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Found 7 results

  1. Mt. Airy's Black Ankle Vineyards, one of Maryland’s best—and best known—wineries is owned and operated by a couple who live in the North Hills of Sligo Creek neighborhood of Silver Spring: https://www.sourceofthespring.com/business/one-marylands-top-wineries-owned-silver-spring-couple/
  2. Hello all. I guess I'm the newest member. My name is Jeff and I'm one of the owners and the Vigneron for Glen Manor Vineyards, a Virginia farm winery. I found this site after a friend forwarded to me a copy of the City Paper where Don recommended my Sauvignon Blanc...Thanks Don! I'll lurk for a little while but you will hear from me now and again. --- Edit - Readers, here are a whole bunch of links to Glen Manor threads, the most important being the first one where Jeff blogs for an entire year (Jan 1, 2010 - Dec 31, 2010) about the 2010 Virginia vintager. It should have won the James Beard Award for best writing on the internet, but somehow it didn't. Amazingly, there are no specific threads on Jeff's Sauvignon Blanc which is my favorite Glen Manor wine of them all. Happy reading! Don Rockwell The Virginia 2010 Vintage <--- This is the single best thread ever written on donrockwell.com 2007 Hodder Hill 2009 Hodder Hill 2010 Hodder Hill 2014 Virginia Governor's Cup Winners Glen Manor Tasting at Whole Foods (2010) Glen Manor Spring Barrel Tasting (2011) Glen Manor Winemaker Dinner (2011) Glen Manor Winemaker Dinner (2014) Glen Manor Vineyards (This Thread)
  3. I have been chauvinistic to Virginia wineries for a long time yet only recently have I found reds that I like (i.e. Hillsborough Onyx, Glen Manor Hodder Hill). I have not tried Chateau O'Brien's $80 tannat although we've been to the winery. RdV seems to be another level though. Rutger de Vink is something like Virginia's version of Washington state's passionate Charles Smith (Parker 99 points for several of his wines.) He has an absolutely incredible setting for his wine. This may be as impressive of a winery as I have been to anywhere; certainly sitting at the top of the steep hillside vineyard with its thirty plus mile view is breathtaking. I'm not so sure that anywhere in Greve or Panzano is more beautiful. The tasting room itself sits in front of an almost cathedral like silo that tops the caves underneath. This is a setting that could be worthy of a last taste ever. Forgive my hyperbole but the setting is indeed spectacular. This is also a totally unique winery in a number of ways: it is not easy to buy a bottle of wine. You have to either go to it or be on its mailing list. And it's not easy to get in. You cannot just walk in the door and ask for a taste. Tours and tastings are by appointment only and they are booked up on weekends into December. They also cost $40 per person (personal tour, tasting and reception). My guess is that you may not be able to find it either: there is no sign and it is on a scenic Virginia byway. The land wasn't purchased for Interstate convenience, rather for its rocky soil. The drive to RdV is also special. Out route 50 to Upperville and then a left to Delaplane through countryside that will confirm how beautiful this area is. There are rewards for planning the trip and the $40 is a real investment. Rutger de Vink spent an hour with us today; anyone who visits is escorted around the winery and the vineyards by either him or his winemaker. Rutger is truly an impassioned ambassador-and a believer-who has accepted the challenge of attempting to gain national (if not international) recognition for Virginia wine. For him it was not just a matter of building a winery in Santa Barbara or Napa. Rather he picked Virginia in large part for the rocks in the land underneath his vineyards. He also welcomed the opportunity to make a great Red...in Virginia. This is not easy. So far I believe only two restaurants serve his wine: The Inn at Little Washington and the Ashby Inn. He is going to find resistance. Virginia does not have the image of Napa or Bordeaux or even Walla Walla. It's a hard sell for a $30 wine let alone an $88 bottle of red. (RdV is his signature 85% cabernet based wine aged for two years in French oak. He also makes a $55 merlot blend, Rendezvous.) I'll save details about his winemaking or the consultants to others. I should note that he couriers samples weekly to France for tasting and confirmation. Certainly most important is what the wine is like. Is it worth $88 a bottle? Is this a wine that Mark Slater should feature at Ray's the Steaks or Vincent Ferraud at his tastings? Is this the red that would break through onto the menu at Trotter's or even, incredibly at San Francisco's Danko's? I didn't buy a bottle. I bought a case. I loved it. There may be a number of dinners that we'll postpone for this extravagance but we reasoned that we'll have twelve evenings to recapture the memory and the taste of today. His approach may be risky. Yet it might also be necessary to separate his wine and Virginia's image to take it to the next level. People are going to have to make an effort to taste this-they are going to have to want to try it. (Weekday appointments are available.) This is not a casual sip nor was it a casual effort to make it. It's a world class effort. In Delaplane. Virginia. _______________ Jancis Robinson on RdV with a video: http://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/a201109122.html Website: www.rdvvineyards.com
  4. I didn't see a thread on this winery so I thought I would add one. We visited this winery yesterday, and were pleasantly surprised by the quality of the wines. Hiddencroft was founded in 2008 by Clyde and Terry Housel. Terry is the winemaker and we enjoyed speaking with him about the process as we had our tasting. Like many of the smaller wineries in VA, Hiddencroft has a small tasting room and we were asked to wait just a few minutes when we arrived because their tasting room was full. They have a lovely deck and patio that provides a beautiful spot to picnic and enjoy bottles of their award winning wines. You are able to bring your own picnic, or you can purchase some grab-n-go picnic items from the tasting room. The wines were among the best we tasted yesterday (having made three other stops). I particularly like the Chambourcin Rose. Along with the rose, they were serving two other whites, three reds and two fruit wines during the tasting. They offered a plate of selected nibbles to accompany some of the wines, which was really a lovely little extra. I generally dislike fruit wines, but the pomegranate based wine was pretty good. Clyde explained that since pomegranates are really seeds, they contain tannins just like grapes. The wine avoids that cloying sweetness that is so common with fruit based wines. The warmth of the reception in the tasting room, combined with the quality of the wine, made for a really enjoyable visit and we all agreed we will return to the winery again.
  5. http://www.grandalefarm.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=111&Itemid=179 is their wine list which must feature 50 or more Loudoun wines by the bottle. My wife and I drove by, through and around this restaurant in a meadow, located a hundred or more yards off of a secondary Virginia rural biway several weeks ago. It was heartily recommended by the owner of nearby Hillsborough Vineyards. He happens to make a red wine, Bloodstone, that I trust. With an adjacent pond, surrounding pasture and a cow, horse and rooster or two this is an idyllic setting several miles west of Hillsboro. We vowed then to return. This Saturday night we will. With our recently reinforced stoked enthusiam for Northern Virginia wineries and their picturesque Tuscan like setting this working farm house, several miles off the beaten path, beckons. Twenty years ago we similarly discovered Four and Twenty Blackbirds. We hope that this will approach taking its place.
  6. Posting this for a friend... The Urban Winery is hiring! The Urban Winery is a boutique winery opening soon in Silver Spring crafting small batch vintages on-premises from the best growing regions in the US. The Urban Winery isn't just a commercial winery in an urban space though. It offers a tasting room and wine bar where guests can enjoy and learn about the wines and sample pairings of wine and food. Guests can also take wine classes and make their own wine under the direction of the winemaker. And the winery is available as an events space too. The Urban Winery is looking for people who are passionate about wine, the hospitality industry and customer service to join our team. We need: Sous Chef Servers Bar-backs If you're interested, send your resume and cover letter to Damon Callis, founder and winemaker at The Urban Winery: damon@theurbanwinery.com Full disclosure - While I have no direct financial interest in this business, my wife is working with Urban Winery on their branding.
  7. Wow - infanticide on the 2011 Littorai. I still have half my '06 R-C's, need to taste through them soon. Very interested to know what you thought of the K-B. My impression of older K-B's ('04) was that they were hot, alcoholic messes and not made to age - kind of like a Martinelli or Brewer Clifton "pinot". How was your experience?
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