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Trotters


Anna Blume
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So, I bought some smoked ham hocks from my favorite pig person today.

Ran back when I noticed package said "Pig's feet, smoked..." only to be reassured by the farmer that the hocks just get processed by a guy whose labels mention only the feet that get thrown in w the hocks. Looks like I got two feet and only one hock instead of vice versa, with the latter destined for a pot of collard greens.

What should I do with the two smoked feet? I am not a great fan of aspic, though gelatinous cooled stock in the fridge suits me just fine.

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Well, snow means split pea soup, or snert (see topic on soup recipes), to me, so I asked for some FRESH, uncured hocks at Cedarbrook* this week. Have some cured ham in the freezer already to add as the other meat product.

Labeled pig's feet by Dave's processor, these nonetheless, are shy the cloven hooves: just large, sort of cowbell-shaped and encased in fat.

They've thawed overnight. I am wondering if I should free the meat from the fat first, or sear the pair before tossing them into the pot with the dried peas and vegetables.

Any advice from someone here who has cooked fresh feet before in a soup or stew?

*To whom will fermenteverything pass the torchon? :rolleyes:

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Well, snow means split pea soup, or snert (see topic on soup recipes), to me, so I asked for some FRESH, uncured hocks at Cedarbrook* this week. Have some cured ham in the freezer already to add as the other meat product.

Labeled pig's feet by Dave's processor, these nonetheless, are shy the cloven hooves: just large, sort of cowbell-shaped and encased in fat.

They've thawed overnight. I am wondering if I should free the meat from the fat first, or sear the pair before tossing them into the pot with the dried peas and vegetables.

Any advice from someone here who has cooked fresh feet before in a soup or stew?

*To whom will fermenteverything pass the torchon? :rolleyes:

We've trotted quite a bit over the years, though never in a soup. I'd brown them and throw them whole hog into the soup, with the idea that they can be fished out and stripped after they have an hour or two to flavor the legumes.

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