Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Seafood'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Todos son Bienvenidos Aquí.
    • Todos son Bienvenidos Aquí.
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - USA
    • New York City Restaurants and Dining
    • Los Angeles Restaurants and Dining
    • San Francisco Restaurants and Dining
    • Houston Restaurants and Dining
    • Philadelphia Restaurants and Dining
    • Washington DC Restaurants and Dining
    • Baltimore and Annapolis Restaurants and Dining
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - International
    • London Restaurants and Dining
    • Paris Restaurants and Dining
  • Shopping and News, Cooking and Booze, Parties and Fun, Travel and Sun
    • Shopping and Cooking
    • News and Media
    • Events and Gatherings
    • Beer, Wine, and Cocktails
    • The Intrepid Traveler
    • Fine Arts And Their Variants
  • Marketplace
    • Professionals and Businesses
    • Catering and Special Events
    • Jobs and Employment
  • The Portal
    • Open Forum - No Topic Is Off-Limits

Calendars

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 153 results

  1. we had a good meal at plouf about a year ago: good mussels, good flatiron steak, wine, etc. it's in an alley with a couple of other restaurants that try to lure you in. outdoor seating, but we prefer it inside with the swordfish. this is not one of the very best restaurants in the city, but we enjoyed it as much as the slanted door (a totally different scene, not modern). it is off bush, a couple of blocks down from the gate to chinatown on the left heading down into the financial district, an easy walk from union square.
  2. Multi-unit deal brings crave-worthy chef-inspired fast casual seafood dishes to the East Coast. I believe the first location will be located at One Loudoun and opening in June. Several locations planned for Reston, Ashburn, Fairfax, Tysons and Merrifield.
  3. Rappahannock River Oyster (RRO) is totally overdue for its own topic here on dr.com. Of course, that assumes it doesn't already have a topic on here somewhere? I only found scattered mentions in other topics like for Union Market or under shopping as an oyster source. Bet many of you didn't know: - RRO dates all the way back to 1899 and is still owned by the same family? - Rappahannock has an amazing 8-10 seat shack in Topping, VA by the bay with super, interesting and incredibly fresh and local seafood. Has anyone been? - They just opened up their latest and most grand restaurant in Richmond at 320 East Grace St.? - That said restaurant managed to pry open (pun intended) the Columbia Room enough to get bartender Katie Nelson to consult on a drink menu paired with RRO's seafood? - That the Croxton cousins, the owners, plan to open more places to slurp, eat and drink in/around DC/VA? - That these guys really are among those leading the effort to restore the Chesapeake oyster industry and claw back market share from those pesky west coasters, canadians, kiwis and gulf coast types? - That you don't have to go all the way to Topping (or Richmond) to slurp some fine oysters since they're up and running at Union Market (okay, most already know that ) I've now eaten my way through most of the menu at the very popular RRO Bar at Union Market. Wonderful oysters whether raw or grilled. I especially like the Stingrays and Rappahannock River oysters. Raw oysters sell for $2 each. Likewise on the tasty clams. Oh, and that oyster chowder which I think is made with Olde Salts (one of the four varieties they cultivate)! And, the more substantial meals: - the crab cake is both ample and packed with blue crab (served with a very nice celeriac salad); perfect for lunch ($14) - wonderful, large, sweet sea scallops with a healthy peppery arugula salad ($14) - an interesting and satisfying "lamb and clams" dish with sofrito, fingerlings and one other ingredient I'm forgetting. ($14) The bar at Union Market also has a short but nice wine list and friendly servers. Need to get a report from someone on the new Richmond outpost as soon as a rockwellian makes it there. Maybe it'll be me...but probably not knowing how far-ranging dr members are. Nothing stays unreported on long around here. Finally, An interesting Food & Wine article about the company and it's history written by Tom Colicchio Washingtonian's coverage of the new Richmond restaurant RRO's nicely done website
  4. MissCindy beat me to it! I'd head over to Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood too, which is not in the Inner Harbor - it's at 1065 S. Charles. They expanded last year and now they have over 90 barstools, as well as picnic-style tables, and six tvs - including a couple of big screens - I was assured that the games will be on. They have a sushi bar, raw bar, and fried and steamed seafood, even pit beef coming out of the kitchen. They stay open until 11pm on Friday nights. It doesn't get any more Baltimore than this place.Easy drive to BWI.
  5. On Friday, doughboy and I went to the new St. Anselm, a Stephen Starr joint located at Union Market. Our server was friendly, and quite good at ass kissing. We had him as a server before, but we can't remember where. We started with beef tartare and blue crab deviled eggs. The tartare was mixed with lots of herbs and seasoning, thus obscuring the taste of the beef itself. The deviled eggs was good, adding crab made it different, but not better nor worse. The best part of dinner were the grilled oysters (with smoked herb butter) and grilled clams, with a chartreuse sauce. The oysters were the best since my first visit to The Ordinary in Charleston. The clams were also excellent. Unfortunately, the monster prawn was overcooked. The Butcher's Steak of the day was a hanger steak. It was cooked to medium rare as requested, and very good. At $28, it might be not a bargain (or maybe it is, I don't order steak very often). We also had the grilled salmon collar. It was nicely grilled - a treat if you like simply grilled salmon. I would go back just for the oyster, clam and maybe steak.
  6. Here is an alternative - because it is not usually on the out of town visitor's "must do" list, like the suggestions above. (I will admit I've never been to any of them but Slanted Door, and that was before it moved to its current location). Well loved by the natives, is Pesce [Moved 2013, Closed Sep 13, 2015]. Impeccably fresh seafood, and it has an accommodating long bar. It's on Polk (between Green and Vallejo) and is a friendly chichetteria in Russian Hill - the Venetian equivalent of tapas bar. Surprisingly reasonably priced hot chichetti, cold chichetti and some entrée specials on the chalkboard. If you go, definitely try the grilled octopus with celery and Yukon potatoes. There are lots of shellfish choices, some pastas, a meat or two - it is all fresh and creative, with a bargain priced wine list. No reservations though.
  7. Prince of Petworth on the receiving end of another game of telephone regarding rumors on Joe's Stone Crab coming to DC. (The typo in the title of that post and the subsequent comments are comedy gold). If true this is pretty awesome. We've resorted to next day FedEx of a few dozen claws when we get the hankering when stone crabs are in season. With shipping it ends up being about what you would pay at retail, but any time I've found them in this market they have been less than fresh. If there was a place I could plop down at the bar and get a half dozen or do when the urge hits ... sweet.
  8. Yes, it's going in the former veterinary clinic near the Belga; it will be called Senart's Oyster House, after an old ghost mural that is painted on the outside wall of the building.
  9. I understand that the folks at the McLean Organic Butcher get all their meat from local sources...we've still not made it out there, but I've spoken with them on the phone a couple of times.
  10. Anyone been to Dyllan's yet? In the old Sea Catch space in Georgetown. Been open a couple of months now I think, but no thread yet here and doesn't seem to be a whole lot of chatter about the place otherwise.
  11. I love me some mussels. But only if, and it's a big-ass if, every last one of them is perfectly fresh and each and every one of them is cooked just right. I'm beginning to suspect that this is simply too much to expect. Mussels can go bad in the blink of an eye, they can be full of grit, and it only takes one stinker to ruin a whole damn plate. But every couple of months I find myself ordering them. And 9 times out of 10 I kick myself for it when I get that unmistakable whiff of god-awful funkiness or, worse yet, toss one in my mouth and get a flavor that is vaguely reminiscent of the busiest... uhm... "adult entertainment industry professional" in town and that only gargling down half a bottle of wine will help ease my misery. I’ve awaited them anxiously at some of the most well regarded high end joints in town, and I’ve rolled the dice in some real dives. Whether I’ve paid $18 or $4.99 for a plateful, I can never be certain I’ll enjoy the results. I’m not sure what my question is, but I guess I’d like to hear from some grizzled restaurant veterans on what they do, if anything, to try and ensure that I won’t gag on a bivalve at their establishment. I totally understand that it may well be impossible to source mussels that are 99.97% pure. Do mussels get returned to the kitchen with any greater frequency than other dishes? Has anyone else’s experience been similar to mine? Should I just give up on mussels and stick to the chicken fingers?
  12. Great news for University of Maryland students: our own Ferhat Yalcin, ex-GM of Corduroy, is opening Fishnet at 5010 Berwyn Road in College Park. For many years, Ferhat and I have kicked around concepts, and he has finally found his perfect location. Fishnet is planning to serve about four types of grilled (or deep-fried) fish with 4-5 homemade sauces to choose from. Most of these will come as sandwiches, and there will be some other things such as calamari, mussels, and yep - a lobster roll. He's planning to run specials such as soft-shell crab sandwich and a whole grilled dorade platter (influenced from Corduroy). Maybe fish tacos in the future, and there will also be side dishes offered. No alcohol because he's too close to the school, but homemade lemonade, small-batch sodas, and the best news of all: delivery. Look for an August opening, in time for the 2011-2012 school year. Congratulations, Ferhat! You've worked hard to get this going, and it's finally coming into place. Nobody deserves this more than you do. Cheers, Rocks
  13. A friend just wrote and asked for the best Ceviche in the DC area - I had to think about this for a moment, but my guess was China Chilcano - can anyone come up with other ideas? I thought about Fiola Mare, but didn't see anything on their online menu. One other question: I tend to spell this "Ceviche," but have seen numerous spellings of "Seviche" - what are the roots of these variants?
  14. NEW ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT FIOLA MARE SIGNS 15 YEAR LEASE AT MRP REALTY PROPERTY WASHINGTON HARBOUR Washington, D.C., February 26, 2013 "“ MRP Realty, a real estate operating company, today announced that Fiola Mare signed a 15 year lease for 9,000 square feet at 3050 K St., NW (Washington Harbour) in Washington, D.C. The Class-A space will be will be an Italian seafood concept owned by restaurateur Fabio Trabocchi. Fiola Mare is expected to open by end of 2013. "Fiola Mare will be exceptional complement to the restaurant tenant mix we have at Washington Harbour," said Bob Murphy, managing principal of MRP Realty. "Having recently completed a significant renovation project at Washington Harbour, Fiola Mare will add to the level of sophistication that we are bringing to our tenants, residents and the community." Recent renovations at Washington Harbour include: extensive upgrades to the upper and lower level plazas with fully renovated fountains, specialized lighting and animated water jets during the warm weather and the addition of an approximately 12,000 square feet ice rink during the winter months. Additionally, the retail storefronts have been substantially replaced on both plaza levels and a new 3,200 square feet state of the art fitness center has opened with onsite personal trainers and renovated lobbies, elevators and bathrooms. John Asadoorian of Asadoorian Retail Solutions represented MRP Realty during the transaction. MRP Realty acquired the Washington Harbour property two years ago. About MRP Realty Founded in 2005, MidAtlantic Realty Partners, LLC ("MRP Realty") is a real estate operating company focused on the Washington DC metropolitan area. MRP provides a full array of real estate services including acquisition/disposition, development/construction management, property management and asset management services. MRP Realty's senior leadership team has worked together in Washington, D.C. and its surrounding market area in various capacities for periods ranging from eight to 25 years and has wide ranging experience across a multitude of product types in both urban and suburban settings. MRP Realty's managing members have been involved in over 20 million square feet of investment with a total capitalization in excess of $4 billion in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.
  15. The other week, I was staying up near Towson University, and overheard a lady talking about a crab-cake shack that was "Oprah Winfrey's favorite!" After a bit of digging, I realized they were talking about the locally renowned Pappas Restaurant and Sports Bar, famous for their crab cakes, and deified everywhere as "the best of the best of the best," etc. Because of where I was staying, I went to the Parkville location, which was interesting because it's directly across the street from (what appears to be) their main shipping facility, as well as a third building on that small intersection, for carry-out only. Here's the picture of the Parkville Sports Bar, and if you blow it up, and look closely, you'll see the shipping facility across the street on the left, and the carryout joint on the right - note the sign that says, "Maryland Steamed Crabs." Pappas is anything-but shy when it comes to flaunting all the lavish praise they've been receiving for decades - this is the bottom part of a sign that's posted on their front door - there are many, many more accolades, both on their building, and on their website. I ordered the "Double Crab Cake" for $32.99, the menu saying, "Two of the best crab cakes in town! Just ask Oprah!!" And what showed up was absolutely gorgeous: But I have some bad news for Oprah Winfrey. And I have some bad news for Baltimore. And I have some bad news for people who think they've been enjoying the world's best Chesapeake Blue Crab for years if not decades. Sigh ... I don't see how this was possibly Chesapeake Blue Crab. Furthermore, I don't see how it was possibly from Maryland, or even from America. It seems like I'm always the person who walks in at 4 AM and pisses on the party which has been going on since sunset; I also wonder if I'm the only person who notices, or even cares, about these things. From the very first bite, I "knew" this wasn't Chesapeake Blue Crab - the lumps were *enormous*, the size of grapes, and were extremely consistent in size (huge), texture (tough), and taste (nearly absent). And $32.99 for two crab cakes that were *this* big? If these were made from Chesapeake Blue Crab, the restaurant would be out of business in a week. I'd already made up my mind, but I needed something a little more "official" to go on, other than my own opinion, so I talked with two servers with whom I'd struck up a friendly rapport. "There's no way this is Chesapeake Blue Crab," I said to both of them. They both fell silent, glanced at each other for a moment, and one of them vaguely shook his head no. "Two lump crab cakes this size would cost a fortune," I added, encouraging them to say something. "You're smart," one of them said to me. "You can tell the difference." We continued our conversation. Reportedly, "they" (I'm not quite sure who "they" are) have "crab meat tastings" a couple times a week with different distributors. And, after I asked how the meat is selected, I was told - without hearing any specific names - it's from whoever has the most-consistent, least-expensive product. I'm no expert, but I grew up in Maryland, and have been eating Blue Crab my entire life - lumps this big, this firm, this tasteless, and this consistently shaped, scream out "Southeast Asia" to me (recall Todd Kliman's fine City Paper exposé about Phillip's Crab House, et al, using Southeast Asian crab meat - you can pretty much consider this Part Two of that exposé, without the extensive reporting and fact-checking that went into it). Although I didn't read every word of their menu, and haven't scoured every word of their website, I did spent about 20-30 minutes specifically searching for damning language, and I found none. Nowhere did I see that these crabs are Chesapeake Blue Crabs, from Maryland, or even from America, but have a look for yourselves. About the closest I came was in the very first picture up above - the sign across the street says, "Maryland Steamed Crabs." Note, however, that it doesn't say, "Steamed Maryland Crabs," which would give it an entirely new meaning. In other words, I am absolutely not accusing Pappas of anything shady in terms of false advertising, because I don't think they're claiming to be serving Maryland crab, and they're apparently taking great pains with their language to "circle the wagon" without actually firing a single arrow. They're letting rave reviews from "journalists" - dozens of rave reviews from "journalists" (*) - do the talking for them about what an amazing experience these crab cakes are, and there's so much noise that the ignorance of the masses seems to overlook the minor detail that they're buying into a marketing blitz that has everything to do with the Chesapeake Bay, even though the worlds "Chesapeake Bay" seem not to be used at all. (*) I was once told, by a journalist, in the angriest, most-hostile terms imaginable, that I'm no journalist - essentially because I have no training. In a similar light, I am absolutely not saying that Pappas never serves Maryland or Chesapeake Blue Crab - merely that the circumstantial evidence presented to me on this visit was pretty overwhelming. As for my meal? Just because the crab meat wasn't dredged from the Chesapeake Bay doesn't mean it wasn't good - I loved my crab cakes. Yes, the meat was bland, but it was still crab, and it was still alive and skittering around in the water, somewhere. I would absolutely come here again, and get this exact same thing, with the exact same expectations - there is minimal binder, virtually no leg meat (or much of any fibrous meat) that I could detect, and the primary scent of the crab cakes was something like that of a savory soufflé (i.e., egg, perhaps used as binder), which I find extremely appealing. The beer selection at Pappas is surprisingly good (and cheap!); the side orders are of banquet-hall quality. So don't take this as a condemnation of Pappas Restaurant and Sports Bar; it isn't. But do be aware that this one journalist's restaurant critic's person's impression is that he dined on something other than Chesapeake Blue Crab on this particular evening - extrapolate as you wish, since my investigation went no further than what you just read. That said, I doubt you'll be seeing this write-up on any websites anytime soon - being honest can be isolating, and truthful, knowledge-based writing is not very conducive to fame and fortune - at least not in this self-serving, PR-driven industry. Don't get me started on the most popular "craft beer journalists." Cheers, Rocks
  16. Apr 25, 2017 - "Take a Look inside the Stunning Seafood Restaurant from Marcel's Chef Robert Wiedmaier" by Anna Spiegel on washingtonian.com The chef comes from Brine.
  17. http://www.le-bernardin.com As a birthday present Hubby made us reservations to come to NYC and eat at Le Bernadin. Something I have really wanted to do because I really love seafood. Hubby isn't as big of a seafood person, but appreciates it from time to time. I am not sure what wine Hubby ordered, but it was light and fresh and complimented the food perfectly. The bread service was good with a choice of brioche, pretzel, sourdough, foccacio or a few other selections. Although Hubby commented that the sourdough just wasn't like what you could get in San Francisco. We had the following tasting menu: STRIPED BASS Wild Striped Bass Tartare; Baby Fennel, Zucchini Crispy Artichoke, Parmesan Sauce Vierge (This was really good, fresh, nice balance of acid.) CRAB Chilled Peekytoe Crab Salad; Baby Radish and Avocado Green Apple-Lemongrass Nage (The sauce really made this fresh and good, it made the flavors really pop.) SCALLOP Warm Scallop “Carpaccio”; Snowpeas and Shiitake Lime-Shiso Broth (My least favorite dish, although the broth was really well composed.) HALIBUT Poached Halibut; Glazed Baby Bok Choy,Bergamot-Basil Emulsion (Very nicely cooked, dense and perfectly flavored, really simple, and had a basil foam that was actually good and appropriately used to thicken the other basil sauce in a nice way.) MONKFISH Roasted Monkfish; Wilted Mustard Greens-Daikon “Sandwich” Adobo Sauce (Also perfectly cooked, the sauce on this dish was so good you could eat it as a broth.) STRAWBERRY Strawberry Sorbet, Mascarpone Cream, Basil (Fresh and a nice pop of flavor.) BLACK FOREST Dark Chocolate Cremeux, Kirsch Bavaroise, Belgian Kriek Beer Sorbet (Didn't prefer this dish at all, just didn't do it for me chocolate wise or otherwise.) Overall I thought the dishes were executed perfectly, although dessert was kind of a let down. The petit fours with the check were ok, but again would have expected better flavors, with the flavors overall being so well thought out. The sauces were absolute perfection. There wasn't any real wow, so don't necessarily expect that, and it certainly wasn't as playful as some more nouveau fine dining places, but everything was executed with a lot of precision and you didn't leave stuffed, but had eaten enough, which was a nice feeling. If the a la carte dishes are the same size, I might have left hungry with only four courses, but maybe the portions are bigger? I really liked the decor and the space between tables, it was more relaxing and peaceful than many restaurant experiences. I am glad I did it, would I go back- I am not sure. It was good, the sauces were just stellar and something you rarely see, the fish was cooked perfectly. There was just nothing I hold in my head except those perfect sauces that really caught me.
  18. This is no small statement - I don't think I've ever had "great" Conch Fritters in my entire life. (Has anyone? And, if so, where did you find them? I've been to numerous Caribbean Islands, and have never had anything better than a mediocre hush puppy with flecks of things that could have easily been clams - and I mean never-ever.) Of course, that doesn't change the restaurant up, or down, from where it might lie, but really good Conch Fritters would be worth noting.
  19. Tom Sietsema declared this to be the best seafood restaurant in DC! I beg to differ. I would have to assume that Tom got special treatment because every Jose employee is probably required to know his face. First, no geoduck, no sea urchin, and no hush puppies. I didn't realize that hush puppies need to be sourced like other pristine seafood. So we started with some scallop crudo, which should taste mild and sweet. Ours tasted slightly fishy, which made me want to hide the flavor by ingesting the celery in black pepper giardiniera. Next, roasted oysters, served with a side of Fresno chili butter sauce. One of our 5 oysters didn't pop. I complained and they replaced the order with 5 shucked oysters roasted with the sauce, which actually tasted better. Lastly, lobster jambalaya. The rice was slightly crunchy, and if you don't dig out the lobster immediately, it will become overcooked. I wouldn't say the lobster was perfectly cooked when it arrived at our table, but waiting will make it much worse. The flavor wasn't anything special. Nate Waugaman didn't shine at America Eats Tavern, why would he all of a sudden become the chef at DC's best seafood restaurant?
  20. Hi where is the best place to eat Branzino in Maryland or DC?
  21. Lunch today at Legal Sea Foods in Montgomery Mall. My companion and I agreed that the servings seemed fresher and more substantial than equivalent fare at the K St LSF. We also like the one at the airport and are neutral about the one on Rte 1. Yes, I know it all arrives from Boston on the same truck, but the outlets are so different that it doesn't seem like a chain. I had a dozen cherrystones with LSF's unique mignonette sauce -- green, tart and chunky, miles better than that awful ketchup-based stuff. I would gladly buy a jarfull if it were available. The clams were fair-sized and shucked to retain the fluid. They were tasty but I'm not sure I prefer them to the top necks I get at Sea Catch. Then I had grilled scallops with couscous, a green salad and Boston cream pie. Everything was good, and FWIW the waitress was really pretty. She packed me up a container of the mignonette, which I will traitorously carry with me to Sea Catch next time.
  22. Lady KN and I were in the Fells Point area and decided to hit Thames Street Oyster House on a Friday afternoon. In fairness, we only had access to the raw bar, as we arrived between lunch service and dinner service. No problem, as we tucked into Malpeque, another local Maryland oyster, two varieties of Virginia oysters and a dozen large shrimp as a cocktail. Everything was fresh and good, and I am definitely going to return to enjoy some of that enticing menu....
  23. There should be a thread for Dylan's, which should be regarded as the best (or a top 3) restaurant in Hampden. Spotlight here is on oysters, naturally, but easy to say that the remainder of the menu often steals the show. Bar program is high-quality too, with an emphasis on whiskies (the main bartender is a serious whiskey nerd). Highlights over several visits have included: - Coddies - basically giant cod croquettes; these are must haves - Fish sandwich - rotating selection of delicious fried fish on sesame bun with added hots. - Ramp toast - a seriously loaded-up roasted ramp and ricotta (I think? this was in the spring) toast. They occasionally have a burger special, which is supposed to be fantastic, and there is a rumored off-menu item called a "Smasher," which is essentially a coddie with the fish sandwich bun and accouterments. Sidewalk eatin' is great here too with an fun view of the busy intersection of Chestnut Ave. and 36th St. (aka "the Avenue").
×