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Found 16 results

  1. Peter Gabriel left Genesis mainly because he got tired of clashing so much with Tony Banks. He went on to do some pretty good things. "Humdrum" (1977) "Games Without Frontiers" (1980) "Wallflower" (1982) "San Jacino" (1982) This just scratches the surface....Still, I think the tension of Genesis made for something unusual. But I do love what Pete's done on his own.
  2. Esperanza Spalding - wow. Just listen. Just. Precious (studio) Precious (Live) Apple Blossom (so great, so inventive) - I love, love, love this one. So, if y'all have not figured it out yet, I love music in almost all of its forms. I let my ears do the listening.
  3. A friend, who is always mining for gems musically speaking, turned me on to Ted Hawkins several years ago. I only have one of his recordings. "The Next Hundred Years" is well worth checking out. His voice is somehow warm and sweet yet hardened and haunting. There's definitely a bluesy aspect to his music, but also a lot of folk and soul. I can't really think of anyone quite like him. He was a busker at heart; always reluctant to record his music. One of my favorite tunes is "Strange Conversation": I had a strange conversation My baby called me on the phone She said that your next lover's gonna be the blues And now I'm gonna be gone I like his take on Credence Clearwater Revival's "Long As I Can See The Light": Enjoy!
  4. I love Big Maybelle. I used to have a two-LP compilation of her work that was fantastic. I haven't heard it in probably 20 years (or more), but I recognize this track from it. Thanks for posting it. I must confess I don't remember ever hearing of Sid Wyche, so thanks for your research. Turns out he co-wrote the widely recorded standard "Well all right, okay, you win" and also the mischievous (to put it mildly) "(I Love to Play Your Piano) Baby Let Me Bang Your Box", first released by The Toppers in 1954:
  5. Her live album from the Monterey jazz fest is also excellent. Truly a great artist.
  6. I almost posted this in "Who are you drinking to", but it's probably better here. Maurice White, founder and presiding genius of the group Earth Wind & Fire, died yesterday. They were among the great musical acts of the 1970s. Here's one of their greatest recordings:
  7. One of the greatest and most influential electric guitar-players in the history of electric guitar, his live performances were, well, electrifying: I had the enormous pleasure of catching Freddie King live at the old Jazz Workshop on Boylston Street in Boston, probably about a year after this recording, and man that cat could wail. He had this way of throwing in some really surprising, flawless lick, and then he'd look out at the audience with a sly grin. His set that night was one of the high points of my life. He really tore the house down:
  8. I had been meaning to post something of the Brazilian singer Luciana Souza's weeks ago, and then it slipped my mind. I'll make up for it now. I'd have to say she's my favorite jazz/pop singer working today. "Doralice" (1960, Antí´nio Almeida and Dorival Caymmi) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FawMGW4xygg "Muita Bobeira" (1998, Luciana Souza) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06Xix1XnkLg "Here It Is" (2001, Leonard Cohen and Sharon Robinson) Enjoy.
  9. Peter Murphy left Bauhaus and did his own thing. A friend gave me a listen. Went to see in in 86 or 87 at the old 930 Club (horribly distorted speakers and all) and he was great. A skeleton, but great. "Final Solution" (1986) "My Last Two Weeks" (1988) "The Sweetest Drop" (1992) Not as much a fan as I was back then, but still he did some interesting stuff.
  10. This guy is still an underrated gem still 20 years plus after his last real efforts. Sure he got immediate fame for 'She Blinded Me With Science', but he has a lot of great little tunes. Pulp Culture Budapest by Blimp May the Cube be With You One of our Submarines Screen Kiss Hot Sauce I Love You Goodbye I Live in a Suitcase Beauty of a Dream
  11. "They Say It's Spring" from the 1958 album Give Him the Ooh-La-La. That's Blossom Dearie, piano and vocal; Herb Ellis, guitar; Ray Brown, bass; and Jo Jones, drums. (I don't know if it's true now, or if it was ever true, but it used to be said that Ray Brown was the most-recorded musician of all time. He certainly never wanted for work.)
  12. I posted a link to Etta James singing "The Very Thought of You" from her beautiful "Mystery Lady" album over in the Carmen McRae thread. Here's another great track from the same album, "How Deep Is The Ocean." I totally love this album and can't say enough nice things about it: Here, on the other hand, is Etta James doing the kind of thing she was better known for, tearing up Otis Redding's "I Got The Will." I hate to use the word "apotheosis" again so soon, but if this ain't apotheosis, I don't know what is:
  13. Carmen McRae was a great jazz musician, not merely a singer. Here she sings "Round Midnight," the Thelonious Monk tune. Carmen was a life-long advocate for Monk's work. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzX_4ncaNjs
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