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Found 7 results

  1. A chef I know wrote me a letter that was hilarious (on paper) but sad (in reality). In order to tide him over, he accepted a stable job at a country club. Here is the middle paragraph of his letter, reproduced with his permission (and without comment): "When they hired me, all I heard was, 'we want fine dining, fancy, unique ingredients.' Implemented it. It was as if I dropped my pants and took a shit on the 18th green in front of the Ladies Golf League. Now I'm serving meatloaf, liver and onions and a blue plate special." Sound familiar? Do any chefs who have been through this have any advice for this poor man? I don't know quite what he's going through, but close enough: I did once have a Monday-Friday job that I absolutely hated - so much so, that anxiety and dread started building up on Sunday morning, sometimes even Saturday night when I got home from being out. It is truly awful having a job that you despise, and I thank goodness that I actually look forward to working on this website every single morning that I wake up. (I will add that I was a whiz-kid, making my company look fantastic, but my supervisor stabbed me in the back and took *all* credit for it. He was a duplicitous MBA with fantastic political skills; I was a hard-charging MS in Computer Science who wanted to get the job done - I left after one year after giving senior management an ultimatum: 'Give me an early promotion, or I'm gone.' I've never looked back, and I never had any regrets - the next year I did similar work on my own and doubled my income. Unfortunately, chefs don't have that luxury. "Chasing your dreams" sounds like such a wonderful slogan, but sometimes it isn't possible, and you just have to bide your time - and man-oh-man is that a miserable period in ones life.
  2. To all those employers: The Professional Bartending School is an excellent source for employers. Our employment services are free to employers. I just noticed that Ridgewells/Purple Tie hired at least 15 graduates for the Holiday Season, plus additional events. We did a blast for them in mid August. I think they are pretty well staffed up now for the holidays. Our placement services do not charge for accessing our grads. We don't "do contracts" We do have a current data base of about 1300 graduates who are looking for employment, from parties and special events to part-time and full-time employment. We are expanding that. Employers of all sorts throughout the DC metro region (and beyond) use our services ranging from looking for part-time to full time bartenders. The grads range from new to some with over a decade of experience. They received a 40 hour hands on program, TAM alcohol management training, and customer service training. We don't claim they are the best bartenders in the world. We know that. But they are great for training. We are fulfilling a request now for an "artisan" bartender/manager who will uptrain a grad or two. Best way to contact us is through our job placement services: email at: pbsplacement@gmail.com or call for our job placement manager, Fatima at 703-841-9757. We also direct staff special events, catering, parties, etc. We can screen graduates for you. We can blast out emails to a large volume of grads. We will shortly be able to screen by geography. We are expanding the contact list as our total graduate list is well over 10,000 in the last decade, although we have no idea how many are currently or would be willing to bartend. Any questions or comments? I'll be happy to respond. Dave
  3. Hi. Like cooking Bison, Duck, and Tripe in a casual setting on H street? We work with small farmers, do things the right way, don't own a microwave, butcher a lot, change the menu a ton, etc. If you're down with this, shoot me your resume for a part time line cook gig. 3-4 days per week with 2 late night shifts. Pay based on experience. Brad chef@boundaryrd.com 081913dinner.pdf PS, our website is a work in progress. Attached is a current menu.
  4. I was pretty stunned by this. Its occurring right now. We were contacted by a pretty large, significant, name bar/restaurant for bartending staffing. In this example we are filtering leads and resumes for the establishment and will pass on leads to the operators/managers/ownership. We can perform more tasks or less tasks with regard to supplying candidates. We can filter for people with a lot of experience or less, contingent on your needs. In any event we reached out to both old/experienced grads and newer grads via direct email to our large base of graduates. Six minutes after the email went out we had 13 resumes for the 2 or 3 positions. That is a lot and that is fast. I scanned the contacts. Can't vouch for most of them but I know one is a very competent, efficient, effective, and friendly bartender and has done very well over the last few years. Really a stunning response. and for those professionals out there...we provide these placement services free to the employer. you can check my sig on the professional bartending school, contact me direct through, DR, or contact our placement manager, Fatima at pbsplacement@gmail.com (oh my...as I was leaving I saw that we had 47 grad responses to the opportunity). stunned me. that is a lot of responses.)
  5. A small H street bistro is looking for a sous chef to assist the head chef with butchery, ordering, menu planning, scheduling, etc. This is not a clip-board position; I'll need someone to work the line a few nights a week, and work a few day shifts managing prep. Regular week is 5 1/2 days (6, then 5). Roughly 55 hours a week. We work with the best purveyors in town and change our menu frequently. This is an ideal position for a solid line cook looking to advance. Please email me at chefgunshow@gmail.com if you are interested. Thanks.
  6. Have you always longed to be a cheesemonger? Do you even know what a cheesemonger is? 

Righteous Cheese is DC’s newest cheese shop, located in Union Market, and is seeking a full-time cheese lover, though we’ll consider part-timers if the candidate is the right fit. Us: An artisanal cheese shop and bar, offering unique, uncommon handmade cheeses made locally and around the world. Our cheese bar is a great spot to post up and enjoy one of our daily flights (cheese & wine/beer pairings). We always approach cheese with reverence but don’t take ourselves too seriously. You: excellent customer service, make customers laugh, love to learn, hardworking, never idle, very friendly and easy to get along with, loads of enthusiasm even under pressure, a great team player with a positive attitude, and most importantly - passionate about food…especially CHEESE! 

Experience in food, restaurants (back or front of house) retail, or cheese is a plus, but the passion and desire to learn is the most important attribute of a successful candidate. The job: You’ll learn the business of cheesemongering, how to pair cheese & wine/beer, and get loads of practical experience in both. The more experience & knowledge you already have, the better the pay. Weekend and evening hours are a must. The position is a hybrid of cheesemonger, server and garde manger – which means you’ll have plenty of different duties to keep you challenged, but will need to be flexible and adaptable. Do not apply if: you are only interested in working one day a week, or if you think this job will be easy. It will not. There will be times that you’ll be seriously annoyed with difficult customers, but you’ll have to maintain a sunny disposition. You will be required to learn a lot of information on cheese/wine/beer and know it backwards and forwards. There will be times that you’ll have to clean. There will be times that you are exhausted and ache from carrying huge wheels of cheese. But you’ll have a blast with our crew, and you’ll learn a lot about the world of cheese, wine and craft beer, as well as gain experience that is tough to get elsewhere. If this sounds absolutely amazing to you, please email info@righteouscheese.com with resume and cover letter explaining why you’d make the best cheesemonger around!
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