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Found 18 results

  1. Windy City Red Hots is the website of a remarkable truck which daily parks in the lot of "Blue Mount" Nursery on route 7 about two miles west of the intersection with route 28. This is the LAST place on the face of the earth (Antarctica included) that one would expect to find an authentic Chicago hot dog. Yet it delivers: Vienna beef on a poppy seed bun with celery salt, neon green sweet pickle relish, sport peppers, chopped onion, a dill pickle wedge, yellow mustard and a slice of tomato. No, this isn't Hot Doug's but it is remarkably good for the D. C. suburbs. All of the condiments and the hot dog are sourced from Vienna Beef. They also have Italian beef and polish sausage, too but I haven't tasted these yet. Frankly, this was shockingly good to find on the side of the road half way between Sterling and Leesburg. Not worth a trip from D. C. but worth a detour from elsewhere. Blue Mount, by the way, is one of the best nurseries in the D. C. area. A Great hot dog truck parked in front is a real plus! The owner, an enthusiastic 32 year old ex Chicagoan, is active on Twitter, Facebook and MySpace with links on his website. Regardless, he makes a really good hot dog that tastes for all the world like his truck is parked across from Schaumburg Mall.
  2. Haute Dogs & Fries has just opened in Alexandria at 610 Montgomery St (steps from TJ Stone's). I haven't been to this location, or the original in Purcellville, but it looks like they will be a nice addition to the north end of Old Town.
  3. There's a sign in the window of the old Ben & Jerry's saying the place is leased. 'Bold Bites' is the name of the place I think. No idea when it'll open.
  4. I was watching a baseball video from the Dead Ball Era, and noticed a brief glimpse of a vendor (presumably in Chicago) selling "Red Hot" sausages. You can catch a glimpse of this at around the 5:18 mark (look at the bottom-center of your screen, but don't blink, or you'll miss it). (I think it's pretty safe to say that Barry Bonds would have hit about 9,000 home runs had he played in the 1920s.)
  5. Anyone know where u can get a chicago style hot dog in the dc area? With respect to Ben's Chilli Bowl, i like my hot dogs Chicago style. --- The following posts have been split into separate threads: Haute Dogs and Fries (goldenticket)
  6. So there's a new BurgerFi opening on Monday (Sept 26) in the what became the final resting place of Pat Troy's Ireland's Own (111 N. Pitt St). Based on a quick peek in the window, the interior looks to have been nicely renovated; lots of warm wood flooring and paneling, long communal tables with overhead hanging lights, an elevated counter area near the rear of the space. The menu of burgers, dogs, fries, and custard sounds a bit like Shake Shack, no? Craft beer and wine are also mentioned on the window graphics. This location will join four others in the area (Silver Spring, Woodbridge, Leesburg, and Laurel). We'll see how this location does, as there will be competition from the Five Guys, which will soon be relocating to the former Bertucci's space on King Street. Has anyone tried out the other locations?
  7. I love hotdogs. My favorites are natural casing dogs by hebrew national, nathans, thumans, shofar, etc. Has anyone found a place that sells good natural casing dogs in NOVA area? I once found Usingers being sold at TJs but have never seen it again. Pretty good dogs can be had at the deli counter at wegman's but I refuse to pay $6 per pound for a hotdog. Second question is why so many skinless dogs by nathans and hebrew national at local groceries but you cannot find the natural casing version?
  8. This morning in his chat, Tom Sietsema said that the owners behind Matchbox and Ted's Bulletin are opening DC3, a hot dog-oriented place in the old Firehouse Cafe spot. But the Barracks Row Main Street blog says that Xavier Cervera, the owner of Molly Malone's, Lola's, and the Chesapeake Room is behind it. Are all these folks working together on this place, or is one of these sources wrong? It sounds interesting, though I remember the sausage place up in Adams Morgan didn't last very long, so I wonder how this will do.
  9. Interesting story focused on how food at the ballpark is undergoing an upgrade (actually this has been a trend underway for several years now, starting at Camden Yards) "All across America, the national pastime has been hustling to keep pace with the latest food trends: Juicing in baseball has taken on a whole new meaning, with fashionable cold-pressed fruit and veggie juices sold at Marlins Park in Miami. At Citizens Bank Park in Philly, even fans with celiac disease can enjoy a cheesesteak "” or choose from a bunch of other gluten-free options from Section 136. Phillies faithful who have no aversion to wheat, meanwhile, can gorge themselves on artisan-style doughnuts designed by James Beard Award-winning chef Michael Solomonov. At Fenway Park in Boston, there is now a whole peanut-free zone, where clean-up crews take extra care to eliminate every trace of the old-fashioned shelled snack in line with modern concerns about allergens. And, in Denver, the crew at Coors Field seems especially eager to adopt the latest food craze, laying claim to a trio of firsts over the past several years: MLB's first dedicated gluten-free stand (2009), first food truck to set up inside a ballpark (2011) and, in a remarkable flip-of-the-script to Field of Dreams, the first sustainable garden to be built within a ballpark (2013)."
  10. This sucks. Not that there's much to differentiate the various hot dog and papaya drink places in NY, but Gray's was my first. It's a bit like cheesesteaks in Philly: whichever one you first fall in love with is the one that you hold above all others. The original is still open, but I don't make it to the Upper West Side much.
  11. Manouche. Sporadic schedule, typically late at night towards the end of the week. The Man is trying to keep him down. Not sure what kind of dogs (But he does grill them, and toast buns if you want) he uses, but he makes his own chili, and cooks up this "GW Sauce" composed of various veggies (Mostly squash and onions with spices) to go on the dog. Really cool guy, too. Very friendly and conversational. Located at 21st between H and I streets, in front of Tower Records.
  12. Frankly eating that many hot dogs in a day leaves me feeling very ill. If you are in the mood for a culinary adventure near the big apple, this excursion seems to be a real treat: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/25/dining/dog-ziggity-new-jerseys-own-hot-dogs.html My fave line from the article: ........"making a gut bomb of indescribable proportions"
  13. About 7 miles from Malvern is Wayne, home of Johnnie's Dog House. Every time I am cast into indentured servitude of my mother-in-law, I manage to make an escape to grab a Connie Island, and a plain dog. I just wish we had a hotdog stand nearly as good around here (Ben's is not this good).
  14. For those who like to sample some swine with their healthier farmers market purchases, the South Riding Farmers Market, which is actually now the Wellness Connection Farmers Market at the new Gum Spring Library in Stone Ridge, Saturdays 9-1, has a barbecue guy who does ribs, pulled pork, sausages, and hot dogs. It's Uncle Fred's BBQ Smoke Shack: here's their Facebook page which has their number and locations.
  15. I'm eating my very first one as I type, from a food truck parked with a bunch of others, on Mass Ave near Union Station. Lots of food for $8, and pretty tasty. I think the truck is called Krazy Koshary and I got the basic with beef.
  16. "You like onions?" I'm standing in front of James McLaughlin today at Howard University, watching him ladle me up a cup of chicken dumpling soup. I had just come from one of the three Coco Bread carts near the School of Business, and Mr. McLaughlin's Food Cart was my last stop. After this, I'll have visited every establishment featured in the program "Neighborhood Eats," televised on WETA Thursday evening at 8 PM. I approached the food cart on the corner of 6th Street and Howard Place, and saw a man quietly going about his business, a senior citizen. We nodded hello, and I asked, "Are you Mr. McLaughlin?" He looked at me in a guarded way, and said, "Yes." I introduced myself, and said "I heard you're going to be on TV this week." He then smiled and became animated. 'Oh! When is that going to be?' We began chatting about the show, and then I mentioned that I'd like to buy some lunch. I had heard he sold soups that his wife makes, and he walked me around to the side of the food cart, where he had three different vats of soup. Chicken and dumplings, that was the one for me. He grabbed a paper coffee cup, opened one of the vats, and began ladling in some soup. "You like onions?" "Sure..." "Good. That's how I like mine. It really brings it to life," he says, spooning some diced raw onion on top, sticking on a lid, and handing me the cup. We chat some more. "I've been working at this same cart for 35 years." Before that he was across campus selling ice cream out of a truck. "When did you first come to Howard?" "1968." "Why did you come here?" 'I had a gas station on Benning Road. They burned it down in the riots. So I went out and bought a truck, and I've been here ever since.' In the meantime, a couple of younger girls come up, relatives or friends of Mr. McLaughlin, and overhear us talking. It's time for me to go, and as I'm walking away, they ask me again when the show is to be aired. "8 PM this Thursday night." 'Good. I'll make sure not to watch it - I don't want to see his face any more than I have to!' She's laughing. I get into my car and flip open the lid of the soup. Driving away down Georgia Avenue, I take a sip, nod my head, smile to myself and think, 'Good call on the onions, Mr. McLaughlin.'
  17. Not a cart, but 14th & U seem to be the happening cooridor these days. ChiDogos. (have not tried, but Vienna Beef dogs Chicago-style are the best, right?)
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