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Found 38 results

  1. Too awesome not to share (play this for someone blind sometime - they'll *never* guess who it is). This is actually from 1959, not 1962:
  2. This link is an excellent resource for discussion of all of the myriad subgenres of metal. It is pretty fascinating and a good jumping off point for finding stuff you never knew existed. Find a few bands from the linked snippets and Spotify (or other streaming tool of your choice) and prepare to find 50 other bands. Some only have a single song you might like (and think the rest are crap), but you never know! One band, In Mourning, I like only one song from, but I love it. Colossus
  3. Long Live Kerry Livgren This is a band of conundrums that ultimately meant it was to fall apart. But man when these guys were on, they were ON. I love many of their songs, but the one I love most is The Pinnacle. It is pretty incredible:
  4. My wife has been a fan of Glen Hansard for maybe the last half dozen years or so. My first impressions were that he was overwrought. A little too moody for me. Not inventive. Songs sounded too similar. Meh. But....I love my wife. And she's indulged me in my fascination with metal. And besides, I generally love Scottish and Irish music. I'm a huge Silly Wizard fan, for example. So when she suggested we see Glen Hansard at The Anthem, while I initially was not wild about it, I remembered these things and remembered that she's also turned me on to many bands and other performers that I loe dearly so, of course, we set the plans in motion. This concert was a week or two ago. It was GREAT. Tremendous performer and band. A storyteller. Inclusive. Infectious. And clearly I had been doing things wrong. Many songs, while unfamiliar to me absolutely were great. I need to listen to his stuff MORE LOUDLY. And some blew me away. Like this absolute gem. I think they stretched this to about 9 minutes. To say I was elated to see this performed by folks at the top of their game is an understatement.
  5. This, this is what my musical identity is rooted in. Los Endos (live) And studio Progressive 1970s rock. And yes, that is Bill Bruford in 1976 touring with the boys. And no, I was 9 years old so I did not get to see it. But MAN!
  6. I accidentally got exposed to The Tragically Hip back in....the very early 1990s? I saw them play at a show at Hammerjack's as a part of, I think, an WHFS thing. 'New Orleans is Sinking' was the song that drew me in. I heard a few more songs over the years, but I never bought any of their albums or saw them play again, live. Then, a few years ago, my wife gets me a compilation of their work (Yer Favourites) and I love it! They are kind of rocking, kind of Canadia, kind of thoughtful, kind of twangy, kind of just good. "At the Hundredth Meridian" (1992) "Fifty Mission Cap" (1993) "Bobcageyon" (1999)
  7. My wife introduced me to Paul Weller in the early 90s. I knew The Jam (1976-1982) because of MTV, but never made the connection and at the time it was not my thing. Over the past 20 years I have really grown to love what this guy does. Most of it is at least good or interesting, some of is is great, and he has some serious gems in his catalog. I prefer his 90s to early aughts period the most. A favorite song of mine from his body of work is "As You Lean Into The Light." Sit back, feel the groove, the atmosphere and lean in to it. It's pretty great. "As You Lean Into The Light" (Live (much extended) version - amazing): "As You Lean Into The Light" (Studio): But don't get we wrong, he also does a lot of louder/faster/robust songs. And his voice is just great.
  8. I saw these guys open for Trombone Shorty at the 930 Club a year or two ago. They're fun and interesting. This is my favorite (mostly instrumental) piece by them. "Tehuacana" from "Quartz" (2014):
  9. I first heard this version of the popular song from the 80s maybe about 5 years ago. It was so beautiful and ethereal that I went back to the original, wondering what I had originally missed. Just a stunning stripped down iteration that makes you wonder where some beloved recorded songs would fall without their original embellishments/production.
  10. "Guitarist J. Geils Dead at 71" by Jon Blistein on rollingstone.com "Musician John Warren Geils, Jr., Founder of the J. Geils Band, Dies at Massachusetts Home at Age 71" on abcnews.go.com
  11. Ha! I will have you know that I LOVE Jethro Tull, and just the other day was practicing "Too Old To Rock and Roll, Too Young to Die" for future karakoe opportunities. I am especially fond of the faux-Robert-Burns era. Someday I will refine and publish my explanation of how you can tell a lot about a 50-ish white USAian man by what proggish rock group he will admit to having loved. Rush people, Tull people, Yes people, King Crimson people ...
  12. People are probably wondering what I'm smoking, beginning a thread about "Mama Told Me Not To Come," one of the most embarrassingly annoying songs that Three Dog Night ever recorded. Worse, it was written by Randy Newman, who I find about as likable as Michael Moore, with a voice about as pleasant as Bob Dylan's. So why am I writing about such a bad song? Because it's the *only* song that I've heard Randy Newman perform (granted, a very limited selection) that I like, but only *his* bluesy version. Three Dog Night - the cover everyone knows about - ruined it by turning it into some silly soft-rock ballad: <--- This is really bad: sanitized, takes itself too seriously, no blues component, etc. But Newman's version works, because it's bluesy, gritty, and somewhat tongue-in-cheek: <--- This works So, a song that I never liked, sung by a performer I never liked, equals a performance that I like: Two negatives make a positive. And the unknown, original version by Eric Burdon and The Animals works to some extent also, because it's closer in spirit to what Newman wrote: <--- This also works (but not as well as Newman's) Trivia: Did you know that Eric Burdon was the lead singer of *both* The Animals ("The House of the Rising Sun") *and* War ("The Cisco Kid")?! I can't hear the same person singing both of these recordings, but it is so.
  13. It's pretty obviously the Beach Boys doing a pantomime "live" performance for video to go with their audio recording of "I Get Around", but without the audio of the record. When this was put together with the audio, we got this: which is actually pretty wonderful. I love the Beach Boys, who were no more dependent on studio recording than were the Beatles to make a great sound: I can hardly convey how happy "Shut Down" makes me, every time I hear it:
  14. Stairway to Heaven, generally acclaimed as one of the great rock and roll songs of all time; a rousing anthem. In this 2012 rendition at the Kennedy Center, we see it performed by Heart. A rousing version. Watch for the Obama's and Yo Yo Ma as they rock out!!!
  15. ...is "Performance", featuring one of my favorite rock song performances, "Gone Dead Train", written by Jack Nitzsche and Russ Titelman, vocal by Randy Newman, remarkable slide guitar work by Ry Cooder. Randy Newman may never have been a great singer, but he totally nails this. If you manage to make head or tails of the lyrics, you'll discover that they're pretty filthy, which is another plus. The same soundtrack features the song "Memo from Turner", written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and sung by Jagger, in one of my favorites among his vocal performances, and also featuring the excellent Ry Cooder on slide guitar. I'm ambivalent about Mick Jagger as a singer. Hard to keep him off a list of greatest rock singers, but at the same time, his singing has always been so un-musical that it's hard sometimes to think of it as singing at all. Here is a clip from the movie, starting with "Poor White Hounddog" with a vocal by Merry Clayton (whose soaring voice you may remember from the Stones' "Gimme Shelter"), segue-ing into "Memo from Turner," which was an obvious progenitor of a thousand music videos. You'll also notice the film's other star, James Fox. "Gone Dead Train" "Memo from Turner" "Poor White Hounddog"
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