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Found 21 results

  1. Is Trump's hidden agenda to destroy the Republican party from within? The only reason that I doubted that was that it would also bring down his brand. However, a new thought occurred to me....by delivering 60 senate seats to the Democratic party, he'd do more for the Democratic party than any current Democrat. He would be hailed as the savior of the planet by later walking back all the whacko things he said. The last person who did as much for the Democratic party was W. Not trying to start any political fights...Morning Joe (Scarborough) says Trump has been a Democrat for 65 years of
  2. I don't remember this commercial per se, but I definitely remember the chorus of this song at the end - Zip Codes have only been around for about 50 years (or, at least, that's whey then started marketing the use of them). Call me lifeless, but I've watched this entire video three times.
  3. *1841 - John Tyler: The only year we saw three different Presidents, as William Henry Harrison passed away after only one month in office *1850 - Millard Fillmore: The first two Presidents to die in office were ex-soldiers, Harrison (Battle of Tippecanoe) and Zachary Taylor (Mexican-American War) *1865 - Andrew Johnson: Shortly after Abraham Lincoln won his second term, he became the first President to be assassinated *1881 - Chester Arthur: Assumed office after the assassination of James Garfield 1901 - Theodore Roosevelt: After the assassination of William McKinley, Teddy
  4. This is perhaps the most important hour of television in history. CBS News interrupts "As the World Turns" at about the 10:00 point, and by the 45:00 point, Kennedy's death is essentially confirmed. Walter Cronkite was frantically trying to get a camera activated, and Dan Rather was corresponding from Dallas. The unfolding of events on television is nearly as newsworthy as the story itself. Still, this is up there with the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, and the only thing comparable in the past fifty years was 9/11 - I guess these are the three-biggest news events of my lifetime.
  5. President George H.W. and First Lady Barbara Bush (1925-2018) were married for 73 years. Nov 30, 2018 - "George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, Dies at 94" by Karen Tumulty on washingtonpost.com
  6. The Watergate Scandal is the first news item I can ever remember being thoroughly *sick* of hearing about (I was 11). Forty-five years ago today, there was this: "On This Day, Nixon Assures Reporters He's 'Not a Crook'" on upi.com
  7. Here is a list, ordered by descending frequency, of the official offices U.S. Presidents held prior to becoming U.S. President, along with the year in which the most-recent example began their Presidential term. As of this writing, there have been 44 U.S. Presidents, including Grover Cleveland who is on the list twice due to a gap between terms: 14 - U.S. Vice-President (1989) 10 - State Governor (2001) 5 - U.S. Senator (2009) 4 - U.S. Armed Forces General (1953) 3 - U.S. Secretary of State (1825) 2 - U.S. Minister (1857) 2 - U.S. Representative (1881) 1 - U.S. S
  8. ah, 1902! I remember it well. Wasn't that the year that the Cuban republic was formed, after the US beat poor little Spain to a bloody, whimpering pulp? The year the Charron, Girardot et Voigt , the first fully armoured "tank", was introduced at the Salon de l'Automobile et du cycle in Brussels? Even looks fun to drive! (q.v.). The year that miserable old wretch Cecil Rhodes, the worst figure in the whole of European colonization of Africa, finally did the long-suffering universe a good turn by shoving off into eternal damnation?
  9. This is my absolute favorite U.S. President trivia question, because it's one where you hear the answer, say, "I don't believe it," and go running off to Google to disprove it. Here's the question: Between the 1948 "Dewey defeats Truman" election, and the 2008 "First Barack Obama" election, how many Presidential elections didn't include Nixon, Dole, or Bush on the ticket? Run your mouse over this for the answer, which will simply floor you: ONE
  10. This has troubled me for many years, so I'm just going to put it out there, without much comment. I find it terribly sad that our Jewish actors, actresses, and others in Hollywood found (and still find) the need to make the U.S. public believe that they aren't Jewish. When our Jewish entertainers decide to stop changing their names in order to pander to middle America, that will be a sign that we're living in a post-racist society; until then, this is essentially the free market dictating behavior, and I find it sad, pathetic, and infuriating. If this falls under the eyes of any Jew
  11. The text: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." My first comment is that in Boolean Algebra (granted, something the Founding Fathers didn't know much about), AND takes precedence over OR. That's something that should at least be discussed. It's possible that in 1791, a string of ORs was ended by an AND - whatever was common practice at the time must b
  12. Believe it or not, there are two communities of Markham, Virginia - Heartland Orchard is in Fauquier County, and the other is in Pittsylvania County. Fauquier County was founded in 1759, and named after Francis Fauquier, Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia Colony. Pittsylvania County was founded in 1767, and named after William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.
  13. Did you know that Memorial Day was originally known as "Decoration Day," and observed on May 30? It has fuzzy beginnings that differ in the North and the South (with the American Civil War, and related issues, being a major influence). The name wasn't formally changed until 1968, by the Uniform Monday Holiday Act (note also this proclamation by President Lyndon Johnson), and beginning in 1971, the act officially stated that it was to be observed on the final Monday of each May. There's a lot to read about it - you can spend five minutes, or five years, studying its history. For
  14. I watched "Roots" when I was fifteen years old, having absolutely *no* real-life experience to lend the series context - I lived in a sheltered, upper-middle class suburb, and had absolutely no exposure to any of this, except what I was taught in school. Having recently watched movies such as "Django Unchained," "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" "Do the Right Thing," and "12 Years a Slave," I thought it was high time for *me* to do the right thing, and get back to the roots of all these movies - the original 1977 miniseries, which caused an incredible stir when it was released. It was hard
  15. A series of posts here in dr.com ( TV piece on Con Thien and a discussion about My Lai with researched comments by Brian R (that I appreciated) about the Vietnam conflict and a recent series of articles in the NYTimes has reawakened me to the Vietnam period: The most recent article in the NYTimes: The Grunts War by Kyle Longley a Professor of History and Political Science at Arizona State University Longley has studied and published extensively on the Vietnam period. I turned draft eligible during the conflict, received a student deferment and by the time the US involvement in th
  16. I suspect most people don't have direct recall of the 1824 U.S. Presidential Election, but it was (so far) a unique clusterfuck, never yet repeated ... but it *could* be. Whether they know it or not, many people today are discussing the 12th Amendment, which was ratified on Jun 15, 1804. The 12th Amendment is our current system of electing Presidents, and each President since 1804 has been elected using it. The full text of the 12th Amendment is included at the bottom of this post, and the key provision as applied to the 1824 election is the first sentence of the third paragraph. In
  17. I'm not sure how often The Washington Post has run full-page editorials before, and surprisingly, I can't find an image of the actual paper online, but this seems very unusual. "Donald Trump is a Unique Threat to American Democracy" on washingtonpost.com --- "Washington Post: Trump is a 'Unique and Present Danger'" by Nikita Vladimirov on thehill.com "Washington Post Editorial Calls Donald Trump 'A Unique Danger' to Democracy" by Paul Singer on usatoday.com
  18. It is unbelievable that during my lifetime the "Trusty System" (*not* "Trustee System) of prison administration was legal in the United States, but not much about this country's institutions surprises me anymore. It wasn't until "Gates v. Collier" was decided in 1971 that the Trusty System was abolished. Essentially, the inmates were running the asylum - for real (read the Wikipedia entry above, and your jaw will drop). I'm rewatching "Brubaker," and that's the only reason I've even heard about this crazy method of prison administration. I feel so sorry for prisoners in the South, an
  19. This is only tangentially related to our "Unelected Presidents" thread. Statistics can be made to lie, so let me do so here for dramatic effect: 1789-1841 (52 years) - The first seven U.S. Presidents 1841-1853 (12 years) - The second seven U.S. Presidents This is why, when asked to name the U.S. Presidents, even reasonably well-educated people begin to stumble just after Andrew Jackson, the seventh President. We all know that Abraham Lincoln was #16, but knowing #8-15 is difficult because none were particularly famous (unless you consider Millard Fillmore famous). In one
  20. When I was younger, I felt that Affirmative Action was wrong - that it was just perpetuating the problem of discrimination. Now that I'm older (wiser? kinder? softer?), I see legitimate arguments for both sides. In particular, I see people of color having been financially penalized for centuries, and white people having profited and having accumulated wealth because they had what is essentially free labor. Do we owe black Americans financial compensation for what we, as a society, did to them? Perhaps in the form of Affirmative Action? Even if it means costing a more-qualified white person a
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