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Found 7 results

  1. I read the NY Times article that I'll link below a couple of months ago and was curious to see how Bon Chon chicken tasted like and to my surprise a Bon Chicken store opened up inside the new Lotte Plaza Int'l supermarket in Germantown. I looked around their website and it looks a new one is also opening up in Annandale [this link has the new location] on 7/15. Anyhow, if you happened to be up in Germantown, I highly recommend you try this korean-style fried chicken. It has a very light flaky skin and juicy meat that tastes wonderful. They have two flavors, soy garlic and a spicy variation. Both my wife and I were partially to the spicy one. The pieces of chicken are available in drumsticks or wings and come with a radish side dish that some korean restaurants serve as a pan-chan. Feb 7, 2007 - "Koreans Share Their Secret for Chicken with a Crunch" by Julia Moskin on nytimes.com
  2. Had a delicious lunch today during my first visit to Bom on 18th st in the heart of Adams Morgan. It has a rather large menu for a korean-fried chicken place with a similar menu to the BonChon chain plus a bunch of other appetizers and entrees and sides (sides may be identical to BonChon). The food is legit tasty. We started with pickled radish and kimchi. The friendly waiter asked whether we preferred fresh or old/sour kimichi and when we couldn't decide he brought both. Both were very good - I liked the fresh one better while my friend enjoyed the more sour/funky one better. Next we were served a large stone bowl of bibimbap while we waited for our wings. The bibimbap had a nice over easy egg in the middle surrounded by a mix of fresh veggies and our choice of protein - spicy chicken (there are 3-4 other choices including a vegetarian option). It was very flavorful served with gochujang spicy sauce on the side. It was ample for 2 to share or would make a whole hefty meal for one. Very fresh and well made - the stone bowl was great to get the crispy rice on the bottom. Finally our wings arrives - we got a mix of wings and 2 drumsticks - half spicy and half soy. Very similar to BonChon and equally yummy. The spicy had some real heat but an enjoyable amount, not melt your face spicy. They also have an ongoing 20% dine-in deal because I guess they get a lot of carryout. It was mostly empty during lunch. I will say the decor was an interesting mix - they have a clubbish bar, then a ton of TVs like a sports bar, and then a bunch of tables for more of a sitdown restaurant vibe. Regardless, we both thought the food was great and a good price for the neighborhood. We plan to add it to the lunch rotation.
  3. Bonchon Chicken, a Korean Fried Chicken (KFC) franchise, is coming to Philadelphia. I suspect Philadelphians will immediately fall in love with the eternally crispy skin, and that the novelty will wear thin after enough time goes by. The quality of some of the Bonchon franchises has slipped here in the the Washington, DC area (here's the Washington, DC thread if you want to get some historical background). Nevertheless, it really is unlike anything you've ever tried before - they double-fry it in a super wok (I think), and the chicken stays hot and crispy for over thirty minutes (actually it stays crispy for much longer than that). You can get a double-mix of drummies and wings, and soy-garlic and hot chili sauce - I've always found the wings with soy-garlic to be the best combination - the drumsticks (the actual chicken) have really changed in quality and size (they are now nuclear-sized) over the past couple of years. "Update on BonChon Korean Fried Chicken" by Arthur Etchells on phillymag.com This will have multiple locations in Philadelphia before you know it. "Bonchon" means "my hometown," by the way.
  4. Kochix is a tiny little, mainly takeaway (there are two bar stools and a counter) Korean fried chicken joint in that opened up about a month ago in the space that used to be Arthur Treacher's. As far as I know this is the only Korean fried chicken in DC proper (Is that right?). On our first visit tonight we got a medium combo order (7 wings and 4 drums), half spicy and half sweet soy, and a bulgogi. In texture, the chicken is closer to American style wings than what I've come to know as KFC through Bon Chon (comparisons to Bon Chon are going to be inevitable with this place, and that's not going to work in their favor) -- the skin gives way with a slight crunch, but nothing like the crispy "shell" Bon Chon provides. The glazes feel like they were applied outside rather than integrated into the batter, if that makes any sense. Both flavors are sweeter than the Bon Chon equivalents, and the spicy is not as spicy. These are not bad chicken wings on their own merits, but again, it's just very hard not to make the BC comparison. Bulgogi was downtown steamtable variety lunch spot quality (is there a name for those places? the sort that have 50 different lunch options, from southern bbq and collard greens, to sushi and bulgogi?)
  5. Ellicott City Has been open a little while, they do not have a liquor license yet, but they happily allow BYO
  6. Tian Chinese Cuisine actually isn't Chinese. It is Korean food -- the "Chinese" cuisine sold in Seoul in the same way that General Tso's Chicken is sold as Chinese cuisine here. As I have read, one of the basics are noodles served either in black bean sauce (jjajangmuyn) or in a spicy seafood soup (jjampong). But people had bemoaned the fact that no one around here makes their own noodles. Until now. An acquaintance told me that Tian had begun to smack out their own noodles. Literally. In the restaurant (and in the short video), you hear the thwack, thwack, thwack of someone slamming out noodle dough in the kitchen. With that inspiration, we ended up on only our second night of Korean-Chinese. Clearly, we're not the experts to comment on the intricacies of jjajangmyun, but the black bean noodles were delicious comfort food to me. The noodles are tender and chewy. They absorb the mild, black bean sauce, and it's a great contrast with the pickled radishes and onion that they serve as a limited panchan. We had jjajangmyun (#1) and a cold noodle soup (#18). Thinner noodles in the soup, also chewy. They came in cloudy broth with some hard boiled egg, a few slices of beef and paper-thin radishes. It's garnished with thin-cut vegetables, and you flavor it yourself with the clear vinegar that comes on the table and some excellent wasabi that comes in a small bowl. With the cold and the hint of vinegar, the soup came across like gaspacho. Refreshing and perfect after a hot day, although the taste is more mild and earthy rather than diced vegetables. Overall, Tian is a fun, inexpensive evening. Those two dishes would have filled us for less than $20. We also ordered steamed dumplings, which were fine but not special. Next time, I going for jjampong, the handmade noodles served in a spicy seafood soup. Tian offers combo meals where you can get two half orders on a plate split into two halves If the media link at the top of this post doesn't work, I posted the short video on Facebook.
  7. The Annandale Bon Chon location is now called Chi Mc, and is almost *exactly* the same as Bon Chon was, with slightly better service and (I think) a few more options to choose from. Matt "took me" there for Father's Day (he *loves* chicken wings), and it was wonderful - everything Bon Chon ever was, and perhaps more. I phoned my order in at 4:35, and they said it'd be ready at 5:10 (we ate in). They said they were out of drummies, so we got one Large Wings and a bottle of ShoChu ($33.95) and one Medium Wings ($14) - I can't find the receipt, so I'm going from memory here. We ordered them both half soy-garlic and half spicy, and plenty of drumsticks did appear after all. After receiving the shochu, and a large, thin, (temperature)-hot bowl of tofu-onion-soy soup, and two bowls of chilled, pickled radish cubes (the perfect chaser to the spicy chicken) - the chicken came, and it was virtually identical to Bon Chon's. It met our expectations and more. Matt flubbed a piano recital, and drowned his sorrows in chicken wings this evening - as a dear friend told me, "chicken wings are a unifying force of nature," and she's right. We had a fantastic time - thanks, Matt! Initialized strongly in Italic.
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