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Found 59 results

  1. The points per game say it all: 2003-2004: 21.0 2004-2005: 20.8 2005-2006: 26.9 2006-2007: 28.5 2007-2008: 25.7 2008-2009: 22.8 2009-2010: 28.2 2010-2011: 25.6 2011-2012: 22.6 2012-2013: 28.7 2013-2014: 27.4 2014-2015: 24.2 2015-2016: 21.4
  2. MOMA is one of the finest modern-art museums in the world, accommodating 2.8-million visitors in 2016, which was #13 in the world that year. In Midtown, it houses such masterpieces as "The Bather" by Paul Cezanne, "The Starry Night" by Vincent Van Gogh, "The Dance (1)" by Henri Matisse, "The Dream" by Henri Rousseau, and many, many more.
  3. For anyone traveling up to NYC during the holidays or in the New Year. Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future "When Hilma af Klint began creating radically abstract paintings in 1906, they were like little that had been seen before: bold, colorful, and untethered from any recognizable references to the physical world. It was years before Vasily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and others would take similar strides to rid their own artwork of representational content. Yet while many of her better-known contemporaries published manifestos and exhibited widely, af Klint kept her groundbreaking paintings largely private. She rarely exhibited them and, convinced the world was not yet ready to understand her work, stipulated that it not be shown for twenty years following her death. Ultimately, her work was all but unseen until 1986, and only over the subsequent three decades have her paintings and works on paper begun to receive serious attention."
  4. Too awesome not to share (play this for someone blind sometime - they'll *never* guess who it is). This is actually from 1959, not 1962:
  5. Most of us know him as "the chef at Grapeseed who makes your hand disappear when you shake his," but in his previous life - which now must seem an eternity ago, Jeff played for one of the most legendary high school football teams in the history of the Washington, DC area, the dynastic Seneca Valley Screaming Eagles of Germantown, MD, who hold a record 12 Maryland State High School Football Championships, even though the school opened fairly recently in 1974. During Heineman's time at Seneca Valley, they won the Class A State Championship his freshman and sophomore years, 1979-1980 and 1980-1981, going undefeated at 12-0 his sophomore season. Heineman was listed as 6'4", 275, and was a two-way starter, at Center and Offensive Tackle on offense, and Defensive Tackle on defense (whew!) He was All-County in the Montgomery Journal (since absorbed into the Washington Examiner). He was an Honorable-Mention All-Met in the Washington Post, and was named one of the Top 100 Linemen in the Nation in USA Today, as well as being named one of George Michael's "Golden 11" Football Players (here's an example with the 2006 list). He is in the Seneca Valley Athletic Hall of Fame, and was recognized as the Best Defensive Lineman at Seneca Valley in the 1982-1983 season. However, his football career was not yet over. Oct 11, 1986 - "Unlikely Indians: 4-0 and No. 5" by Neil H. Greenberger on washingtonpost.com With Heineman a four-year starter at defensive tackle (he started one game his freshman year), the William & Mary Tribe in Williamsburg, VA was an NCAA Division I-AA Independent school during his tenure, but they made the Division I-AA Playoffs for the first time in school history, in Dec, 1986, his final season, with only 16 teams in the country qualifying - they ran into a juggernaut, losing to the University of Delaware in the first round, 51-21, but their football program was founded in 1893, and Heineman's squad broke a 93-year drought of no post-season football. I suspect the win over the University of Richmond, one week before, in what was then known as the "I-64 Bowl," (now called the Capital Cup) was Heineman's sweetest, with the Tribe defeating the Spiders on their own turf for Heineman's final football victory of his career. Heineman's athletic career was still not over after football, however, as he dropped 30 pounds and became an international rugby player. After his football career in college, Heineman played Club Rugby, and was named All-East Coast in 1988. He then moved to New Zealand, and made the All-Province Team playing Second Row (that's a position) for North Otago in 1990-1991. I suppose at some point he realized he was going to have to work, and so after stints in various restaurants, he opened Grapeseed in 2000, and they just celebrated their 16th anniversary last week, on Thursday, Apr 7, 2016. Congratulations, Jeff, on having wedged two very successful lifetimes into one.
  6. The writer of a January 1,1859 (that's correct) NYT review of NYC restaurants ended by noting that unlike certain London saloons, he knew of no establishments "...where the knives and forks are chained to the table to prevent their being stolen, and a Newfoundland dog is kept under the table for guests to wipe their hands on." Jan 1, 1859 - "How We Dine" by the Strong-Minded Reporter of the Times HowWeDine.pdf
  7. Jeff Corey (1914-2002) is another fine character actor who merits his own thread (if I see about five different performances, I'm going to give any of these talented actors and actresses their own thread - they deserve it). For those of you who've heard the term, but have never really heard it defined, a "character actor" is someone whose face you've seen a million times, but can't come up with the person's name - there are a lot more of them, both in Hollywood and on television, than you think, and Jeff Corey was certainly one of them. This is but a small portion of what he has done - just what *I've* personally seen in the past couple of years, which should tell you he's done a *lot* more than this. Actively involved in television in the 1960s (Corey was blacklisted from Hollywood for refusing to name names before the House Committee on Un-American Activities in the 1950s), he played a major role as Byron Lomax in the somewhat Orwellian, 1963 episode of "The Outer Limits," - "O.B.I.T": It's fitting that Corey played in Hollywood during the seminal year of 1967, as Mr. Hickock (Dick Hickock's father), in Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood": In 1969, Corey played High Advisor Plasus in an episode of "Star Trek" clearly influenced by Fritz Lang's "Metropolis" - "The Cloud Minders": Back in Hollywood, he plays a vital role in the 1969 film, "True Grit," as Tom Chaney, committing the murder near the very beginning which is the raison d'être of the entire film: From that same, fertile year for Corey, 1969, he played Sheriff Bledsoe in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid": The following year, 1970, he would play a well-received role as the logical Dr. Miles Talmadge on "Night Gallery's" "The Dead Man":
  8. Just heard that Bourdain was found dead in his hotel room in France of an apparent suicide
  9. When I was a young adult, Pee-Wee Herman was everywhere - nearly as ubiquitous as Barney.This, until it all came crashing down one evening in a movie theater, where Rubens was arrested for lewd behavior, indecent exposure, etc. Yes, he was gay. Which is is precisely why I believe a Presidential pardon is a legitimate option (albeit not anytime soon) - times have changed, and while, on the surface, getting caught yanking it in a movie theater may seem like an "oops," back then it was a career-ending transgression. I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but I pretty much give carte blanche on the "transgressions" of gay people, pre-acceptance: bathhouses, casual sex, The Follies, glory holes - hey, these people have sex drives like the rest of us, and even though, in reality, some of this behavior was extraordinarily risky (cf: "Dallas Buyers Club") it is *all* understandable, completely forgivable, and quite honestly, had I known the shame and humiliation gay and lesbian people were going through - all because they were *perfectly normal* and needed sex, as surely as someone needs a glass of water - I would have given them the keys to my house, gone out to dinner, and said, "Here, have fun - back in a couple of hours." Maybe I'm wrong, and I'm certainly open-minded to reading other opinions (no matter what your opinions, your viewpoints and perspectives will absolutely be tolerated here, as long as they don't involve politics, religion, or mean comments about other people. I realize the "Presidential pardon" comment is political, so you should feel free to ignore that, and simply discuss the issue in general - or anything else you wish to discuss about Reubens.) I do know that there were some issues down the road, regarding underage pornography, and sure, the line must be drawn somewhere - but I don't know any specifics regarding Mr. Reubens' situation; only about the career-ending incident in the movie theater, which I believe to be the height of intolerance and cruelty.
  10. I just watched this episode of the Dick van Dyke show, probably for the first time in thirty years. In it, Rob Petrie mentions Mathew Brady, and I'm saying to myself, 'Who in the heck is Mathew Brady?!' Well, Mathew Brady is perhaps the photographer whose work you've seen more than any other in your entire life! Every time you pull out a penny, or a five-dollar bill, you're looking at a Mathew Brady. Who knew?
  11. This may sound ridiculous, given that he's 16-years older than I am, but Jim Palmer was actually somewhat *after* my time as a baseball fanatic (at ages 7-12, I knew more about baseball than I know now, and I was something of a prodigy) - Palmer really didn't hit his stride until halfway through "my prime." I had always thought that he was something of a prima donna, but after watching the video I'm going to present to you, I think I was wrong - he had a very difficult childhood, having been adopted at birth, having lost his beloved adoptive father, Mo Wiesen, at age 9, and having gone from being named Jim Wiesen to Jim Palmer when his beloved mother, Polly Wiesen, married actor Max Palmer in 1956 - this child had three fathers by the time he was eleven! And he had legitimate, career-threatening injury problems from 1967 through 1969 - I always thought he was just a self-pampering person, but I was dead wrong - if you watch this video, you'll see just how much he loved his three parents, both adoptive-, and step-; he never knew his biological parents, but he isn't affected by that in the video (titled, "Jim Palmer - The Making of a Hall of Famer,," and narrated by legendary Orioles broadcaster, Chuck Thompson). He was an All-State athlete in three sports, and yes, he is somewhat cocky, and maybe even a bit "self-aware" when it comes to his athletic talent (and his looks don't exactly hurt), but given the gifts he had, he comes across, primarily, as a loving, devoted son to me - I never knew! In Game 2 of the 1966 World Series, Jim Palmer pitched a four-hit shutout against Sandy Koufax, in what was to be Koufax's final game ever. In the process, the 20-year-old Palmer became the youngest person ever to pitch a shutout in a World Series game - a record which stands to this very day. On Aug 13, 1969, a day after I turned 8-years old, Palmer pitched his only no-hitter: an "ugly" game, as he puts it, with 11 strikeouts and *9* walks! But it was good enough for a no-no against the expansion Kansas City Royals (one of four expansion teams in 1969, the very first year of the League Championship Series (the Royals would exact their revenge in the 2014 ALCS)). Palmer is also the only pitcher ever to win a World Series game in three different decades, and he did it the hard way - beginning in 1966, and ending in 1983. I'm so glad I watched this video - I always respected Palmer; now, I really, really like him as well.
  12. I could not decide where this post should sit. Don: Place it elsewhere if you think it should reside in a different section. Honestly though it seems to me to transcend the sections of the blog as presently constituted. These vital andintrepid and souls from the DC area decided to visit and rate Deli's from NY to DC and in between. Four of them visiting multiple deli's in a day at times. The research stretches from 2010 to this year. NYC, Northern Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore and DC. Multiple delis. Multiple sandwiches and side orders. Tight parameters. Repetitive tastings of the same base foods. A noble task. I salute them. Here are their evaluations/ratings/reviews on the entire list of 48 delis There are background details to various trips and tastings by clicking on various links. Spectacular research!!!!! (never in a million years would I attempt such an effort but I salute the sacrifice and magnificent effort of these gentlemen!!!!!!)
  13. When I was in my teens, I had one, and only one, favorite rock singer: David Bowie. He was the solo act which twisted, and turned, and seemed the most complex to me, while at the same time being just a pleasure to listen to, and he was there at the right time. Rest in peace, David.
  14. Brenner's first time on "The Tonight Show" in 1971: Brenner, among other things, reflects on that performance in 2013. Wow, you talk about a deep, reflective opine - what he's saying extends far beyond stand-up comedy, but for *every* aspiring stand-up comedian, this is required viewing. In just eight minutes, he touches on a lot of fascinating things - Brenner was a true comic pioneer who really lived the transition from old-school to new-school:
  15. I was skeptical, but I just now tried Monk Fruit in the Raw for the very first time - my initial reaction: "I like this just as much as sugar." This is expensive, but an excellent sweetening option for a low-carb diet - it's cut with dextrose; otherwise it would be too sweet. "Monk Fruit vs. Stevia: Which Sweetener Should You Use?" on healthline.com (I've never tried Stevia, although not for any particular reason.)
  16. Some people might recognize Thomas Gomez, né Sabino Tomas Gomez, because he has one of "those" unforgettable faces - never on display more prominently than in the "Twilight Zone" episode, "Escape Clause," in which he played The Devil himself, complete with a Sebastian Cabot-like chortle (recall Cabot's role as "Pip" in "A Nice Place To Visit"). However, Gomez was primarily in films, after getting his start in theater. Although it's bittersweet that Gomez is perhaps most notable for being the first-ever Hispanic-American actor ever to be nominated for an Academy Award (for Best Supporting Actor in the 1947 film, "Ride the Pink Horse"), his talents should carry the day in the long run. In "Escape Clause," he's just about perfect in his role, and I'd love to learn more about him by watching his films - which extend over a period of decades.
  17. You had a senior moment (with which I'm becoming familiar ) with Bernard King (Albert was a star for the Maryland Terrapins - he and Gene Banks (from Philadelphia - played college ball at Duke) were the best two high school players in the country his senior year - rated higher than even Magic Johnson (I was lucky enough to see all three play in the McDonald's Capital Classic (*))); Bernard (his big brother) was half of the "Bernie and Ernie Show" at University of Tennessee, along with Ernie Grunfeld. I thought sure Albert would be better than Bernard, but it didn't pan out that way - he was a star at Maryland, and, I believe, First Team All-ACC, but he just never hit that mega-stardom I was so sure he'd achieve. (*) I distinctly remember the Program from the Capital Classic that year (though I think my brother absconded with it!) - Earvin Johnson (a 6'9" center from Lansing, MI) had a bio-sketch that I remember the beginning of word-for-word: "Great enthusiasm - cheerleader type. Says he would love to play guard one day ...."
  18. bookluvingbabe

    Long Island, NY

    So, in spite of our offer to cook Thanksgiving dinner, the in-laws have decided that Mr. BLB and I should spend nearly $500 to fly to Long Island to have Thanksgiving out. Not my idea of a good time. Or Thanksgiving. But that is neither here nor there. Anyone have any experience with Thanksgiving at the Three Village Inn? Any other ideas for where to go with a crew of 8 ranging in age from 4 to 70 something. Thanks~!
  19. I remember you were the first person to say this, and then I started noticing what a blowhard he is - it got real old, real fast. The thing is, I agree with much of what Stephen Smith says, and I enjoy his content, but I'm just getting tired of him SCREAMING IN MY EAR !!!
  20. How do you write a post about Mickey Rooney - a Hollywood legend whose career lasted 88 years? You don't. You throw something up there, and hope people fill in the gaps. I just saw Rooney - astonishingly, in the middle of his career - in the 1972 "Night Gallery" episode "Rare Objects" (all my "Night Gallery" episodes link to the best Night Gallery blog on the internet, written by David Juhl).
  21. Here's a link to a Blog that you'll probably salivate over (http://www.eatingintranslation.com ). "Eating in Translation" is by Dave Cook, a friend I go to meals with periodically. He's great at writing about, and taking pictures of, many of the ethnic places around NYC (& elsewhere when he travels). It also has its own Facebook page, filled with pictures, etc. Good for vicarious living as well as future trip planning (hint).
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