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Found 6 results

  1. I like Sriracha, but it is one of the most overrated hot sauces in America (behind Tabasco, perhaps a few others). How overrated is it? Consider that I'll probably get beheaded for saying this (please re-read the first three words of this post before placing me in the guillotine). "Foodbeast Discovers What The Sriracha Factory Actually Looks Like Inside ...." by Peter Pham on foodbeast.com
  2. The Cult of Crystal Hot Sauce - How New Orleans’s famous cayenne condiment conquered America, by Tim Ebner Nov 13, 2017, 10:02am EST, on eater.com.
  3. OK, I'm going to push back on this a bit. Full disclosure...back in the day, when I was in a different industry in a different place, McIlhenny was my client. So, as a Louisiana native and someone who's actually BEEN to Avery Island, where the McIlhenny's first grew the peppers and made the sauce...I feel a strong affection for the brand and the need to defend it just a bit, at least from a historical perspective. I don't know exactly what you mean by overated (flavor? unwarranted popularity? lack of complexity?). But the history of this product and the family is really fascinating, and really, Tabasco was way out in front of hot sauce popularity in this country. Avery Island, the "home" of Tabasco, sits on a natural salt dome. It is a luxuriously tropical place, filled with swamp wildlife, flowers and the Asian sculptures collected by the McIlhenny brothers on their travels (I recall a massive Buddha). They also planted acres of bamboo because they liked Asian bamboo forests. The place is magical, otherwordly (it was, back in the 80's. It may be a theme park now). No one went there accidentally - you had to drive for miles out in field and across bayous. You went there to VISIT. Picnicing was encouraged. You could sit by a bayou and listen to the gentle clacking of bamboo against bamboo, watching birds of all kinds and, if the wind was right, getting a lung full of red pepper fumes! The McIlhenny family cultivated the tobasco peppers (a very distinct variety of peppers, which I believe they still use today) and grew them on top of the salt dome. Everything they needed for the sauce was in one tiny spot in the middle of nowhere in Southern Louisiana. The original ingredients are still the same ingredients - red peppers, salt, vinegar. When I visited the Island, back in the mid-80's, the sauce was still made by workers who lived on the island, and who all stopped work at noon and sat together on large picnic benches for "family meals." The filling and packaging operations were comically rudimentary. It was like stepping back in time. I am sure it is not like that now (or like that only for visitors), but even in the 80's, that operation served the global demand for Tabasco. The family, however, was extremely shrewd. Their lawyers chased down every Tabasco imitator they could find, to stop copying of the labels, the bottle shape, the cap shape...all which they protected legally. I believe they have unique legal rights to grow the actual pepper, too. I am not sure. The family was extraordinarily generous to the people of Southern Louisiana, and to the other businesses with which they affiliated. They have been a symbol of the culinary tradition of South Louisiana for decades, and the brand is fiercely loved by many people who certainly have knowledge of and access to many other hot sauces. It's not a complex sauce. It was never meant to be. There are so many hot sauces now that it's easy to dismiss Tabasco as just a mass-marketed sauce designed for common palates. But I see it as an importan piece of Louisiana culture and history, and my house, is NEVER without a large bottle of original Tabasco. I have LOTS of other hot sauces. I collect them while traveling and I receive a lot as gifts. But when I cook, I use Tabasco.
  4. I love Double Golden Fish Brand made from chiles, garlic, salt, not pastes or preservatives. Grand Mart used to carry it and now New Grand Mart doesn't. I will try the various asian food wholesalers of the wholesale Union Market ut the time I tried to go, I was too alte and they were all closed. Shark Medium and Strong are good, mild is worthless.
  5. I just moved to Crystal City (Arlington) and I need to restock my hot sauce supply, as the bottles that I have left are going quickly! I've done a little internet research for places that sell hot sauce in the DMV area and the resarch has revealed that there is a place called Mediterranean Bakery in Alexandria, which has a lot of hot sauce. Also, Uncle Brutha's and Infusion Hot Sauce Company are both based in Rockville. I'm hoping that there is a place that has an entire wall of hot sauces (like Peppercorn, on the Pearl St. Mall, in Boulder or Hot Licks in Old Town San Diego). Does anyone know of a place like this and/or can you confirm that Mediterranean Bakery has this many hot sauces? Thanks!
  6. Look at this. 16 million Scoville units - has anyone tried this stuff? As one of the comments says, can it legitimately be called a "sauce" or is it just some sort of chemical?
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