Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Mathematics'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Actualités
    • Members and Guests Please Read This
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - USA
    • Washington DC Restaurants and Dining
    • Philadelphia Restaurants and Dining
    • New York City Restaurants and Dining
    • Los Angeles Restaurants and Dining
    • San Francisco Restaurants and Dining
    • Houston Restaurants and Dining
    • Baltimore and Annapolis Restaurants and Dining
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - International
    • London Restaurants and Dining
    • Paris Restaurants and Dining
  • Shopping and News, Cooking and Booze, Parties and Fun, Travel and Sun
    • Shopping and Cooking
    • News and Media
    • Fine Arts And Their Variants
    • Events and Gatherings
    • Beer, Wine, and Cocktails
    • The Intrepid Traveler
  • Marketplace
    • Professionals and Businesses
    • Catering and Special Events
    • Jobs and Employment
  • The Portal
    • Open Forum - No Topic Is Off-Limits

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Los Angeles
    • Northridge
    • Westside
    • Sawtelle
    • Beverly Grove
    • West Hollywood
    • Hancock Park
    • Hollywood
    • Mid
    • Koreatown
    • Los Feliz
    • Silver Lake
    • Westlake
    • Echo Park
    • Downtown
    • Southwest (Convention Center, Staples Center, L.A. Live Complex)
    • Financial District
    • Little Tokyo
    • Arts District
    • Chinatown
    • Venice
    • LAX
    • Southeast Los Angeles
    • Watts
    • Glendale
    • Pasadena
    • Century City
    • Beverly Hills
    • San Gabriel
    • Temple City
    • Santa Monica
    • Culver City
    • Manhattan Beach
    • Thousand Oaks
    • Anaheim
    • Riverside
    • Palm Springs
    • Barbecue
    • Breakfast
    • Chinese
    • Cuban
    • Diners
    • Food Trucks
    • Hamburgers
    • Korean
    • Mexican (and Tex
    • Taiwanese
    • Thai

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 12 results

  1. Our numbering system uses Base 10 because we have 10 fingers; yet, because of that, we end up with numbers such as "Pi," which is irrational (infinite and non-repeating) - irrational literally means, "unable to be put into a ratio." I haven't checked this, but the possibility dawned on me that there is a more universe-based numbering system that conforms with physics instead of our own human bodies. I cannot possibly be the first person to think of this, but has it ever been discovered? Maybe something like "Pi" would end up being a nice, round number in this "Universal Base" numbering sy
  2. This is incredible - watch the video in the article. Mar 8, 2018 - "Rubik's Robot Solves Puzzle in 0.38 Seconds" on bbc.com Here's the video without the article, but the article is worth reading, and can be read in two minutes.
  3. This video of "The Game of the Century" is easily understandable even to the casual chess player - as long as you have a modicum of understanding (knowing what "castling" is, for example), you'll be able to understand what Bobby Fisher was able to accomplish - there are two moves of such brilliance that I don't see how even a modern computer could have devised them: 1) Fisher's Na4, which came out of nowhere, and is called "one of the greatest moves in chess history." 2) Fisher's insane, legendary, Queen sacrifice, Be6, which resulted in a "Windmill," where the opponent is reduced t
  4. TREE(1) = 1 TREE(2) = 3 How big is TREE(3)? Bigger than anything you can conceive of:
  5. It's funny how one thing leads to another. Because of Jim's post, I'm watching "Rain Man" for the second time in my life. (By the way, this film is a whole lot deeper than I thought it was.) All because I was thinking about Daniel Tammet, and there's one thing I don't understand: In his Wikipedia entry, it says that Tammet: --- In his mind, Tammet says, each positive integer up to 10,000 has its own unique shape, colour, texture and feel. He has described his visual image of 289 as particularly ugly, 333 as particularly attractive, and pi, though not an integer, a
  6. Why is the Mandelbrot Set any more significant or inexplicable than Pi? And have there been any attempts to relate them? This seems like a pretty obvious correlation to me; just don't ask me to explain why.
  7. Thales' Theorem (named after Thales of Miletus, and theorized about 2,500-years ago) is a remarkably simple, yet brilliant, piece of work: 1. You have a circle 2. You draw a line, making a diameter. 3. Form a triangle anywhere inside the circle, using that line (AC) as one of the sides. 4. No matter where you put point B, the angle ABC will be 90 degrees. It's easily understood when visualized - go to the "Thales' Theorem" link. It's really quite beautiful, if math can be beautiful. Thales' is also, alas, the first person ever to make an attempt at "cornering the
  8. Such sad news: Maryam Mirzakhani has passed away. "Maryam Mirzakhani, Mathematician, Dies at 40" by Daniela Breitman on earthsky.org
  9. I watched "The Man Who Knew Infinity" yesterday, and liked it very much (without loving it). I knew of Srinivasa Ramanujan, because he kept popping up on these listicles of 'Uneducated Minds That Changed the World' - I knew him as 'some uneducated genius from India with an IQ through the ceiling, and a gift for math that was nearly savant-like,' but that's all I knew of him. For the education alone, I have to give this film personal points. Two films that came to mind - very quickly - when I first started watching this were (surprisingly *not* "Good Will Hunting," even though Ramanu
  10. Many of you might not know who Terrence Tao is, but suffice it to say he's *smart as hell*. A mathematician and Fields Medal winner, Tao's primary love (forgive the pun) is prime numbers. And yet, he makes a pretty blatant boo-boo in this clip on The Colbert Report - see if you can spot it: Here's a question for mathemeticians: 13 is number that can be paired with a sexy prime on either side of it (19 and 7) - is this a special genre of sexy prime? Does it have a name? Actually, now that I think about it, you have 5, 11, 17, 23, and 29, making five consecutive numbers
×
×
  • Create New...