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Found 18 results

  1. Didn't see a thread on this place but targeting a February opening. A little research indicates this is from the same people who run St. Arnold's Mussel Bar.
  2. I wasn't quite sure where to start the Heidelberg thread- feel free to move it to shopping and cooking, but I wanted to note it is a great place to eat, as well. In the winter Heidelberg is more of a bakery, shop and a deli. They have beautiful breads, pretzels and pastries, they have pies, they do cakes, they have a wide selection of marzipan goodies. They also have chocolates and cheeses and meats. They make sandwiches and etc. In the nicer weather though go for the wurst. If you drive by and see their tent out front that is when to stop by. They grill multiple types of sausages on the grill brautwurst, knackwurst, weisswurst and debreziner, which they serve with kraut on a really nice roll that is appropriately crisp and soft. I particularly like the curried ketchup to put on it. You can get a combo with a pretzel and drink, or with kraut and German potato salad and drink or add to that pretzel and a piece of apple strudel for the ultimate combo. If you can't decide on a sausage no problem they will cut you off a piece of each to sample. The kraut isn't too sour, but has a nice crunch and tanginess to it. The warm German potato salad is really good, the potatoes are tender and there is just the right amount of sauce not to overwhelm the potatoes, but to bind them nicely. The pretzels are wonderful, soft and chewy with a nice shell and just enough coarse salt. The apple strudel has nice cooked apples inside, the pastry is dense, but still light and very flavorful. Really worth a stop. They have tables and chairs outside, some with umbrellas to eat your goodies in good weather. They only have one table and a little counter area inside. Here is their website- it's pretty informative. Heidelberg
  3. Let me get this out the way: I don't care how important, influential, or historic "Nosferatu" is - it's boring as *hell*. Before you commit to watching this legendary 1922 German horror classic, be aware that the original soundtrack has been lost, and that there are several different versions out there. Also, there is enormous variation in quality between prints - I watched one that was in extremely poor condition; some of them are digitized and even partly colorized, and I'm pretty sure watching a better print will help to ease the pain. Rather than throw grenades at this undeniably important work, I'll just say that it is a "must" for serious students of film, particularly German Expressionism (see also the thread about "From Caligari to Hitler"). In terms of entertainment value, it's akin to reading "Gulliver's Travels" or "The Prince." One thing I learned was just how much homage was paid to "Nosferatu" in the 1985 vampire film, "Fright Night." I could rattle off no less than a half-dozen direct parallels between the two seemingly distantly related films, from the way the vampire rose straight up from his coffin, to him ultimately being slain by the powers of a pure woman at dawn - there is no question that the creators of "Fright Night" were paying clear and direct tribute to "Nosferatu." Also no question that watching "Nosferatu" (I recommend afterwards) will give you both greater respect for "Fright Night," and a better awareness of the importance of "Nosferatu." It is late in the evening, and I am so utterly *sick* of this 90-minute film that I'm going to cut this posting short, but for the three members of this website that might have seen it sometime in the past, I'd be delighted to discuss this influential classic with you. I can't recommend it as "a good time," but I can recommend it as "an educational experience." Here is a much, *much* more valuable and thoughtful review by the great Roger Ebert, much of which I'll agree with ... tomorrow: Sep 28, 1997 - "Nosferatu" by Roger Ebert on rogerebert.com Aug 18, 2016 - "11 Nightmarish Facts about Nosferatu" by Mark Mancini on mentalfloss.com
  4. This is posted just outside the entrance of German Gourmet in Bailey's Crossroads.
  5. So, yesterday the mister and I were out running errands, and were heading west on Lee Highway after stops at Arrowine and Artisan Confections, feeling a bit peckish and wondering what to do for lunch, when a banner caught my eye: Hot Brats to Go So what could we do but make a quick u-turn and stop in? I got mine plain, without sauerkraut or mustard, on a hard roll. Wonderful. Crispy skin, juicy meat, nutmeg-scented. Fantastic. Picked up some beers I hadn't seen before, since I was there. The place was hopping, too. Nice deli counter with all sorts of meats, and pastries, and other baked goods, and good German beer selection, and wine, and boxed and canned goods. Why does no one mention this place? Or did the sucky Invision search engine fail me again?
  6. I did not know there's a sausage party in my backyard, it's called Tysons Biergarten. You have to buy food and drink tokens. Website
  7. I can count on one hand the number of novels that left an indelible mark on my mind--literature that painted pictures so vividly that the imagery stays clearly with me years after I read the book. "The Tin Drum" by Gunter Grass is one of a handful of novels that I will never forget. Grass is an amazingly talented author. His prose is lyrical, even translated from German. To mark the 50th anniversary of the book, "The Tin Drum" was painstakingly re-translated (with a great deal of input by Grass himself) by Breon Mitchell, who made great efforts to preserve the poetic nature of Grass' prose. Earlier editions merely translated the meanings of his German words into English. This translation retains the beautiful richness and rhythm of his words. There is a very interesting chapter in the back of the book that discusses this process. If you purchase the novel, I highly recommend you get a copy with the newer translation. "The Tin Drum" is political, satirical, dark, moving, hilarious and thought provoking. There are elements of magical realism and historical fiction. I recently watched the 1979 award-winning film adaptation of this book. It is a good film, but far inferior to the novel. There is so much in this book that the movie can barely skim the surface. The casting was brilliant and the acting was great. The film touched on several of the highlights of Oskar's life, but so many of my favorite parts of the book were missing. Watching this film and thinking you know the story of "The Tin Drum" is like going to Epcot and saying you've been to Europe. ***SPOILERS FOLLOW*** Several of the most memorable scenes in the book are also in the film. But the imagery that Grass paints with his words is far more powerful than watching these somewhat shocking events play out on film. A pivotal moment in both the book and the film is when one of the major characters dies. This corresponds with the Soviet occupation of Poland. All of the details in the book are there, including Oskar's contribution to this person's death and the role of a Nazi party pin. But in the book, as the corpse lies on the cellar floor and the family scurries in panic around him, Oskar is transfixed by a trail of ants marching around the body and into a bag of sugar. With that one small detail, Grass speaks to the futility of war and the insignificance of man in the scope of the world. The addition of this one small detail makes a powerful and moving scene all the more powerful and moving. This is just one example of why the book is so superior to the film. If you love thought-provoking, exquisitely written literature, do not miss out on this fabulous book.
  8. Although I've never read the groundbreaking 1947 book on which it is based, this is a fine documentary which covers German cinematic development and progression between the two World Wars, and does it using beautiful, important film clips from historic movies. Its major flaw is that, were it not for the clips, it would be akin to enduring an arduous lecture about something you don't know enough in which to have an interest. This is an extremely fertile period in German Cinema, and it is explored here very thoroughly - although the clips save it from being completely austere, you really must *want to learn* about this subject to get the most out of this fascinating documentary - look closely enough, and you can see WWII on its way, which chilled me to the bone. Has anyone else out there besides me seen this important documentary? If so, which parts struck you as being the most poignant? I believe this is a documentary to see by those who have seen some of the films, and not a primer which tells the viewer which they should watch (although it certainly could be used as such) - a certain amount of prerequisite knowledge is required in order to fully appreciate its otherwise-meaningless words. One legitimate way of watching the documentary would be to stop anytime a film is referenced, watch that film, and then return to where you left off in the documentary - by the end, you'll have a working knowledge of this period in German cinema superior to that of even most film students. "From Caligari to Hitler: German Cinema in the Age of the Masses" (<--- this is an outstanding review on variety.com) is available for free with an Amazon Prime membership (an oxymoron, I realize).
  9. "Das Boot" is perhaps the finest war film I have ever seen. It is certainly in my top three films about war. I recently watched the Director's Cut of this German film, released in 1997 (the original was first shown in German theaters in 1981 and then as a TV miniseries). "Das Boot" is an adaptation of Lothar-Günther Buchheim's 1973 German novel of the same name, and it tells the fictional story of a German U-96 crew during World War II. The director's cut is 3 hours and 29 minutes long, combining action sequences from the 2.5 hour original theatrical release (which garnered six Academy Award nominations) and character development from the miniseries. Improvements in the picture and sound were also made. Yes, 209 minutes is a substantial amount of time to devote to watching a film, but I can tell you, the Director's Cut is worth it. I have watched much shorter films that seem twice as long. I found this film riveting from the bawdy opening scene to the closing segment, one of the most poignant and moving moments I have witnessed on film. The tension in this film is palpable. The tedium and the fear of fighting a battle deep beneath the surface of the sea is made incredibly real for the viewer. I felt great empathy for the characters, and forgot they were Germans, fighting for the other side. They were men, some really boys, struggling to do their best under the most difficult conditions. This is one of the best films I have seen - an epic, classic, World War II tale - and I highly recommend it.
  10. "German Restaurant Takes Signed Trump Photo Down after Barrage of Yelp Complaints" by Ken Meyer on mediaite.com
  11. Thanks for the reminder! Every so often I think about going there, but it always slips my mind. I may have to put that on the agenda for this weekend. Suggestions on dinner selections?
  12. Wedged between Public Bar and Shake Shack, in the nebulous area between Dupont Circle and Downtown, is the month-old Sauf Haus Bier Hall, the hottest, noisiest place I've been to in years. Read on ... If you got a knock on the head, and woke up inside of Sauf Haus on a busy night, you might briefly think you were at Eighteenth Street Lounge. I passed a young customer-counter outside, then walked up long flight of stairs to get there (it's on top of Shake Shack), and immediately got in a three-person line for what turned out to be a surprisingly nice unisex restroom. As I reached the front of the line, a rather desperate-looking young girl asked me if she could go in and quickly wash her hands, and I said of course (props to her because she really was in there for about fifteen seconds, giving me a thankful nod on the way out). But it's odd to me why someone here would want to wash their hands because this place is a *dive*! There is but one plausible explanation which I shall address in a moment. Sauf Haus was packed, and I mean Eighteenth Street Lounge packed, so I was stunned to see one, single barstool available, and nabbed it pronto (thus not seeing the rooftop patio and bar). It was very hot in there, perhaps eighty degrees, so a cold beer was starting to sound awfully good. This was a very young, boisterous crowd, probably averaging in their late 20s, and with very few people over 40. Umm ... Which is why I was so surprised - no, make that shocked - to see their beer selection. All-German, and 16 taps pumping out ice-cold half-liters and liters of some very worthy beers - names like Stiegl, Franziskaner, Weihenstephaner, Hoffbrau, and Spaten (which my auto-correct just changed to Spittoon). Honestly, I thought I counted 18 taps when I was there, but everywhere I fact-checked online says 16, so we'll go with that number for now. Not immediately realizing how German this place was in spirit, I ordered a "pint" of König Ludwig Dunkel Weiss ($8), and got served my beer perfectly poured into a Weizen glass. Yes, it was served too cold, but it was hot enough in the bar where you wanted your beer nice and frosty. I'm not sure how many decibels were flying around Sauf Haus last night, but have you ever seen those conversion tables? The ones where 30db equal a quiet library whisper at 6 feet distance? Well, this would have come out somewhere between a motorcycle and a sandblaster - I was also shocked to see the sign that said "60 Maximum Capacity," although the room was not all that large, so 50 people bouncing their shouts off the walls can make a lot of noise. They have sausages on the menu here which, I believe, are locally sourced, but the thing that attracted my attention (recall now the young girl washing her hands) was the large, blue, circular plastic tray on my left which contained the single largest pretzel I've ever seen. This pretzel was so big that if you unraveled it, it would probably be about a yard long, and it had the thickness of a russet potato, or a girl's arm. Looking at the menu, I saw these pretzels in addition to the sausages, and they sell three sizes: 1) two little ones, 2) a one-pound pretzel, and 3) a two-pound pretzel. Yes, a two-pound pretzel - for twenty dollars! Apparently, these are baked at Heidelberg Pastry Shoppe, and having been to Heidelberg dozens of times before, I believe it. I'm assuming the pretzel on my left was the two-pounder, but quite frankly, I'm surprised it only weighs two pounds. I finished most of my beer, then hopped off my barstool, headed back down the stairs, and went out into the night.
  13. We were looking for a place to watch today's World Cup game, when I read about a NEW place called Biergarten Haus on H Street, right next door to the Rock N Roll Hotel. Apparently they just opened a couple of weeks ago. Given the 99 degree weather, the outdoor BeerGarden didn't sound quite so appealing at 2pm, so we went elsewhere (Flanagan's Harp & Fiddle in Bethesda), but LATER (around 7pm) we decided to check it out. It's a 21+ only place, so it's not a kid friendly place to dine. Once you walk in, you feel as if you've walked into a nice, dark, cold bar in Germany, with oodles of German beers on tap...giving you a feeling that a good rendition of OKTOBERFEST is about to ensue. As you walk past the bar, you see the entrance to the large open air Biergarten. A very celebratory high tent top loosely covers 2 huge projection screen TV's, numerous wooden tables & benches, tables for 2 on actual beer barrels & an outdoor bar. A walk past that bar puts you passing the small stage where a fun LIVE polka band was playing & leads you to the truly outdoor Biergarten, covered only by HUGE outdoor table umbrellas & a fully blooming Fig tree. With so many German beers on tap & no clue what to order as I'm generally not a beer drinker, my boyfriend correctly suggested the yummy Franziskaner Hefeweizen, a smooth, ever so slightly sweet (but not like a Lambic) beer with clear tones of banana, honey & clove. A DEFINITE choice for non-beer drinkers or those that would like a soft & smooth refreshing beer. With all the right ambiance: outdoor Beergarden, live Polka band & yummy beer, we of course, had to try out the food which looked incredible. We all got the DELICIOUS Knackwurst Platter (veal, pork & fresh garlic) with the YUMMY sauerkraut (cooked with stewed apples, Caraway seeds & bacon) & the potato cake (taste was OK, but it wasn't crisp or memorable like its plate companions), topped with a tasty fresh white bun. After the more than satisfying meal, although quite full, we all decided that when in Rome (or a Biergarten), you gotta try the Homemade Black Forest Cake...and boy are we glad we did!! Rich sweet creme, soft & moist German chocolate layer cake & tart cherries, all topped with generous shavings of German chocolate. Ohhhh...I almost forgot. Don't expect to only hear live polka music & German drinking songs (plenty are played), but we were also treated to a sudden random karaoke rendition of Garth Brooks' "I Got Friend's in Low Places" Silly but fun, because it was only that one song. You could see they are still not fully up & running as we saw 3 empty mounted TV wall brackets in the full outdoor Biergarten. We overheard that they are waiting to have murals painted outside before installing those TVs. My friend who lived in Germany for over 1 year said he was definitely feeling this place, the beer & the food. Definitely a new favorite hang out spot. Curious to hear what others have to say about this place.
  14. Euro Bistro is on Elden which is basically Baron Cameron as it goes into Herndon for those who are newer to the area, like I am! Jeff and I went to supper here tonight and had many delicious tasting dishes. We started with a nice shrimp bisque each - it only needed fresh pepper but since none was offered we used the table pepper, it tasted perfect after that. Next we shared a nicely presented goat cheese and proscuitto plate and some hot bread. We had some soft drinks, but they have an extensive wine/beer list. Then we ordered the main course hubby got one type of veal dish which was called Z-something... and I got another one that had heavy cream and mushrooms and bits of cooked bacon, a "heart doctor's delight"! Then we got dessert, mine was a tasty hot apple streudel w/vanilla bean ice cream. He got the bread pudding. Both were presented beautifully as well and tasted very good. The price w/tip was under $75.00 for all that which included soups, appetizer, 2 entrees, 2 desserts and half a dozen drinks. The service was pretty good, but could be a bit better. It's funny the other day we felt a restaurant was too attentive, I guess I am too picky. http://donrockwell.com/public/style_emoticons/#EMO_DIR#/tongue.gif
  15. The Batter Bowl Bakery. Keep in mind I am but one voice, and all of my neighbors publicly drool over it, but I am not a fan. Croissants made of phyllo dough, not flakey or buttery, but weirdly dense in the middle. illy coffee, eh. I am a big fan of the illy espresso cups, have a set at home, but we have better options in DC for coffee. Frenchie's during the H Street Farmer's Market is sooooo much better. Better isn't even the right word, the product is totally different.
  16. I couldn't find a thread on Standard, the new "BBQ" place on 14th in the former garden store. I put BBQ in quotes because even though pulled pork and brisket sandwiches are served, it comes across more as a sandwich place than a true BBQ place. That's not a bad thing. There's a tiny indoor space with the kitchen, a few bar stools and the bathroom. The real action is outside, with picnic tables and table service. The brisket sandwich was pretty decent - the meat was juicy and salty and tender, but I don't know if BBQ purists will really rank it highly as BBQ. No worries. This is an excellent place to spend an hour or so on a sunny day. The beer list is interesting enough, the sandwiches are tasty, the onion rings are crisp and the servers were friendly. The price is right, too. $8 for a big sandwich, which is great for that neighborhood. The vibe is relaxed, like hanging out in a good friend's back yard. I think it's a great addition to the area.
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