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Found 78 results

  1. I'm thinking about my options of getting to/from DC/NYC - has anyone rented a car in one city, and dropped it off in the other? Amtrak round-trip between the two cities seems to be $88 for economy tickets, or $176 round-trip. Renting a car one-way appears to be about $100 a day (that would be renting at one airport, and dropping it off at another - for example, renting at Reagan, and dropping off at Kennedy). That's a lot of money for a car rental, *but* if you can do what you need to do in one day, and get the car returned within 24 hours, it isn't much more expensive than taking the train. Are there any drawbacks to this that I'm unaware of? I'd like to drop off some things in New York, so a one-way car rental, followed by taking Amtrak on the return trip, would be an ideal situation for me. Having never done this before, I'm wondering if there are any pitfalls that I'm unaware of (tolls, for example - I'd need to remember to bring my EZ-Pass). Thanks in advance if you have any opinions or insight - I thought a one-way drop-off would be more expensive than this, and perhaps it is.
  2. Nov 7, 2017 - "National Gallery of Art Celebrates 25-Year Anniversary of Director Earl A. Powell III; 2019 Retirement Announced" on nga.gov Thank you to Rusty Powell, and congratulations to Kaywin Feldman, who comes in Mar, 2019, from the Minneapolis Institute of Art. "National Gallery of Art Picks Kaywin Feldman as Next Director" on artnews.com
  3. The National Portrait Gallery has commissioned Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald to paint the museum's official portraits of former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama. The two portraits will be unveiled at the museum in early 2018 and will be added to the Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection. Kehinde Wiley received wide acclaim for his touring exhibit "Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic," which appeared at the Brooklyn Museum, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Seattle Art Museum, Phoenix Art Museum, Toledo Museum of Art, and Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Amy Sherald is from Baltimore and is probably best known to DC folks for her First Place painting at The Outwin 2016.
  4. The JPW family will soon be making our annual trek down I95 to Pawleys Island. We'll stop somewhere in NC for some BBQ. Any thoughts on other good places to stop that are not too far from the highway? Mrs JPW was especially interested in some ice cream along the way.
  5. I know it's just shy of Thanksgiving but could y'all chime in where one could go for a festive atmosphere to dine on Christmas Day? Looking for places that are richly saturated with Christmas decor, and lights. The brighter the better. I know several families that will be heading to the District, as well as Baltimore, to celebrate Christmas and are looking for something spectacular! I am thinking that a bunch of hotels will be serving dinner on Christmas, but since I have not lived in the District for some time, I am out of the loop. Food is a factor, but honestly I am just looking for some place festive. If the hospitality delivers, the food will taste better if not solid. Thank you as always for any recco's you may list. Elf, Kat
  6. I've traveled I-95 many times, but I've yet to find any places worth a relatively brief detour between DC and Jacksonville. I've stumbled across a few crummy places, which I've erased from my memory, but I've found only a couple I would recommend. Recently, my college-aged daughter decided to eat a vegetarian diet, and I'll just say that complicated matters ten fold. Smithfield's Chicken and Barbecue is solid, if not spectacular, but their pork sandwiches and chicken represent the NC style fairly well. / (Not for vegetarians unless they will be ok with slaw and hushpuppies). During my most recent trip, we stopped at Broad Street Deli and Market, located in Dunn NC. It's a small town place with friendly service, homemade food, and it's a quick detour from the interstate. Compared to DC prices, it's shockingly inexpensive. Lunch for two was just over $16. On the southbound leg, I made a detour into Florence to try Wholly Smokin', where I sampled SC's version of bbq. The pulled pork was well cooked and moist, but overly salty for my tastes. The mustard sauce couldn't really save it. The sides, though, were excellent; baked beans were tangy, and not overly sweet, while the corn and lima beans were fresh and delicious. I would have like to explore more of the menu--perhaps next time. Service was genuinely nice, and it was a good pick to relax for a bit. I'd really enjoy hearing about great spots along the way.
  7. Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018 November 9, 2018 - May 5, 2019 "Disrupting Craft presents the work of Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco, four artists who challenge the conventional definitions of craft by imbuing it with a renewed sense of emotional purpose, inclusiveness, and activism. The four artists work in an expansive variety of media including ceramics, wood, and fibers. They all share a dedication to social justice and to interrogating cultural identities and established historical narratives. By exploiting the conceptual toolkits of craft, they develop responses to the contemporary political landscape while also analyzing and challenging their own cultural histories."
  8. Kadir Nelson's portrait of Henrietta Lacks will be on display on the National Portrait Gallery's presentation wall until November 4, 2018. The portrait is a co-acquisition by the Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. "Lacks (1920 – 1951), whose great-great-grandmother was an enslaved person, lost her life to cervical cancer at age 31. During her treatment, doctors took cells from her body and discovered they lived long lives and reproduced indefinitely in test tubes. These “immortal” HeLa cells have since contributed to over 10,000 medical patents, aiding research and benefiting patients with polio, AIDS, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions. Considering the history of medical testing on African Americans without their permission, the fate of Lacks raises questions about ethics, privacy and race. Addressing those issues forthrightly, Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, prompted Oprah Winfrey and HBO to explore her story on film. Commissioned by HBO, Nelson used visual elements to convey Lacks’ legacy. The wallpaper features the “Flower of Life,” a symbol of immortality; the flowers on her dress recall images of cell structures; and two missing buttons allude to the cells taken from her body without permission."
  9. This just same across my email - should be interesting: "Bon Appetit! Michelin to Launch First-Ever D.C. Guide" by Rebecca Cooper on bizjournals.com
  10. I received voting information from the DC Board of Elections the other day but didn't really pay much attention to it. I did notice there were a couple of ballot initiatives up for vote. Then today, the DC restaurant industry launched a PR campaign (I noticed it on Instagram) voicing their opposition to Ballot Initiative 77. Some pretty big names in the business are on the No list, including Aaron Silverman, Jeremiah Langhorne (The Dabney), the Tail Up Goat folks, Sebastian Zutant/Lauren Winter, Cedric Maupillier, the Trabocchis, to name a few. In the spirit of Equal Time: Here is the No argument: Vote No 77 One Fair Wage, the Yes campaign being lead by Restaurant Opportunities Center United. Stories from: WAMU. Washingtonian
  11. To kick-off the countdown of the upcoming grand opening of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) the museum will be projecting images from its collection on the building facade. Three nights only, Nov. 16, 17, 18 from 5:30pm to 9pm.
  12. Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes On view November 8, 2018 through January 27, 2019 "The largest US museum survey of this pioneering artist to date, Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes features more than thirty large-scale paintings that reveal the artist’s considerable influence in the field of contemporary art. One of the most inventive artists working today, von Heyl has earned international acclaim for continually rethinking the possibilities of contemporary painting. Her cerebral yet deeply visceral artworks upend longstanding assumptions about composition, beauty, and narrative. Drawing inspiration from a vast and surprising array of sources—including literature, pop culture, metaphysics, and personal history—von Heyl creates paintings that are seemingly familiar yet impossible to classify, offering, in her words, “a new image that stands for itself as fact.” In studios in New York and Marfa, Texas, von Heyl combines a rigorous, process-based practice that demands each painting develop through the act of painting, itself. The spellbinding results invite you to explore a unique visual language, exuberant and insistent. Organized in collaboration with the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, this major multinational exhibition highlights the artist’s groundbreaking artistic output since 2005, including recent works that point to new developments in her constantly evolving practice. Together, Snake Eyes shines an international spotlight on one of today’s most dynamic painters and demonstrates the vitality and limitless possibilities of painting."
  13. One thing nearly every visitor to the National Gallery of Art sees upon entering is the bronze statue of "Mercury" in the rotunda, pointing up at the domed ceiling. Nobody knows who sculpted this, and very few people know the sculptor after whom it was sculpted: Giovanni Bologna. But if you click on that Wikipedia link, you'll see that the more-proper name is "Giambologna." Not only does this translate to "John Baloney," but it also almost-translates to "Ham Baloney." Either of the above two interpretations could be sung to the tune of "My Sharona." People think running a website is difficult, but it isn't so bad once you get the Knack for doing it. "Mercury" on nga.gov
  14. I think Thomas Boswell is one of DC's greatest sportswriters - he is one of the people at the Post whom I look forward to reading whenever I can. Basically, I have nothing negative to say about him. One question, though: I remember back in 1997 when Mark McGwire was chasing Roger Maris, someone for the Post called McGwire "Our Babe Ruth." Shortly thereafter, the legendary Shirley Povich (1905-1998), sports editor since *1925*, took issue with the comment, saying something along the lines of: "Now hold on just a cotton-pickin' minute there!" etc. That's a little embellished, but the general tone is intact. Does anyone remember if this was in rebuttal to Boswell (as opposed to someone else), and what, if anything, was Boswell's response? It was a great little back-and-forth.
  15. After a far-too-long layoff, the New York Avenue Sculpture Project is back, featuring Mexico City-based sculptor Betsabeé Romero (b. 1963). This project is organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts in collaboration with the DowntownDC Business Improvement District (BID), the DC Office of Planning and other local agencies. The project will run from Sept. 28, 2018, through Sept. 20, 2020 along NY Ave at 13th Street, NW outside the NMWA building.
  16. There are some truly great quotes in this column from two men who clearly had the utmost of respect for one another. Cobb's quote about the first time he ever laid eyes on Johnson is hysterical. "Ty Cobb Talks About the Greatest Pitcher he Ever Faced" by J. Conrad Guest on detroitathletic.com
  17. Summer museum exhibits will be opening soon! Heavy Metal—Women to Watch 2018 on view June 28–September 16, 2018 "Heavy Metal, the fifth installment in NMWA’s Women to Watch exhibition series, showcases contemporary artists working in metal. The exhibition series is presented every two to three years and is a dynamic collaboration between the museum and participating outreach committees. The 20 committees participating in Women to Watch 2018 worked with curators in their respective regions to create shortlists of artists working with metal. From this list, NMWA curators selected the artists whose work is on view in Heavy Metal. Featured artists in Heavy Metal investigate the physical properties and expressive possibilities of metalwork through a wide variety of objects, including sculpture, jewelry, and conceptual forms. Works in the exhibition range from large-scale installations to small objects intended for personal adornment; these disparate works are fashioned out of iron, steel, bronze, silver, gold, brass, tin, aluminum, copper, and pewter. This exhibition seeks to disrupt the predominantly masculine narrative that surrounds metalworking and demonstrate that contemporary women artists carry on a vibrant legacy in the field. The exhibition features works by Cheryl Eve Acosta (Greater Kansas City Area), Rana Begum (United Kingdom), Carolina Rieckhof Brommer (Peru), Lola Brooks (Georgia), Paula Castillo (New Mexico), Charlotte Charbonnel (France), Venetia Dale (Massachusetts), Petronella Eriksson (Sweden), Susie Ganch (Mid-Atlantic Region), Alice Hope (Greater New York Region), Leila Khoury (Ohio), Holly Laws (Arkansas), Blanca Muñoz (Spain), Beverly Penn (Texas), Serena Porrati (Italy), Alejandra Prieto (Chile), Kerianne Quick (Southern California), Carolina Sardi (Florida), Katherine Vetne (Northern California), and Kelsey Wishik (Mississippi)."
  18. I wanted to invite anyone who happens to be in the area to my son's clarinet recital in Bloomington, IN on Feb 27, 2017. "Matt Plays Things #1" The Program: Francaix: Theme and Variations Schumann: Fantasiestücke Bernstein: Sonata Rossini: Introduction Theme and Variations For those not in the area, this may be podcasted - I'll update the thread if I find out anything.
  19. For all you Burners out there: No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man "Each year in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, a city of more than 75,000 people rises out of the dust for a single week. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected and many are ritually burned to the ground. The thriving temporary metropolis known as Burning Man is a hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its principles of radical self-expression, decommodification, communal participation, and reverence for the handmade. Both a cultural movement and an annual event, Burning Man remains one of the most influential phenomenons in contemporary American art and culture. No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man brings the large-scale, participatory work from this desert gathering to the nation’s capital for the first time. The exhibition takes over the entire Renwick Gallery building and surrounding neighborhood, bringing alive the maker culture and creative spirit of this cultural movement."
  20. A new year brings new openings. Hung Liu In Print "Hung Liu In Print invites viewers to explore the relationship between the artist’s multi-layered paintings and the palpable, physical qualities of her works on paper. To make her prints, Liu (b.1948) uses an array of printing and collage techniques, developing highly textured surfaces, veils of color, and screens of drip marks that transform the figures in each composition. Describing printmaking as “poetry,” she emphasizes the spontaneity of the layering process, which allows each image to build organically with each successive layer. Before immigrating to California in 1984, Liu grew up during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in China, where she worked alongside fieldworkers and trained as a painter. Adapting figures from historical Chinese photographs, Liu reimagines antique depictions of laborers, refugees, and prostitutes. Her multifaceted oeuvre probes the human condition and confronts issues of culture, identity, and personal and national history. Best known as a painter, Liu ably translates the “weeping realism” that characterizes her canvases into the medium of prints. This focus exhibition highlights selected prints from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts as well as the artist’s related tapestry designs."
  21. I have been wanting to see the Obama portraits for some time now, so I decided last week to head to the National Portrait Gallery. Despite the crowds gathered on the steps for a pre-Capitals hockey playoff game concert, the inside of the gallery was quite empty, and I didn't have to stand in long lines to see either of these two magnificent paintings. After viewing these portraits, I stumbled upon an extremely powerful exhibit, "UnSeen, Our Past in a New Light," featuring works by contemporary artists Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar. The installation addresses the under- and misrepresentation of certain minorities in American history and in art, and illuminates the unheralded contributions made by American minorities. The display, which runs through Jan. 6, 2019, is visually stunning and emotionally charged. I highly recommend seeing this moving exhibit. If you go, don't miss "Black Out, Silhouettes Then and Now," on display until March 10, 2019.
  22. I'm curious to hear peoples' takes on the Corcoran Gallery of Art and its closure. Above all else, I think that last year's dissolution of the Corcoran is the single-biggest loss to hit Washington, DC since ... when? The College of Art and Design, the $200 million Beaux Arts Building, and $50 million in cash went to George Washington University - does anyone have a well-written backstory as to *why* this already-rich college got such an enormous windfall? The 17,000 artworks, valued at $2 billion, were given to the National Gallery of Art. While I think that's wonderful, it also justifies a new building - are there any plans to either buy or construct one? The Corcoran collection could be a huge draw for whatever location they decide to put it in - from Feb 7, 2015 through May 3, 2015, three galleries in the NGA West Building were jam-packed with Corcoran treasures, and while this was certainly a treat for NGA visitors, something must be done in the long term in order to give these works of art their proper due. How much would something like this mean, for example, to Prince George's County? It would certainly lure me and my wallet out that way.
  23. I remember when "Good to Go" was released in 1986 - I knew nothing about Go-Go, other than the posters (white background, pastel rectangles with black typeface) advertising concerts at the DC Armory (does anyone else remember these? I had just moved back to the DC area after spending nearly seven years roaming the country, and I was oblivious), and what I saw on "Soul of the City" with "The Moonman" (I can't find *any* internet entries for these - "Soul of the City" was Channel 20's poor-man's version of "Soul Train," and "The Moonman" was its version of Don Cornelius). What I don't want to be is a white person pretending I'm black (we've had enough restaurant critics doing this); what I *do* want to be is a white person acknowledging the rich heritage of this city's primarily black, 1980's population, and the incredibly important (oh, you don't know it's important yet?) influence of Go-Go, Trouble Funk, and Chuck Brown. When I say "incredibly important" ... it isn't ... yet, but I can hear - with my own ears - this influential style in today's rap, hip-hop, and whatever else you want to call popular music, and many of the roots were planted right here, in DC, less than forty-years ago. In the first seven (seven!) minutes of "Good to Go" (which was pulled from the shelves shortly after its launch, and renamed "Short Fuse"), you get scenes of an inner-city black youth, toting around his conga drum, and (this is why it was pulled from the shelves) the scenery includes The Washington Monument, The White House, a meeting inside The Watergate (really), and of all things, that nasty, concrete staircase that only upper-middle-class, white hikers, cough, embarking on The Capital Crescent Trail, neart its trailhead, close to the origin of the Whitehurst Freeway, knew about, as it was the only way to traverse Canal Road (the map of it is right here). Yes, there was a meeting there between two drug dealers - this is all in the first seven minutes of the film - they must have phoned each other, and said, "Let's travel 45 minutes each way into lower Georgetown, and have a 30-second meeting in that nasty concrete stairwell." Somewhere in this world, about four people are laughing right now. Well, I haven't watched the entire film (yet); just dribs-and-drabs, but it all streams for free right here on YouTube. As insane as it sounds, "Good to Go" is an important film, or will be, at least on a cult basis: I remember when the impossibly lame "The Big Chill" came out, three-years before "Good to Go" did - I protested the quality of the movie *loudly*, but everyone, and I do mean *everyone*, always replied, "But the *music*!" Rubbish. The film is lame, and the music is just as lame - cherry-picked to appeal to aging yuppies. At least with "Good to Go," fans of the genre can say, "the *music*!" and not hang their heads in shame: The opening theme alone is fresher and more original than anything "The Big Chill" has to offer ("Good to Go" could be on the Rolling Stone's Top 100 List of greatest and/or most-influential contemporary songs in history - other than pure rebellion, why is "God Save the Queen" any better than this?). Sanitized or not, "Good to Go" is probably going to be what Go-Go is best remembered for being (it isn't a dying genre, so much as a genre that has melted into other genres; pure Go-Go has come-and-gone with the crack-ridden DC of the 1980s, Marion Barry, etc. - that's not a racist statement; it's a historical statement, and it's true). "Good to Go" was made on a $1.5 million budget, and I think I remember reading once that Art Garfunkel's salary was half of the film's budget! Don't quote me on this, but it was either some crazy-high percentage, or he decided to forego being paid, or something odd like that. That said, Robert DoQui is in this film also, and he was a known actor at the time; Wikipedia incorrectly lists Anjelica Huston in the credits (and sent me on a wild goose chase, looking for a cameo!), but the actual actress' name was Angelica Houston. The "Most Awkward Performance" award goes to Michael White, who played Gil Colton (the national-level music rep, whom local rep Robert DoQui is soliciting at the Watergate) - he has a pretty big role in this film, and is as stiff as a board. Anyway, here's the film (for now): If anyone doesn't hear shades of "Rapper's Delight" in the song played around the 25-minute mark (or, a much closer match, the Chicago Bears' "Super Bowl Shuffle," which was undoubtedly influenced by this), listen again.
  24. I could not decide where this post should sit. Don: Place it elsewhere if you think it should reside in a different section. Honestly though it seems to me to transcend the sections of the blog as presently constituted. These vital andintrepid and souls from the DC area decided to visit and rate Deli's from NY to DC and in between. Four of them visiting multiple deli's in a day at times. The research stretches from 2010 to this year. NYC, Northern Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore and DC. Multiple delis. Multiple sandwiches and side orders. Tight parameters. Repetitive tastings of the same base foods. A noble task. I salute them. Here are their evaluations/ratings/reviews on the entire list of 48 delis There are background details to various trips and tastings by clicking on various links. Spectacular research!!!!! (never in a million years would I attempt such an effort but I salute the sacrifice and magnificent effort of these gentlemen!!!!!!)
  25. I grew up reading about Anthony "Jo Jo" Hunter in the Sports pages, watched him win the MVP Award in the 1976 Capital Classic, and then had season tickets to the University of Maryland games, where he was a minor star, but never reached his full potential. Sometime in 2007 - "Set Him Free! - The Jo Jo Hunter Story" by Ryan Thorburn on dcbasketball.com Jan 16, 2013 - "The Comeback" by Dave McKenna on grantland.com Is this true?! If so, why haven't I heard *anything* about it? The only reason I found it is because I was doing some research to start a thread about Hunter. I'm not sure I believe it, because I can't find anything else about it, anywhere. Can anyone verify that Jo Jo Hunter is still with us? I would NOT assume the above link is true, as I cannot find *any* confirmation of it, and the local basketball community would have chimed in. <--- NOT true Notice also that the numeric date on that website says 5/23/2017, but the written date says April 23, 2017 - given that I cannot find anything else about it, this almost looks like one of his friends was playing a joke on him (maybe someone beat him in one-on-one on that date, and was taunting him?) More importantly, note that Hunter was absolutely not born in 1962 - if he played in the 1976 Capital Classic, he was born in the late 1950s: I can promise that he's older than I am, and I was born in 1961.
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