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Found 98 results

  1. The restaurant will be opening this Friday. I had read about it in Bethesda Magazine when it was a pop-up in Gwenie's Pastries on Nebel Street. I went there a few times for lunch and enjoyed the limited menu. The lechon was generally tasty. There was a good quantity of moist pork. The skin was like the Golidlocks story- some was too hard, some was too soft, but most was just right. It came with lumpia and rice. I also tried the pancit. I didn't care for it- a generous amount of a lot of different things but bland. The sisig was delicious. It's described as head cheese but it wasn't a loaf- it consisted of bits of the different components- some bits were squashy, some were crispy, some were chewy, some were fatty, all stir fried with onions and hot peppers. The beef empanadas were decent. The pastry was flaky but the filling was a bit bland. The cassava cake was outstanding; I'm a sucker for eggy, condensed milky things. The staff at the pop up were very friendly and helpful. I've attached the menu for the restaurant. I'm looking forward to trying the expanded offerings. KJ Menu.pdf
  2. Xi'an Gourmet, opened in the ashes of the former Bob's space. Tim Carman wrote about it in the Post today and seems to like it. Has Anyone tried it yet?
  3. Hank Dietle's Tavern seems to have been ignored...last outpost of "old" Rockville....great hamburgers, interesting clientele. Gone but not forgotten. From the AOL guide: Just across the Pike from White Flint shopping, Dietle's little bar charges less for a beer than most people pay to tip the valets in Rockville's most upscale mall. Though it's "Cold Beer" sign and country house style look a little quirky among the fast food joints and neon lights on Rockville Pike, Hank Dietle's Tavern is Montgomery County's last true roadhouse. It's a welcome retreat -- a no-nonsense neighborhood bar with cheap beer and cheap eats. The old wooden floors still creak when you walk across the room, but nobody inside seems to care about the history. The tavern is rumored to have once been a schoolhouse or maybe a country store that dates back to the early 1900s. There's no chance you'll be wowed, but 8 wooden booths (whittled with old names), a jukebox (country and classic) and a couple of pinball machines give the place character. It's a great place to catch a game or chat with a friend. -- Denise Iacangelo and then there's this: One Rockville restaurant, Dietle's Tavern, contends it has closed because Montgomery County's smoking ban caused them to lose substantial business.
  4. I live close to both Goldbergs and Bagel City and I prefer the latter. I agree with your assessment on the crust/chew factor. Tasty, good size. Goldbergs are a little too bloated though I do like the taste. Funny enough, I actually find the service to be quick and very friendly at Bagel City when I go on a Saturday or Sunday morning - while I feel like I've gotten a colder shoulder at Goldbergs. But I'm not too fussed, they're just fetching 6 bagels out of bins for me. Oh and the 'Saturday' part of Bagel City is a plus for this gentile.
  5. Opened Wednesday next to MOM's market in Rockville. Mini chain, other locations out west. Soft opening-10% off. I went last night and suggest waiting and paying 100%. Very awkward- from being seated-to waitress-to mgrs-to owners-cooking at your table, etc. They have 2 options. AYCE BBQ or Hot Pot-or both. $24.99 for BBQ at dinner. 16.99 at lunch. more options on dinner selections. I had the BBQ. Your waitress takes your order for up to 5 meats/seafood. They then bring bunch of marinated veggies, nothing special. She also mentioned that you can order as many appetizers as you like. I ordered Japchae. That was delivered with the meats. The meats were just placed next to me. Nobody explained or turned on BBQ/ After about 10 minutes, a mgr asked how everything was- not sure why he didn't notice raw meats sitting there. I asked if I should cook- or how it works. He got the grill going and then he started cooking. Never really answered if I should be doing this. Short ribs with bones, very flavorful. Thick rib eye, just ok-dry, tasteless. Brisket (prime) very thin and boring. Another manager cam by and asked how everything was..I asked if they had sauces I could order. He then said I was supposed to serve myself at the Salad bar...had no idea, nobody had told me. Chalk that up to opening blues. Tried a couple of more BBQ options...still found it hard to figure out who cooked-or to order from. Bottom line is...I think it could be good, just not yet. If/when you're very hungry it could be a good option.
  6. I ate here tonight based on Tim Carman's enthusiastic review and was very disappointed (Carman, you've misled for me for the last time...). The Akira Ramen (tonkatsu broth, with a couple thin slices of chasu, veggies, fish cake, and half an egg) was deeply mediocre. The broth, thin and bland, had little discernible pork flavor and mainly served as a carrier for the bitter char of the chasu. The curly noodles were little to write home about (or wax poetic about in the Post). Overall, a nothing bowl of ramen. I ordered the grilled yellowtail collar as an appetizer, was told it'd take 15 to 20 minutes, so asked for it to come out before the ramen. After about 25 minutes, the ramen came out first, and the yellowtail a few minutes later. The fish was moist and nicely grilled, but it won't bring me back on its own. Sitting at the bar, you could see bowls of ramen being plated sluggishly by an inexperienced kitchen staff -- nothing like the well-oiled machine at Daikaya.
  7. Pho Nom Nom, out Rockville Pike is a bit of a drive but so worth it. Best Pho around!
  8. Bob's Noodle 66 needs to be added to the $20 Tuesday list. I attended an eGullet event there Saturday night. There were 12 people and more (very good) food than we could eat, for $16 per person, including tax and tip.
  9. Thinking of going to the Rockville location of Peter Chang this evening before being sequestered at the Courtyard Mariott for a weekend of everything the Catholic Church wants us to know about being married. Would this be our best bet for Chinese food or would Sichuan Jin River, China Bistro, Bob's Shanghai or Shanghai Taste work better?
  10. This is my favorite Chinese restaurant in Rockville. The menu is extensive, and I have never had anything that I didn't think was cooked perfectly. The squid deep fried in salt was tender, delecate, and served on a bed of lettuce and roasted garlic and onions. The Dungeness crab with ginger and green onions was wonderful. Try the seafood hot and sour soup for two. It comes in a bowl with enough for 4 at least. The whole fish Hunan style was spicy, crisp skinned and wonderfully moist and flaky. While the seafood is the star here, the other dishes are also very good. It can get crowded but it is worth a wait. The seafood is kept in tanks in the restaurant and is brought live to your table for approval before cooking. We have always had a wonderful meal there.
  11. From driving by over the weekend, it looks like O'Brien's is now named "Branded '72". Emphasis still appears to be on BBQ.
  12. From the 9/14 food section. Has anyone been? It's 2 minutes from us and we didn't even know about it. I may have to go on a fact-finding mission today.
  13. Driving through Rockville today, I felt a strange urge to detour through the parking lot where Three Brothers used to be - I hadn't noticed that this location had closed - and in its place was a dusty construction site and signage for "Pizza CS - napoletana, come sempre". Judging from the Google results, it looks like owners Ankur Rajpara and Jonathan Allen may have originally intended to open in Baltimore's Canton area before settling down in Rockville. There's the stalled rough beginnings of a website nowhere near ready for public viewing, PizzaCS.com, but the most up-to-date info comes from their Facebook page, which shows the delivery of their Stefano Ferrara oven in July and predicts an October opening date.
  14. I couldn't find a topic on this 10-year-old deli in Rockville, so let's kick it off. I had a quality meal or two today at Bagel Towne Deli, an almost kosher deli owned by an Asian family in Traville Village Center. I started with the combo fish platter, which included sizable portions of belly lox and kippered salmon, accompanied by two bagels and plenty of garnishes -- cream cheese, shaved red onions, sliced tomatoes, sprouts, olives. It was really delicious and really filling....so, of course, I ordered another meal. This time it was chopped liver with accompaniments like rye bread and sliced onions and tomatoes. Wow, I was stuffed, and it all tasted so darned good. Then I ordered carry out, so that Lady KN could enjoy some for dinner. As I waddled out of there, the owner said "See you for breakfast tomorrow!" (There have been the occasional topic on Israeli food in this forum recently....THIS is Israeli food.)
  15. Al Ha'esh, translates to on the fire or on the charcoal. It is a nice space carved out of Kosher Mart, which I believe is now called Motti's. The space was known for generations as Katz's. It has its own separate entrance from the supermarket, and is run as a standalone restaurant, although it looks like the kitchen may be shared with Motti's. I have always said that a restaurant cannot survive solely because it is Kosher, it must also have good food. This space may have figure it out. I went here for lunch expecting some good grilled meats, Israeli salads, and some good bread. I did not leave dis-appointed. We started with an order of falafel, hummus, and babaganoush. They were served with hot pita, which was really really good (has anyone noticed pita quality recently has jumped by a huge margin?). The falafel was perhaps the best I have had outside of Israel. The hummus and and babaganoush were also very very good. For my main, I had grilled sweetbreads, which we were told was pancreas. I had never had the opportunity to sample pancreas so I thought I would give it a try. It was decent, although a small portion. It came a with a choice of side, which I opted for Israeli Salad. My friend went full out and got a skewer of chicken, steak (entrecote) and lamb kebab. Entrees come with unlimited salad and pita. The salads alone were enough for a meal, there were about 4 dishes of tahina, tabbouleh, chickpea salad, a tomato onion salad, and something else I cannot remember. All were very fresh and well seasoned. Prices are decent--at lunch, single skewer of your choice is $14.00, $18 if you want a second one, all coming with salads and pita. I should also note that they have a decent well curated beer selection both on draft and in bottles, with prices which will have your head spin a 360, drafts are $4.50 (including Unibroue from Canada, Goose Island, and Smuttynose and bottles are $5.50 (Bear Republic, Founders, Hatachio (from Japan), North Coast, Weyerbacher). Being a Kosher spot, they are not open on Friday or Saturday night.
  16. We had dinner at Addie's last night, and while it's still cute and one of the few non-chain, non-ethnic restaurants in Montgomery County, it has slipped, and slipped a lot, since were there last year. Addie's is a sentimental destination for us; we ate there the night before our daughter was born and as a parent it's hard to forget your last carefree, kid-free meal, before high chairs or babysitters become part of your life. There is an informal, cozy feel to the reataurant (located in a converted house), which is charming when the cooking rises to the level of the prices they are charging (apps $8-13, entrees $21-28), and the service is warm and polished as it has been in the past. When the food is pedestrian and the service unpolished, as it was last night, you are left to puzzle over what exactly was worth $80 a person. Addie's strength has been its appetizers, so it was shocking to look over the menu and not see a single appetizer or salad that appealed to me. I ended up ordering the field greens with Maytag Blue, walnuts, pears, and a slightly-too-sweet champagne vinaigrette. It was competently executed but almost every restaurant nowadays has this same salad on their menu. The soup was black bean with creme fraiche, which sounded perfect for lunch entree but too heavy for a dinner app. One of our friends had the mussels with tomato, shallots, and garlic. The mussels were very high quality, as I would expect from a Black restaurant but were overwhelmed by the amount of garlic in the sauce. Scott had a special, duck confit salad, which must have been good since he cleaned his plate. My entree was the "Black Pearl" salmon with Spanish chorizo rice, grilled rapini, apricot chutney, and Romesco sauce. The salmon was by far the best thing about the dish, lovely fresh and sweet and served medium. It went downhill from there. The rice tasted like it had been made hours before; it was dry and the slices of chorizo had been cooked until devoid of all juiciness and cut too small to impart much spice. The "grilled" rapini had never seen the grill, it was merely cooked until not quite done so that it was bitter and tough. The apricot chutney, of julienned dried apricot, pieces of kalamata (or a similar tasting) olive, and sliced toasted almonds, sounded intriguing and was what made me pick that particular entree, so it was disappointing that it never came together. It might have been better if the individual elements had been cut smaller and allowed to mingle maybe with some olive oil. As it was, one bite was sweet with just apricot, another salty with olive, but it was hard to get a bite that combined the flavors. The Romesco sauce combined better with the fish. I didn't taste anyone else's entree so can't comment on those. We drank a Malbec that was pleasant, fruit forward, not too heavy, and served much too warm. It worked with the fish but it would have been improved by a few minutes of chilling. The dessert menu offered cinnamon-chocolate ice cream, raspberry sorbet, apple crisp, some kind of chocolate mousse thing, and a carrot cake with creme anglais and caramel sauce. We opted for the carrot cake and it was tasty and suprisingly light, but needed more spice (cardamom would have been lovely in it), a little more frosting and a brighter sauce, maybe with lemon, to set off the richness. Little things would have improved the service. Letting us open the wine list before asking for our drink order. Replacing silver that had been taken away. Asking if we were done before clearing appetizers. Reciting the specials slowly, so that we could understand and not have to ask her repeat things. Bringing forks with our desserts. Asking "Are you finished?" rather than "Are you still working on that?" We had a pleasant evening with good friends that we hadn't seen in a long time, but expected more from Addie's. Not sure if we would go back.
  17. This morning Tom Sietsema announced that Helen Wasserman will be opening Crave by Helen in the former Addie's on the Rockville Pike. From the article: Helen is my sister. I could not be more proud!
  18. I did a quick search and found no listing for what I consider one of the more important restaurants in DC. Not since the glory days of Henry's Hunan and Brandy Ho's both in San Francisco have I found a restaurant that can have such a profound effect on me for days after eating there. I am not talking about any effects of food poisoning or any of that namby pamby stuff, but real fire from the extreme use of chilies and Sichuan peppercorns. Joe's, Joe's Noodle House, serves pretty down to earth and homespun Sezchuan cooking. Owner Audrey is there during the day. If you order one of the dishes with two chilies and a star, she will ask you if you want it "toned down". No matter what you say, it will be toned down for the first few trips if you don't answer back in Chinese. But even then, the heat will be on. I m actually at the stage where Audrey will comment that she can't eat food as hot as I like it. Joe's has far more than noodles but they are a great first introduction. There is a large selection of noodles and a few dumplings. I really like the unusual rice noodles in red sauce. No discernable flavor to the noodle itself, just a jelly like freshness that offsets the heat of the sauce. I also love the wonton or dumpling soup, with or without needles. To go with the noodles, I always have a plate or three of "cold dishes" such as pickled cabbage, sweet and sour cabbage, pickled cukes, stuffed bean curd etc. This is the same territory staked out by A & J. I like both places, with the style being more earthy and rustic at Joe's and much more restrained and slick at A & J. But A&J is not known for having a large traditional menu as Joe's has. Some of my fiery favorites on the large menu include the Spicy and Tasty Tofu (With or without pork)- I had with for lunch today!, three pepper chicken and dry and spicy beef. The greens with garlic are just that, great simple straightforward greens with loads of garlic. The selection is huge and I have probably only worked my way through a third of the menu. Rabbit, home made bacon, pork belly, pork with garlic chives and pressed bean curd, tripe with spicy sauce are all available. If there is enough interest, we can have a DR.com dinner there. I would be happy to arrange for it but no wimps allowed for my menu. It will be full of the fiery stuff!
  19. Quench has been open a few months now and I finally got the chance to enjoy it. The pedigree is there with personnel links to Bucks F&C, Volt, Black's and others. The menu is clean and appealing and there's a strong focus on mixology. The space is pretty much an open single room with a bar centered along the back wall and tables along the sides and front. So why in Rockville? I'd say they're swimming against the tide here, given how the MoCo rules around bars work. Don't get me wrong though - I'm glad they're here and I hope to support the effort as it is worth it. I'd swear the MoCo rules make it so the only way a bar can survive is to sell burgers and 2lbs of fries with it - a la Greene Turtle, Applebees, TGI Fridays, etc, etc. Quench is NOT that. They're right across from Cava. That's nice and maybe together they'll turn that little area into a better-than-average restaurant/bar desitination place. Maybe they already have. I enjoyed brunch, where I had a perfectly cooked omlette (I'm picky about that) with apples and bacon, with a simple side arugala salad with small, sharp bits of shaved reggiano (or parm, I'm never quite sure.) You can see the influences: my favorite breakfast ever was at Black's Bistro, where the eggs were the best I've ever had. The menu looks like and includes things seen at Voltaggio's places, such as deviled eggs. The service was good/efficient and the folks I spoke with were very nice. They are all-in with neighborhood involvement, social media, etc. It may take that kind of effort to overcome the tendancy to have the bar be the star and then MoCo brings it down. But if they can do it like Cava, where the food is excellent AND the bar is hopping, then they should do just fine and are a welcome addition to the area.
  20. Urban Hot Pot, which has a Facebook Page but no website yet, soft-opened last night in Twinbrook, right next door to Akira Ramen & Izakaya. It's a make-your-own hot pot restaurant, and appears to be family-friendly. Jul 24, 2007 - "Small Bites: Ramen and Hot Pot Coming to Rockville This Fall" by Joe Zimmerman on bethesdamagazine.com
  21. For the past couple of weeks Todd Kliman has had Trapezaria on his list of "where I am eating now". This was intriguing since it was listed next to Rose's Luxury and otherwise we'd heard nothing about the place. So we made a reservation via Opentable for Saturday night. Kliman's commentary that this is Greek food of a bygone era is pretty spot on. The food reminded me of the delicious goodies my college roommate's Greek grandmother (whose family had owned a South Jersey diner) used to send us. You can tell it is a family run place. The service was friendly and attentive and once our waitress took our order (it took her a few minutes to get to us) the food came out in rapid fire. Meze is a bit of a misnomer- you get gigantic portions of Greek comfort food served family style. Prices are already reasonable, but given the large portion sizes this place is headed for legendary cheap eats status. We were welcomed to the table with pita, olives, and what I think was a scoop of the fava dip. The pita is served warm but is what I would think of as classic Greek diner. It isn't anything special but it is also just a vehicle for shoveling dips. The fava dip was pretty awesome. It had a whopping umami to it that makes me think it either wasn't vegetarian (maybe made with chicken fat) or they used a chicken flavored boullion/MSG in it. I'm not opposed to that trick- I do it with beef flavored MSG in a vegetarian mock chopped liver that I make- but a fair warning to those wishing to avoid MSG. I ordered the Mount Olympus cocktail (House Infused Cucumber Vodka, Fresh Lime Juice & Ginger, Infused Simple Syrup) which was tasty but sweeter than I would prefer. My husband got a Greek beer which was described by our waitress as "Blonde like you, not dark like us" as she pointed to me and herself. We started with the Trio of Dips opting for the Melitzanosalte (Puree of roasted eggplant, parsley, garlic, olive oil & vinegar), Tyrokafafteri (a delightful spread of feta cheese, roasted red pepper, olive oil & thyme), and Taramosalata (Mashed Potato, red caviar, olive oil & fresh lemon juice). Normally we would have gotten the Hummus but we just got back from a trip to Israel and are totally hummus-ed out right now. All three were very good, although the Fava put them all to shame. Next we got Iman Baldi ("House Specialty" Baked Eggplant topped with caramelized onions, tomato, mint,Parsley, golden raisins & pine nuts) which along with the Htapodi Skaras (Grilled octopus with olive oil, lemon & oregano) were the two best things we had all night. The eggplant is served cold and had a great sweet and sour balance. For reference- you get half a stuff eggplant for $7 and it is easily a meal in and of itself. The octopus is served as four large tentacles,that were so soft and creamy that they must have been stewed before being finished on the grill giving the ends some crunch and the meat rich smokiness. They're served warm with just a half a lemon. Also, easily an entrée in and of itself. Then we shared the "entrée" Trapazaria Sampler (Spanakopita, Moussakas, Dolmades Avgolemono, & Arni Psito Served With stewed green beans). It seemed like a good way to try a wide swath of the menu and it was. Except instead of stewed green beans it was stewed zucchini and it also included Pastitsio. They serve you a platter that is so piled high with a mess of food it looks like you've just walked through the buffet at the local Greek Orthodox Church Supper. Our least favorite thing on there was the roasted leg of lamb- it was tender but very gamey. My favorite was the Dolmades and the Moussaka. Some of the items on the plate weren't as warm as we might have liked them and you could tell they were reheated, but everything tasted really good- homey good- like your college roommate's Yaya would send you. Then because we are crazy and the desserts coming out of the kitchen looked beautiful we also got the Galactoboureko (Custard Semolina Cream Wrapped in Phyllo Dough, Kept Moist in our Homemade Honey Syrup). You get two nice sized pastries; ours were still warm from the oven, along with some big chunks of cantaloupe. I'd say it was good not great. Kliman described it as fudge like. That wouldn't describe what we had. Next time I think I'd get the Baklava or the yogurt. We over-ordered for two people. With tax, tip it came to just under $100. They do a $40 per person 20 meze "price fixe" which I think would be a very good way to explore their big menu. We watched some gorgeous whole fish, roasted chicken and lamb shank coming out of the kitchen that we would like to try next time. Overall, I'd say Trapezaria will likely end up on our regular rotation. The food isn't refined and it isn't gourmet. It is just wholesome comfort food at a very reasonable price point with a friendly atmosphere. I can see this place becoming very popular. Just make a reservation for a weekend night. The place was packed at 8 pm. There was a wait for tables and lots of people eating and drinking at the bar.
  22. Coincidentally, I got a flyer today advertising the grand opening of Oh Mama Grill on Rollins Ave. (Rockville). I think it is where there is or was a kosher market and the first version of Moti's (now al-Ha'esh). Looks like they have a similar menu to al-Ha'esh.
  23. I was walking around at lunch today and passed by 100 King St (vacant for awhile) and notice a bunch of permits on the windows and obvious demolition going on. Went back to the office and did a bit of digging and found a submission by Carluccios on the upcoming docket of the Board of Architectural Reviews. Apparently a UK based Italian chain. Carluccios.pdf
  24. This human pogo stick deserves his own thread. I can think of three unstoppable shots off the top of my head in NBA history: Elvin Hayes backing in to the basket on his strong side, then turning around and shooting a fadeaway bank shot; Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's sky hook, and Kevin Durant's jump-back from 25 feet. Critics say all he needs to become the "total offensive weapon" is to put on some upper-body muscle; I disagree. Let him wait until later to muscle up; right now, he's so quick that he can do anything - drive past you and tomahawk it, or back off and shoot a three. When he's in his 30s, then he can hit the weights - let him stay slender while he's young. The only comparable player I can think of, style-wise, is Dirk Nowitzki. Tonight, he broke his string of 12 consecutive 30-point games, and he did it by scoring 24 points, going 10-for-12 from the field, sitting out the entire 4th quarter, and dishing out 7 assists - many of them to Serge Ibaka who went 12-for-12 from the field: the two combined to go 22-for-24! This is just crazy what we're witnessing right now. Jordan, Bryant, Maravich, Erving, Bird, James - I've never seen more jaw-dropping highlight reels (although some of Jordan's and Bird's come close). All Durant needs is longevity, and he could well become the NBA's all-time leading scorer.
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