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Found 8 results

  1. This human pogo stick deserves his own thread. I can think of three unstoppable shots off the top of my head in NBA history: Elvin Hayes backing in to the basket on his strong side, then turning around and shooting a fadeaway bank shot; Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's sky hook, and Kevin Durant's jump-back from 25 feet. Critics say all he needs to become the "total offensive weapon" is to put on some upper-body muscle; I disagree. Let him wait until later to muscle up; right now, he's so quick that he can do anything - drive past you and tomahawk it, or back off and shoot a three. When he's in his 30s, then he can hit the weights - let him stay slender while he's young. The only comparable player I can think of, style-wise, is Dirk Nowitzki. Tonight, he broke his string of 12 consecutive 30-point games, and he did it by scoring 24 points, going 10-for-12 from the field, sitting out the entire 4th quarter, and dishing out 7 assists - many of them to Serge Ibaka who went 12-for-12 from the field: the two combined to go 22-for-24! This is just crazy what we're witnessing right now. Jordan, Bryant, Maravich, Erving, Bird, James - I've never seen more jaw-dropping highlight reels (although some of Jordan's and Bird's come close). All Durant needs is longevity, and he could well become the NBA's all-time leading scorer.
  2. Stephen Curry: His unique version: Float Like a Butterfly Sting Like a Bee Stephen Curry has surprisingly risen to the very upper echelon's of professional basketball. Last year he led his team, the Golden State Warriors to a tremendous regular season record and an NBA championship. He was the league MVP. His play epitomizes the changing nature of the pro game of basketball-> more outside in than inside out. His ascendancy is surprising. While he was a relatively high draft choice, he had been a very slight shooting guard from a small school. He only played point guard in his last year of college so he was not an accomplished ball handler. His father, though, was a noted NBA sharpshooter before him. Curry's improvement is spectacular. He is clearly one of the premier, most important, most valuable players in professional basketball at the moment. With all that Curry is extraordinarily fun to watch. He really seems to float, not run. Its as if his feet and coordinated extraordinary ball control are moving in a different dimension but all in sync and only he knows where he and the ball are going. On top of that he has the deadliest outside shot, with a quick release. He is dangerous. And to top it off, he is a "dancing celebrating athlete in his prime". Watch him play and dance. Entirely different but reminiscent of Mohammed Ali in his fighting, floating, stinging prime. "Best of Steph Curry's Incredible Start" on espn.go.com
  3. "It's Showtime: Why The Cavs and Warriors in the NBA Finals is the Best Thing for Basketball" by Anthony J. Fredella on straighthoops.com
  4. The game just started, I'm at a sports bar, and I want *both* teams to win! It hurts not to see Tim Duncan starting.
  5. When Stephan Curry made this one play one TV commentator called it the best move he had ever seen. High praise from somebody who watches and has watched endless basketball for years. Curry's coach, Steve Kerr, a former NBA guard has a priceless reaction. Its remarkably quick and fluid. I had to watch it several times. Its Harlem Globetrotter like, only in real competition, with real defenders 3 to 4 trying to steal the ball, block Curry's movements etc. Best move ever???? I don't know. But its fun to watch. It starts when Curry gets the ball from his center/teammate and then moves at tremendously rapid speed, each element of his play astonishingly fluid, one following the other. Bet he can't do that again!!!!!
  6. Am I the only person who thinks this "small ball" nonsense has hurt the quality of play in the NBA? Give me a 7-foot center and a 6-10 power forward any day of the week. Fifteen minutes ago, there wasn't a single player on the court over 6'8". There's no question that with the advent of the deadly 3-point shooters, the game has been changed, but rebounds are still rebounds, and there's no reason you can't have both on the same team. I see championship NBA teams 10 years from now having guards like Stephen Curry *in addition to* centers like Patrick Ewing and power forwards like Tim Duncan (okay, maybe not all 3 of those people on the same team, but you know what I'm saying). As surely as 350-pound offensive lineman are different than 210-pound quarterbacks, so it shall be in the NBA. I also think that these are two of the worst teams ever to play in an NBA finals, superstars aside. Any other opinions?
  7. This video which pieces each score, basket and foul shout, made by Klay Thompson, in his record setting quarter, during which he scored 37 points, all without a miss is truly stunning. Thompson's shooting during the quarter is the purest description of "being in a zone". He does have a remarkably quick and seemingly effortless release. Lots of shots...not a miss among them.
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