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Found 86 results

  1. The always popular orchid exhibit is back, taking over the Kogod Courtyard (!) Orchids: Amazing Adaptations Escape the winter cold and step into a floral oasis in the Kogod Courtyard with Orchids: Amazing Adaptations. A joint collaboration with SAAM, the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Gardens, and the U.S. Botanic Garden, this installation fills the museums’ courtyard with hundreds of orchids of stunning variety. Did you know that orchids are found on every continent except Antarctica? The gorgeous presentation showcases how orchids have adapted to their many different environments.
  2. Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse On view November 1, 2018 through April 28, 2019. "In the Hirshhorn’s largest interactive technology exhibition to date, three major installations from Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Pulse series will come together for the artist’s DC debut. A Mexican Canadian artist known for straddling the line between art, technology, and design, Lozano-Hemmer will fill the Museum’s entire Second Level with immersive environments that use heart-rate sensors to create kinetic and audiovisual experiences from visitors’ own biometric data. Over the course of six months, Pulse will animate the vital signs of hundreds of thousands of participants. With Lozano-Hemmer’s trademark sensitivities to audience engagement and architectural scale, each installation captures biometric signatures and visualizes them as repetitive sequences of flashing lights, panning soundscapes, rippling waves, and animated fingerprints. These intimate “portraits,” or “snapshots,” of electrical activity are then added to a live archive of prior recordings to create an environment of syncopated rhythms. At a time when biometry is increasingly used for identification and control, this data constitutes a new way of representing both anonymity and community. While reflecting on the upcoming exhibition, Hirshhorn Director Melissa Chiu offered the following: “Lozano-Hemmer will activate the Museum like never before…His hypnotic installations invite museum visitors to participate in a one-of-a-kind experience while addressing complex themes surrounding agency, mortality, and ownership.” The exhibition begins with Pulse Index (2010), which will be presented at its largest scale to date. The work records participants’ fingerprints at the same time as it detects their heart rates, displaying data from the last 10,000 users on a scaled grid of massive projections. The second work, Pulse Tank (2008), which premiered at Prospect.1, New Orleans Biennial, will be updated and expanded for this new exhibition. Sensors will turn your pulse into ripples on illuminated water tanks, creating ever-changing patterns that will be reflected on the gallery walls. Pulse Room (2006) rounds out the exhibition. The final installation features hundreds of clear, incandescent light bulbs hanging from the ceiling in even rows, pulsing with the heartbeats of past visitors. You can add your heartbeat to the installation by touching a sensor, which transmits your pulse to the first bulb. Additional heartbeats continue to register on the first bulb, advancing earlier recordings ahead one bulb at a time. The sound of the collected heartbeats will join the light display to amplify the physical impact of the installation. Six short documentaries of Pulse works will also be exhibited, showing the breadth of the series through video footage of various other biometric public-art interventions in Abu Dhabi, Toronto, Hobart, New York, and Urdaibai, Spain (2007–2015)."
  3. Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes On view November 8, 2018 through January 27, 2019 "The largest US museum survey of this pioneering artist to date, Charline von Heyl: Snake Eyes features more than thirty large-scale paintings that reveal the artist’s considerable influence in the field of contemporary art. One of the most inventive artists working today, von Heyl has earned international acclaim for continually rethinking the possibilities of contemporary painting. Her cerebral yet deeply visceral artworks upend longstanding assumptions about composition, beauty, and narrative. Drawing inspiration from a vast and surprising array of sources—including literature, pop culture, metaphysics, and personal history—von Heyl creates paintings that are seemingly familiar yet impossible to classify, offering, in her words, “a new image that stands for itself as fact.” In studios in New York and Marfa, Texas, von Heyl combines a rigorous, process-based practice that demands each painting develop through the act of painting, itself. The spellbinding results invite you to explore a unique visual language, exuberant and insistent. Organized in collaboration with the Deichtorhallen Hamburg, this major multinational exhibition highlights the artist’s groundbreaking artistic output since 2005, including recent works that point to new developments in her constantly evolving practice. Together, Snake Eyes shines an international spotlight on one of today’s most dynamic painters and demonstrates the vitality and limitless possibilities of painting."
  4. Carolina Mayorga: PINK Ranchos and Other Ephemeral Zip Codes "The Organization of American States (OAS) AMA | Art Museum of the Americas proudly presents PINK Ranchos and Other Ephemeral Zip Codes, an exhibition of new work by Colombian-American artist Carolina Mayorga, in dialog with AMA’s permanent collection. Through this series of interconnected works, Mayorga invites the audience to enter a PINK-mented reality and experience her bi-cultural interpretations of those living inside ranchos, cambuches, shelters and other ephemeral zip codes. This site-specific multimedia project is the result of a year of artistic investigation on issues of home and homelessness and the artist’s infatuation with PINK. By applying the pigment to women and children (characters typically associated with home), memories of her native Colombia, 14 years of residency in Washington, DC and AMA’s permanent collection, she has created a pleasing environment to contrast the experiences of those living in exile, displacement, dislocation, relocation, and eviction."
  5. Zilia Sánchez: Soy Isla (I Am an Island) "The Phillips Collection presents the first museum retrospective of Cuban artist Zilia Sánchez (b. 1926, Havana). This long-overdue exhibition examines the artist’s prolific yet largely unknown career that spans almost 70 years, featuring more than 60 works including paintings, works on paper, shaped canvases, and sculptural pieces, alongside illustrations, design sketches, and ephemera. The exhibition traces Sánchez’s artistic journey from her early days in Cuba to her extended visits to Europe and residence in New York, and finally her move to Puerto Rico, where she now lives and works. Many of Sánchez’s works reference protagonists from ancient mythology (such as Trojans, Amazonians, and Antigone—all warriors and female heroines). Others have reoccurring motifs of lunar shapes, erotic topologies, and tattoo drawings that map physical and psychological spaces and add another dimension to her curvilinear geometry, rich with metaphorical meaning. The exhibition title, I Am an Island, serves as a personal metaphor for Sanchez's experience as an islander—connected to and disconnected from both the mainland and mainstream art currents."
  6. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975 How the Vietnam War changed American art "By the late 1960s, the United States was in pitched conflict both in Vietnam, against a foreign power, and at home—between Americans for and against the war, for and against the social status quo. Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965–1975 presents art created amidst this turmoil—between the time of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s fateful decision to deploy U.S. ground troops to South Vietnam in 1965 and the fall of Saigon ten years later. Artists Respond brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists and artist groups of the period, including Asco, Corita Kent, Edward Kienholz, Rupert García, Leon Golub, Hans Haacke, David Hammons, Kim Jones, Yoko Ono, Martha Rosler, Carolee Schneemann and Nancy Spero. Galvanized by the moral urgency of the Vietnam War, these artists reimagined the goals and uses of art, affecting developments in multiple movements and media: painting, sculpture, printmaking, performance and body art, installation, documentary art and conceptualism. The exhibition presents an era in which artists endeavored to respond to the turbulent times and participated in a process of free and open questioning inherent to American civic life." Washington Post article
  7. File this away for future visits to the Newseum: Online tickets are 15% off (substantial when you consider general admission is $24.95). Even at full price, this museum is worth the admission - I suspect attendance is dropping off, and it may not be around forever. Also, the tickets include the "next day free" - useful for those (like me!) who quickly develop Museum Fatigue. I went back for the second consecutive day yesterday, and I'm glad I did (I combined day two with a trip to the National Archives - nothing like strolling down the street to see the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, an original copy of the Magna Carta, and the Emancipation Proclamation. These documents aren't terribly beautiful, but just being in their presence is positively awe-inspiring). Make sure to follow their suggested itinerary: Go downstairs to the bottom floor, look around (make sure to see the FBI exhibit down there), then take the extraordinary hydraulic elevators (the largest cars in the world, I believe) up to the 6th floor (where you can go outside onto a large balcony, giving you perhaps the best views in all of Washington, DC), and work your way down a floor at a time. Must-sees include the 9/11 exhibit, the Pulitzer Prize Photos exhibit (one in particular cut deeply into my psyche - a starving child, who collapsed on the way to a food-relief center in South Sudan, with a vulture just sitting there, waiting - do not click on this if it will bother you, and it might). The famous photo of South Vietnamese Police Chief Loan is there - believe it or not, he ran a *PIZZA PARLOR* in Burke, Virginia, called "Les Trois Continents," for fourteen years, until his identity was made known, and was forced to close down. (I couldn't believe it when I first heard this, but I verified it to be true.) There's a strong exhibit about the Kennedy family, in honor of JFK's 100th birthday, but I'm a little "Kennedy'd-out" of late, so I didn't spend too much time there). Also, there's a 100-foot-wide movie screen which I didn't get to see, but you should check on its schedule. And if you've never seen pieces of the Berlin Wall (which started going up the very night I was born!), they have the largest display of it in the Western Hemisphere, alongside an intimidating, three-story, guard tower. I'm probably missing a couple of things, but this list is a pretty good starting itinerary. I remember so well when this museum was in Rosslyn (it opened there in 1997, and moved to its present location in 2008) - it was small, free, and really amazing even then - the outside portion was something people often stumbled upon by accident - but now it has had some serious money pumped into it, and is a major tourist attraction in DC.
  8. Be advised that NMWA will be reinstalling their third floor collection from Dec. 17 until Dec. 28 (*). With more than 5,000 works in their collection, it's time to hang some new stuff! During this time, the Rodarte and Ambreen Butt exhibits will be open. Both are worth seeing. (*) "Gallery Reboot: Collection Galleries Closed December 17-28" on blog.nmwa.org
  9. Mackin was a basketball factory which produced greats such as Austin Carr (1968), Keith Herron (1974), Duck Williams (1974), Jo Jo Hunter (1976), Johnny Dawkins (1981), and Dominic Pressley (1982). The school closed in 1989, but not before spending twenty years alongside Dematha, Dunbar, St. Johns, and Eastern as the elite basketball school of DC.
  10. The Washington Post put out a job bulletin on Jan 9 for a full-time editorial aide in the Food Department - here are the details: http://washpostpr.tumblr.com/post/181871163617/job-posting-food-editorial-aide
  11. Nov 7, 2017 - "National Gallery of Art Celebrates 25-Year Anniversary of Director Earl A. Powell III; 2019 Retirement Announced" on nga.gov Thank you to Rusty Powell, and congratulations to Kaywin Feldman, who comes in Mar, 2019, from the Minneapolis Institute of Art. "National Gallery of Art Picks Kaywin Feldman as Next Director" on artnews.com
  12. This human pogo stick deserves his own thread. I can think of three unstoppable shots off the top of my head in NBA history: Elvin Hayes backing in to the basket on his strong side, then turning around and shooting a fadeaway bank shot; Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's sky hook, and Kevin Durant's jump-back from 25 feet. Critics say all he needs to become the "total offensive weapon" is to put on some upper-body muscle; I disagree. Let him wait until later to muscle up; right now, he's so quick that he can do anything - drive past you and tomahawk it, or back off and shoot a three. When he's in his 30s, then he can hit the weights - let him stay slender while he's young. The only comparable player I can think of, style-wise, is Dirk Nowitzki. Tonight, he broke his string of 12 consecutive 30-point games, and he did it by scoring 24 points, going 10-for-12 from the field, sitting out the entire 4th quarter, and dishing out 7 assists - many of them to Serge Ibaka who went 12-for-12 from the field: the two combined to go 22-for-24! This is just crazy what we're witnessing right now. Jordan, Bryant, Maravich, Erving, Bird, James - I've never seen more jaw-dropping highlight reels (although some of Jordan's and Bird's come close). All Durant needs is longevity, and he could well become the NBA's all-time leading scorer.
  13. To kick-off the countdown of the upcoming grand opening of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) the museum will be projecting images from its collection on the building facade. Three nights only, Nov. 16, 17, 18 from 5:30pm to 9pm.
  14. I'm thinking about my options of getting to/from DC/NYC - has anyone rented a car in one city, and dropped it off in the other? Amtrak round-trip between the two cities seems to be $88 for economy tickets, or $176 round-trip. Renting a car one-way appears to be about $100 a day (that would be renting at one airport, and dropping it off at another - for example, renting at Reagan, and dropping off at Kennedy). That's a lot of money for a car rental, *but* if you can do what you need to do in one day, and get the car returned within 24 hours, it isn't much more expensive than taking the train. Are there any drawbacks to this that I'm unaware of? I'd like to drop off some things in New York, so a one-way car rental, followed by taking Amtrak on the return trip, would be an ideal situation for me. Having never done this before, I'm wondering if there are any pitfalls that I'm unaware of (tolls, for example - I'd need to remember to bring my EZ-Pass). Thanks in advance if you have any opinions or insight - I thought a one-way drop-off would be more expensive than this, and perhaps it is.
  15. The National Portrait Gallery has commissioned Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald to paint the museum's official portraits of former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama. The two portraits will be unveiled at the museum in early 2018 and will be added to the Portrait Gallery’s permanent collection. Kehinde Wiley received wide acclaim for his touring exhibit "Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic," which appeared at the Brooklyn Museum, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Seattle Art Museum, Phoenix Art Museum, Toledo Museum of Art, and Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Amy Sherald is from Baltimore and is probably best known to DC folks for her First Place painting at The Outwin 2016.
  16. The JPW family will soon be making our annual trek down I95 to Pawleys Island. We'll stop somewhere in NC for some BBQ. Any thoughts on other good places to stop that are not too far from the highway? Mrs JPW was especially interested in some ice cream along the way.
  17. I know it's just shy of Thanksgiving but could y'all chime in where one could go for a festive atmosphere to dine on Christmas Day? Looking for places that are richly saturated with Christmas decor, and lights. The brighter the better. I know several families that will be heading to the District, as well as Baltimore, to celebrate Christmas and are looking for something spectacular! I am thinking that a bunch of hotels will be serving dinner on Christmas, but since I have not lived in the District for some time, I am out of the loop. Food is a factor, but honestly I am just looking for some place festive. If the hospitality delivers, the food will taste better if not solid. Thank you as always for any recco's you may list. Elf, Kat
  18. I've traveled I-95 many times, but I've yet to find any places worth a relatively brief detour between DC and Jacksonville. I've stumbled across a few crummy places, which I've erased from my memory, but I've found only a couple I would recommend. Recently, my college-aged daughter decided to eat a vegetarian diet, and I'll just say that complicated matters ten fold. Smithfield's Chicken and Barbecue is solid, if not spectacular, but their pork sandwiches and chicken represent the NC style fairly well. / (Not for vegetarians unless they will be ok with slaw and hushpuppies). During my most recent trip, we stopped at Broad Street Deli and Market, located in Dunn NC. It's a small town place with friendly service, homemade food, and it's a quick detour from the interstate. Compared to DC prices, it's shockingly inexpensive. Lunch for two was just over $16. On the southbound leg, I made a detour into Florence to try Wholly Smokin', where I sampled SC's version of bbq. The pulled pork was well cooked and moist, but overly salty for my tastes. The mustard sauce couldn't really save it. The sides, though, were excellent; baked beans were tangy, and not overly sweet, while the corn and lima beans were fresh and delicious. I would have like to explore more of the menu--perhaps next time. Service was genuinely nice, and it was a good pick to relax for a bit. I'd really enjoy hearing about great spots along the way.
  19. Disrupting Craft: Renwick Invitational 2018 November 9, 2018 - May 5, 2019 "Disrupting Craft presents the work of Tanya Aguiñiga, Sharif Bey, Dustin Farnsworth, and Stephanie Syjuco, four artists who challenge the conventional definitions of craft by imbuing it with a renewed sense of emotional purpose, inclusiveness, and activism. The four artists work in an expansive variety of media including ceramics, wood, and fibers. They all share a dedication to social justice and to interrogating cultural identities and established historical narratives. By exploiting the conceptual toolkits of craft, they develop responses to the contemporary political landscape while also analyzing and challenging their own cultural histories."
  20. Kadir Nelson's portrait of Henrietta Lacks will be on display on the National Portrait Gallery's presentation wall until November 4, 2018. The portrait is a co-acquisition by the Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. "Lacks (1920 – 1951), whose great-great-grandmother was an enslaved person, lost her life to cervical cancer at age 31. During her treatment, doctors took cells from her body and discovered they lived long lives and reproduced indefinitely in test tubes. These “immortal” HeLa cells have since contributed to over 10,000 medical patents, aiding research and benefiting patients with polio, AIDS, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions. Considering the history of medical testing on African Americans without their permission, the fate of Lacks raises questions about ethics, privacy and race. Addressing those issues forthrightly, Rebecca Skloot’s 2010 book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, prompted Oprah Winfrey and HBO to explore her story on film. Commissioned by HBO, Nelson used visual elements to convey Lacks’ legacy. The wallpaper features the “Flower of Life,” a symbol of immortality; the flowers on her dress recall images of cell structures; and two missing buttons allude to the cells taken from her body without permission."
  21. This just same across my email - should be interesting: "Bon Appetit! Michelin to Launch First-Ever D.C. Guide" by Rebecca Cooper on bizjournals.com
  22. I received voting information from the DC Board of Elections the other day but didn't really pay much attention to it. I did notice there were a couple of ballot initiatives up for vote. Then today, the DC restaurant industry launched a PR campaign (I noticed it on Instagram) voicing their opposition to Ballot Initiative 77. Some pretty big names in the business are on the No list, including Aaron Silverman, Jeremiah Langhorne (The Dabney), the Tail Up Goat folks, Sebastian Zutant/Lauren Winter, Cedric Maupillier, the Trabocchis, to name a few. In the spirit of Equal Time: Here is the No argument: Vote No 77 One Fair Wage, the Yes campaign being lead by Restaurant Opportunities Center United. Stories from: WAMU. Washingtonian
  23. One thing nearly every visitor to the National Gallery of Art sees upon entering is the bronze statue of "Mercury" in the rotunda, pointing up at the domed ceiling. Nobody knows who sculpted this, and very few people know the sculptor after whom it was sculpted: Giovanni Bologna. But if you click on that Wikipedia link, you'll see that the more-proper name is "Giambologna." Not only does this translate to "John Baloney," but it also almost-translates to "Ham Baloney." Either of the above two interpretations could be sung to the tune of "My Sharona." People think running a website is difficult, but it isn't so bad once you get the Knack for doing it. "Mercury" on nga.gov
  24. I think Thomas Boswell is one of DC's greatest sportswriters - he is one of the people at the Post whom I look forward to reading whenever I can. Basically, I have nothing negative to say about him. One question, though: I remember back in 1997 when Mark McGwire was chasing Roger Maris, someone for the Post called McGwire "Our Babe Ruth." Shortly thereafter, the legendary Shirley Povich (1905-1998), sports editor since *1925*, took issue with the comment, saying something along the lines of: "Now hold on just a cotton-pickin' minute there!" etc. That's a little embellished, but the general tone is intact. Does anyone remember if this was in rebuttal to Boswell (as opposed to someone else), and what, if anything, was Boswell's response? It was a great little back-and-forth.
  25. After a far-too-long layoff, the New York Avenue Sculpture Project is back, featuring Mexico City-based sculptor Betsabeé Romero (b. 1963). This project is organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts in collaboration with the DowntownDC Business Improvement District (BID), the DC Office of Planning and other local agencies. The project will run from Sept. 28, 2018, through Sept. 20, 2020 along NY Ave at 13th Street, NW outside the NMWA building.
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