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Found 10 results

  1. Long Live Kerry Livgren This is a band of conundrums that ultimately meant it was to fall apart. But man when these guys were on, they were ON. I love many of their songs, but the one I love most is The Pinnacle. It is pretty incredible:
  2. Peter Gabriel left Genesis mainly because he got tired of clashing so much with Tony Banks. He went on to do some pretty good things. "Humdrum" (1977) "Games Without Frontiers" (1980) "Wallflower" (1982) "San Jacino" (1982) This just scratches the surface....Still, I think the tension of Genesis made for something unusual. But I do love what Pete's done on his own.
  3. Steve Hackett is a rather underrated guitarist. Enjoy. From 'Foxtrot' - 'Horizons' From 'Nursery Chryme' - 'Return of the Giant Hogweed' From 'Voyage of the Acolyte' - Hackett's masterpiece 'Shadow of the Hierophant' From another solo work 'Spectral Mornings'. Perhaps one of his most singular iconic pieces he's ever written.
  4. This, this is what my musical identity is rooted in. Los Endos (live) And studio Progressive 1970s rock. And yes, that is Bill Bruford in 1976 touring with the boys. And no, I was 9 years old so I did not get to see it. But MAN!
  5. I became a fan of this band after discovering them in the early 80s. I came close to seeing them play live in 1987, but then Fish left and there was drama. I think some of the lyrics are overwrought, and some of the music is not as great as 70s prog rock, but the sweet clean guitar is amazing. I have many favorites, but here is one sample - Jigsaw:
  6. I am kind of shocked there is no Queen thread just yet. A great body of work (mostly). Most people know all of their biggest hits, and I was a sucker for "Under Pressure" (1981) from the first moment I heard it. Enjoy.
  7. Ha! I will have you know that I LOVE Jethro Tull, and just the other day was practicing "Too Old To Rock and Roll, Too Young to Die" for future karakoe opportunities. I am especially fond of the faux-Robert-Burns era. Someday I will refine and publish my explanation of how you can tell a lot about a 50-ish white USAian man by what proggish rock group he will admit to having loved. Rush people, Tull people, Yes people, King Crimson people ...
  8. I was just watching "Mozart in the Jungle," and for some strange reason, got fixated on long-forgotten songs, and I guess it's because of the name that "Bungle in the Jungle" popped into my mind, which will probably have a similar effect on sheldman as "The Swingin' Six," and their "Zip Code" jingle. At one time, I believe Jethro Tull was respected, but this was probably the song that did them in - it's the equivalent of The Beatles singing "Love Me Do," except in reverse chronological order. There isn't much to like about this song, and quite honestly, I'd completely forgotten it was by Jethro Tull. What this post does, however, is give me the opportunity to raise a crazy piece of rock trivia. Jethro Tull was one of the most famous agriculturalists in world history, I swear to God. Click on that link and see for yourself. It's this alone that validates the post, even though sheldman may be stewing, like a tomato in a pressure cooker. Just to push him over the edge: Next up: a check-in on Bobby Goldsboro's "Honey," and an exploratory piece on whether or not rock-and-roll musicians are concerned with their "art" more than they are becoming millionaires. Also, looking into the hypothesis of whether an early verse in "Honey" - when she wiped the snow off the twig to prevent it from dying, then slipped and fell when she came back in the house - is hidden foreshadowing, as yet undiscovered by any serious musicologist - I think it's a legitimate possibility, and not as outlandish or implausible as it may initially seem.
  9. I have a young friend, 30-something, with whom I've been sharing my old musical loves for the last several years, as an educational exercise. He's been very patient about it. When I sent him off to listen to the song "A Salty Dog" by Procol Harum (1969), with a vocal by Gary Brooker that I've always considered breathtaking, he instantly jumped to talking about the drumming, which was by the late B.J. Wilson. And when I listened to the song again, it struck me that without that gob-smacking drum part, the recording would have been unbearable, pretentious drivel. So listen to Gary Brooker's soaring vocal peformance, with a big orchestra and the rock drumming of B.J. Wilson:
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