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Found 4 results

  1. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse On view November 1, 2018 through April 28, 2019. "In the Hirshhorn’s largest interactive technology exhibition to date, three major installations from Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Pulse series will come together for the artist’s DC debut. A Mexican Canadian artist known for straddling the line between art, technology, and design, Lozano-Hemmer will fill the Museum’s entire Second Level with immersive environments that use heart-rate sensors to create kinetic and audiovisual experiences from visitors’ own biometric data. Over the course of six months, Pulse will animate the vital signs of hundreds of thousands of participants. With Lozano-Hemmer’s trademark sensitivities to audience engagement and architectural scale, each installation captures biometric signatures and visualizes them as repetitive sequences of flashing lights, panning soundscapes, rippling waves, and animated fingerprints. These intimate “portraits,” or “snapshots,” of electrical activity are then added to a live archive of prior recordings to create an environment of syncopated rhythms. At a time when biometry is increasingly used for identification and control, this data constitutes a new way of representing both anonymity and community. While reflecting on the upcoming exhibition, Hirshhorn Director Melissa Chiu offered the following: “Lozano-Hemmer will activate the Museum like never before…His hypnotic installations invite museum visitors to participate in a one-of-a-kind experience while addressing complex themes surrounding agency, mortality, and ownership.” The exhibition begins with Pulse Index (2010), which will be presented at its largest scale to date. The work records participants’ fingerprints at the same time as it detects their heart rates, displaying data from the last 10,000 users on a scaled grid of massive projections. The second work, Pulse Tank (2008), which premiered at Prospect.1, New Orleans Biennial, will be updated and expanded for this new exhibition. Sensors will turn your pulse into ripples on illuminated water tanks, creating ever-changing patterns that will be reflected on the gallery walls. Pulse Room (2006) rounds out the exhibition. The final installation features hundreds of clear, incandescent light bulbs hanging from the ceiling in even rows, pulsing with the heartbeats of past visitors. You can add your heartbeat to the installation by touching a sensor, which transmits your pulse to the first bulb. Additional heartbeats continue to register on the first bulb, advancing earlier recordings ahead one bulb at a time. The sound of the collected heartbeats will join the light display to amplify the physical impact of the installation. Six short documentaries of Pulse works will also be exhibited, showing the breadth of the series through video footage of various other biometric public-art interventions in Abu Dhabi, Toronto, Hobart, New York, and Urdaibai, Spain (2007–2015)."
  2. Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes On view November 8, 2018 through January 27, 2019 "The largest US museum survey of this pioneering artist to date, Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes features more than thirty large-scale paintings that reveal the artist’s considerable influence in the field of contemporary art. One of the most inventive artists working today, von Heyl has earned international acclaim for continually rethinking the possibilities of contemporary painting. Her cerebral yet deeply visceral artworks upend longstanding assumptions about composition, beauty, and narrative. Drawing inspiration from a vast and surprising array of sources—including literature, pop culture, metaphysics, and personal history—von Heyl creates paintings that are seemingly familiar yet impossible to classify, offering, in her words, “a new image that stands for itself as fact.” In studios in New York and Marfa, Texas, von Heyl combines a rigorous, process-based practice that demands each painting develop through the act of painting, itself. The spellbinding results invite you to explore a unique visual language, exuberant and insistent. Organized in collaboration with the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, this major multinational exhibition highlights the artist’s groundbreaking artistic output since 2005, including recent works that point to new developments in her constantly evolving practice. Together, Snake Eyes shines an international spotlight on one of today’s most dynamic painters and demonstrates the vitality and limitless possibilities of painting."
  3. Every year for at least twenty years now Smithsonian Gardens and the US Botanic Garden have teamed up to do an exhibition of orchids from their spectacular collections. The 2017 exhibition will be held at the Hirshhorn Gallery. It opens January 14 and runs through May 14. My understanding is that this is going to be more art show than science exhibit; I know that SG staff are really excited about it. The displays will be changing frequently: as plants finish blooming, they'll be replaced with new ones. Be aware that crowds are expected for the Yayoi Kusama exhibit starting in late February. I'm told that the lines for that shouldn't interfere with viewing Orchids: A Moment, but don't be surprised. Better yet, get your free timed entry tickets for the Kusama show so you can enjoy both.
  4. I was going to post this as a reply to "Orchids: A Moment," but decided instead to make it a separate topic, as the Hirshhorn's "Gallery Talks" are important events, with regularly changing material. These are often referred to as "Friday Talks," as they're often (perhaps even usually) on Friday afternoons, but not always. One of these in particular which relates to the orchids exhibit is on Jan 27, 2017: "Orchid 101." I know a few people who are orchid enthusiasts, and you won't meet a hobby or a passion, anywhere with more devoted followers. To many, orchids are no different than dandelions; to orchid lovers, they are as important as fine wines, and the level of detail in which they show an interest is no different than memorizing the locations, boundaries, slopes, and micro-climates of Burgundian vineyards.
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