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  1. Nope. Strip House is a normal steak place. That said, folks, one of the best kept secrets in NYC is that Peter Luger has no wait at lunchtime. Go from there to Otto to taste grappa, and you're ready for the evening!
  2. Here's to Carl Reiner, one of three comedians who seemed to have an infinite lifespan (along with Mel Brooks and Dick Van Dyke). --- "The Dick van Dyke Show" (DonRocks)
  3. I suspect most of you don't know Christine Lavin, but I remember her song "Mysterious Woman" with fondness (you can find the full lyrics in one of the comments): She didn't just fade away:
  4. I watched this (amateur-ish) Top 10-Ever listicle of Stanley Kubrick films, and came to the following conclusion, with which some may disagree: Of the Top 10, exactly 3 were on my "Best Ever" list: "Dr. Strangelove," (1964) "2001," (1968), and "A Clockwork Orange" (1971). The others - all of them - were on my "Really Good" list, but not my "Best Ever" list (I haven't seen "Lolita" (1962) or "Barry Lyndon" (1975)). What do others think? (The list itself is unimportant, and nothing more than a starting point for this thread.)
  5. The points per game say it all: 2003-2004: 21.0 2004-2005: 20.8 2005-2006: 26.9 2006-2007: 28.5 2007-2008: 25.7 2008-2009: 22.8 2009-2010: 28.2 2010-2011: 25.6 2011-2012: 22.6 2012-2013: 28.7 2013-2014: 27.4 2014-2015: 24.2 2015-2016: 21.4
  6. My knowledge of mid-19th-century Manhattan is something approaching zero. I had absolutely no idea about the gang wars of the 1840s (likewise Five Points), nor Blackwell's Island, nor the nefarious activity that occurred during the 1860s (some of it also at Five Points), and in this regard, "Gangs of New York" does a good job at teaching this important, yet little known, part of American History. I can't sit here and claim it's faithful to the truth, when I don't even know what the truth is, but it seems like it's at least trying to be. Yes, Martin Scorsese is going to throw in some drama
  7. All generations have their own little embarrassments (goodness knows, mine had "Saturday Night Fever" et al), but can someone please explain to me, other than that this man was obviously extremely handsome, what in the *hell* this is all about? I had heard of this song before, but had never seen the entire thing performed; unfortunately, now that I've watched it, I can't unwatch it. Just as hunky Edd Byrnes was born Edward Byrne Breitenberger, the beautiful Connie Stevens, was born Concetta Rosalie Ann Ingoglia. Both singers-actors are alive and well.
  8. It's ridiculous that we don't have a thread for Mark Slater, a personal friend of mine, and donrockwell.com Member #14. Aside from Mark being exceptionally gifted as a a fine-dining sommelier - both in terms of maintaining a wine list, and in establishing a rapport with customers - I have had the pleasure of dining with him on many occasions, and he has an excellent palate. In 2007, he won the James Beard Foundation's national award for "Outstanding Wine Service" while he was sommelier at Citronelle. One thing many people don't know about Mark is that he studied harpsichord in V
  9. I know the book has been around for 6 years or so, but I recently read Kitchen Confidential while I was on my trip to Hawaii and it was a great read. Out of curiosity, does anyone know who he is referring to as Bigfoot? Also, has anyone here actually tasted Anthony Bourdain's food? Does he suck per his own self assessment or is he just being self depricating?
  10. This may sound ridiculous, given that he's 16-years older than I am, but Jim Palmer was actually somewhat *after* my time as a baseball fanatic (at ages 7-12, I knew more about baseball than I know now, and I was something of a prodigy) - Palmer really didn't hit his stride until halfway through "my prime." I had always thought that he was something of a prima donna, but after watching the video I'm going to present to you, I think I was wrong - he had a very difficult childhood, having been adopted at birth, having lost his beloved adoptive father, Mo Wiesen, at age 9, and having gone fr
  11. Jeff Corey (1914-2002) is another fine character actor who merits his own thread (if I see about five different performances, I'm going to give any of these talented actors and actresses their own thread - they deserve it). For those of you who've heard the term, but have never really heard it defined, a "character actor" is someone whose face you've seen a million times, but can't come up with the person's name - there are a lot more of them, both in Hollywood and on television, than you think, and Jeff Corey was certainly one of them. This is but a small portion of what he has done - ju
  12. Should be a popular one. Looks like they have timed and untimed tickets available on the Brooklyn Museum website. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving "Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s unique and immediately recognizable style was an integral part of her identity. Kahlo came to define herself through her ethnicity, disability, and politics, all of which were at the heart of her work. Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the largest U.S. exhibition in ten years devoted to the iconic painter and the first in the United States to display a collection of her clothing and other
  13. This is an arcane piece of trivia - I'm pretty sure this was essentially unknown, but I spent about twenty minutes researching it. Arlene Martel was a fairly prolific TV actress in the 60s and 70s, and best known for being Spock's would-be wife, T'Pring, in the original Star Trek episode, "Amok Time." She was also one of the singers in the Mean Joe Greene Coca-Cola ad, "Hey Kid, Catch!" 😯
  14. opps, somehow missed this one, but still two months left to get up to NYC. Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again Few American artists are as ever-present and instantly recognizable as Andy Warhol (1928–1987). Through his carefully cultivated persona and willingness to experiment with non-traditional art-making techniques, Warhol understood the growing power of images in contemporary life and helped to expand the role of the artist in society. This exhibition—the first Warhol retrospective organized by a U.S. institution since 1989—reconsiders the work of one of the most inventive,
  15. MOMA is one of the finest modern-art museums in the world, accommodating 2.8-million visitors in 2016, which was #13 in the world that year. In Midtown, it houses such masterpieces as "The Bather" by Paul Cezanne, "The Starry Night" by Vincent Van Gogh, "The Dance (1)" by Henri Matisse, "The Dream" by Henri Rousseau, and many, many more.
  16. Opening today at the Guggenheim, a two part, year-long exhibit of work by Robert Mapplethorpe. Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now January 25–July 10, 2019 July 24, 2019–January 5, 2020 "In the thirty years since his death, Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989) has become a cultural icon. One of the most critically acclaimed and controversial American artists of the late twentieth century, Mapplethorpe is widely known for daring imagery that deliberately transgresses social mores, and for the censorship debates that transpired around his work in the United States during the late 198
  17. George Kennedy is probably best-known for "Airport," but his finest performance might have been in "Cool Hand Luke," in which he was Paul Newman's superior-turned-fanboy. Here's Bob Hope introducing Patty Duke, who presented the 1968 Academy Award for "Best Supporting Actor."
  18. This video of "The Game of the Century" is easily understandable even to the casual chess player - as long as you have a modicum of understanding (knowing what "castling" is, for example), you'll be able to understand what Bobby Fisher was able to accomplish - there are two moves of such brilliance that I don't see how even a modern computer could have devised them: 1) Fisher's Na4, which came out of nowhere, and is called "one of the greatest moves in chess history." 2) Fisher's insane, legendary, Queen sacrifice, Be6, which resulted in a "Windmill," where the opponent is reduced t
  19. I'm thinking about my options of getting to/from DC/NYC - has anyone rented a car in one city, and dropped it off in the other? Amtrak round-trip between the two cities seems to be $88 for economy tickets, or $176 round-trip. Renting a car one-way appears to be about $100 a day (that would be renting at one airport, and dropping it off at another - for example, renting at Reagan, and dropping off at Kennedy). That's a lot of money for a car rental, *but* if you can do what you need to do in one day, and get the car returned within 24 hours, it isn't much more expensive than taking t
  20. For anyone traveling up to NYC during the holidays or in the New Year. Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future "When Hilma af Klint began creating radically abstract paintings in 1906, they were like little that had been seen before: bold, colorful, and untethered from any recognizable references to the physical world. It was years before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others would take similar strides to rid their own artwork of representational content. Yet while many of her better-known contemporaries published manifestos and exhibited widely, af Klint kep
  21. Too awesome not to share (play this for someone blind sometime - they'll *never* guess who it is). This is actually from 1959, not 1962:
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