candles do not belong in restaurants. Seriously, restaurateurs: don't you want your customers to enjoy their food? Isn't smelling that food a significant part of tasting it? If I push the apple-cinnamon candle to the other end of the communal table, that's not a signal for your hostess to come light the other one. Anyway: great ramen. Really hoping ramen catches on in DC.
  15. I heard about Snap on washingtonpost.com's Going Out Gurus blog and was curious to see how the crepes and bubble tea tasted. For those who may not know, bubble tea is a drink that originated in Taiwan. You have a choice of tea base (black or green) and you can add milk (or not) and various flavors (ex: mango, passion fruit, green apple, etc) and then the fun part - gummy bear like tapioca balls at the bottom that you slurp through an unusually large straw. Bubble tea's this great paradox of drinking and chewing your beverage at the same time. If you've never tried it before, start with the plain milk tea and work your way from there. The store is located off Thomas Jefferson Street near the Barnes and Noble. It's a small, cute little storefront with a patio in the back to sit and relax in. (Oddly enough, it SHOULD have a restroom since it offers seating but the owner said there wasn't one and directed us to Barnes and Noble instead) OK, I could go on about the menu and the decor but let's get down to it: the bubble tea bit ventworm nuts. Bit them and spat them out. The drink was somewhat watery, no milky creaminess present. Worse yet, there wasn't much of a tea taste to the drink. There was a faint aftertaste and that was about it. The bubbles were overcooked, mushy and somewhat slimy. And worse yet, they were skimpy with the bubbles. Normally, you should have a layer of bubbles that are two to three bubbles high. We got one layer - that was ridiculous. It wasn't a horrible drink - it wasn't undrinkable per se. It just wasn't done well at all. (I know there's a thread about complaining in restaurants but how would one handle this? Basically telling them their entire product line is not executed well? That would be really arrogant of me if I did that!) As for the crepes, I've never been to France so I don't have a "golden standard" to compare them to. However, I've had some fantastic crepes in Greece (of all places) that burst at the seams with generous fillings in a well cooked thin crepe that was lightly freckled with brown spots (are crepes supposed to have a bit of brown?) Where to go for a decent bubble tea? The one place in the area that does a good job is Ten Ren's Tea Time in College Park. They also serve a green tea noodle dish with pork and tofu that's sublime. Good dumplings, too.
  16. Was there last night!! We were seated in the main dining room...very romantic. We used the coupon, although most of us ended up eating the rack of lamb and filet so we had to pay an extra $10...which was definitely worth it!! The appetizers we ordered were: Scallop margarita: I thought it was the best ceviche I have had in DC. Way better than ceiba. Mussels: garlicy and finger linking good... Steak tartare: good but we didn't see the arugula mentioned on the menu. Just a mix of mache or baby greens. Escargot: good Softshell crabs: If you think you like Corduroy's version, try the ones at 1789. The citrus sauce drizzled on the top was amazing!! I didn't care for the tempura dipping sauce because it was good as is!!! Main courses: Filet: I had this dish. The beef was cooked to perfection...good...but not like Ray's...can't wait until I get by Ray fixings tomorrow!! I didn't understand what the eggs were supposed to do. Rack of Lamb: Some of you may think it is gross...but I stole the bones from my husband and nibbled on it...all four of them!! Sorry, but that's the best part!! Pork Chop: good. Desserts: Cheese plate Chocolate tarte Lemon something... Sorbet I encourage all of you to try it.
  17. With an opening planned for late this week, El Centro D.F. looks to be another fun addition to the 14th Street lineup. Each of the three levels will offer a different experience - slightly more formal dining/drinking in the underground tequileria, more casual eat-in or carry-out in the main level taqueria, and two bars for drinking on the rooftop. (Rooftop bars seems to be this year's "cupcake".) I'm looking forward to yet another good reason to head down to 14th Street! It sure has come a long way from what it was 15-20 years ago.
  18. Interesting that there is no thread on Unum, which received a three star review from the Washingtonian in August. Has anyone been?
  19. J. Paul's? Isn't this place just the M Street/Inner Harbor tourist trap joint or am I confusing it with something else?
  20. I'd like to put in a plug for Bar à Vin, Chez Billy Sud's cozy wine bar next door. Warm atmosphere. Friendly bartenders. Interesting small plate menu. Wine. Cocktails. What more can you ask for?
  21. I had heard about this place before, as my friend Satellite Will had moved to the neighborhood, but hadn't tried it. My friend, the Booz Consultant, had a hankering for some XLB, and were not going to be able to go to Rock-vegas on a weeknight, so figured we'd check this place out. It's a super cute little restaurant. I like the red brick exterior. The first floor was pretty packed and we were going to sit at a table down there, but then the waitress told us that some old people came in, and it would be hard for them to go upstairs, so she sent us upstairs. I had the feeling no one would be up there, but the upper floor was also packed. And very Chinese. I think all the Asian people got to eat upstairs. So, we sat down. Took a while to get served. They have wine and beer, maybe cocktails, I don't remember. I got a Goose Island IPA. We ordered soup dumplings (they called them pork soup buns or something like that). 8 to an order, they took a while to come. They were small-ish, and not a whole lot of soup in them. Got a Agaric Garlic Salad, that was basically wood eared mushrooms. It was dry, but when you put the sauce on them, tasted pretty good. Then we got to ordering mains. We looked around and saw these metal bowls over burners, and tried to get an idea of what was going on there, but couldn't figure it out. There was two lovely GW students from outside of Shanghai, and we looked at their menu. Different than ours, of course. It was all in Chinese language. We asked them if there was anything on that menu that wasn't on our menu, they said it was basically the same. I was skeptical. So, then the people next to us got the same metal thing, and we asked the server. He said it was a dry pot. TOTALLY NOT ON OUR MENU!! Why do they do this??? Anyway, we got lamb dry pot and pork with garlic sauce. The dry pot came, lamb, chilis, green pepper, lotus root, mushrooms. I liked it, not super spicy. My dining partner wasn't as big a fan. I liked the pork, too, good flavor. Sort of reminded me of the sauce at the Uighur place that they give you on the side. We chatted with those students, and they said turns out the dry pot was on the Chinese menu, but not on the American one. I don't know what else was on there, but I'm sure they are hiding stuff. So, the XLB crave was sort of managed, but not the best I've had. I did like the dry pot, and don't think that's easily available in DC proper. There is probably other good stuff, they seemed to have some Sichuan options, and the beef spicy noodle soup looked good, but we didn't get since I don't eat beef and she wasn't sure if she'd be able to tolerate the heat. I'd go back and try some other stuff.
  22. I popped into Martin's Tavern last Sunday for a late brunch before attacking Georgetown Mall. The bartender was pleasant and quick. She made a first class Bloody Mary including celery stalk and sasoned salt on the rim. Crab stuffed mushrooms were average. The showstopper: Fried Oysters Benedict. WOW. My 2 favorite things on the same plate, eggs and fried oysters with hollandaise. This dish was out of this world. The oysters were the real thing, not nasty frozen things. English muffin and hash browns completed the dish. It's not crazy to rave about simple food like this. I'm heading back soon.
  23. Other than second-hand information from a hotel employee, I don't have much detail to add, but Frank Ruta is apparently going to be the chef at the Cappella Hotel at 1050 31st St. NW in Georgetown. I doubt "The Grill Room" will keep its name if that's the case, but for now that's all I know - I'm waiting to hear back from Frank.
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