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Parsnips


edenman
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I used two parsnips in my chicken stock that just went on the stove, but WF was only selling them in bags of ~15, so I've got a bunch left. I'm thinking maybe they'd be useful in soup? Or maybe roasted and blended in a veg puree for a side? Any favorite recipes out there?

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I used two parsnips in my chicken stock that just went on the stove, but WF was only selling them in bags of ~15, so I've got a bunch left. I'm thinking maybe they'd be useful in soup? Or maybe roasted and blended in a veg puree for a side? Any favorite recipes out there?

I believe there's a traditional Christmas recipe involving a parsnip and a pear tree, but I don't have it with me right now.

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There was a recipe in the Thanksgiving issue of Gourmet for parsnip puree with brussel sprout leaves. I think of them as a cross between carrots and other root veg like turnip and rutabaga - you can do a lot with them. They're great just tossed with some other root veg in olive oil and some good herbs (thyme, rosemary, sage) and roasted in the oven.

Or I made a root veg puree for thanksgiving that would probably be good with parsnips too (I used about 1/2 and 1/2 rutabaga and turnips with a few potatoes thrown in). Infuse some heavy cream and butter with garlic, rosemary, thyme and sage and blend that into your mash, DELISH!

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They're good roasted. I like them along with roasted potatoes and carrots.

This is an excellent soup:

Spicy English Parsnip Soup. There are other parnsip ideas in that thread too.

If you're getting all roasty-rooty, flinging rutabaga (which turns a surprisingly cool color when cooked, despite looking like something developed in the old Soviet Union for a Five Year Plan), turnip and a little onion into the mix as well turns out a surprisingly attractive and tasty dish which sets especially well under anything braised. Perhaps Mrs. B will weigh in with her technique.

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If you're getting all roasty-rooty, flinging rutabaga (which turns a surprisingly cool color when cooked, despite looking like something developed in the old Soviet Union for a Five Year Plan), turnip and a little onion into the mix as well turns out a surprisingly attractive and tasty dish which sets especially well under anything braised. Perhaps Mrs. B will weigh in with her technique.
Getting far afield, I guess, but one thing I discovered a couple of months ago is that mashed turnips are excellent with horseradish cheddar mixed in. The horseradish and turnip work nicely together.

I'd use rutabaga more but I have a harder time chopping rutabaga than turnips. Of course, that's because my knives are embarrassing dull :)

This beef pot pie recipe uses turnips and carrots, but I'd imagine parsnips (spelled correctly this time :lol:), would be nice in it. I've been making this recipe for 15 years now. I try to make it at least once a year. I also find that the crust comes out great, and I usually have trouble with crusts.

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Make your braise/stew. Strain and reserve cooking liquid. Toss some chunks of parsnip, turnip and/or carrot in a saute pan for a quick brown. Throw in dutch oven with braised meat and reserved liquid and simmer for a while.

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This parsnip and carrot mash is really, really good, although I end up putting in more parsnip than it originally calls for now that I've made it a couple of times. I'd also second or third the recommendation for parsnip roasties - you really can't go wrong with root veg and large amounts of goose fat/duck fat/lard/etc.

I also ran across this parsnip gratin recipe a couple of weeks ago that sounds pretty tasty, although I haven't had a chance to try it yet.

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We eat a lot of parsnips. They're great roasted, really good braised with beef. Purees are awesome, alone or with other root vegetables. Or, if you're looking for a very quick side dish, slice them a half inch thick, microwave with a bit of water for two or three minutes until tender (preferably while a steak sizzles on the grill), finish in a pan with butter, salt and pepper, and whatever herbs you have on hand until nicely browned (while the steak rests).

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Parsnip chips are wonderful and a great snack, but there's a trick to them that was taught to me by an ex-I@LW chef.

Because of the high sugar content, they will turn brown quickly in a hot fryer--before they're properly crispy. Shave them on a mandoline and put them in a pot of room temp oil. Place the pot on high heat and let the chips fry as the temp is raised. They'll get plenty crispy and stay a nice, blonde color.

Fry some sage or rosemary in the oil afterwards and mortar & pestle it with coarse sea salt. Season the chips liberally.

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Because of the high sugar content, they will turn brown quickly in a hot fryer--before they're properly crispy. Shave them on a mandoline and put them in a pot of room temp oil. Place the pot on high heat and let the chips fry as the temp is raised. They'll get plenty crispy and stay a nice, blonde color.

Great tip! My one attempt at parsnip chips was delicious, but the texture was definitely lacking. I'll give this a try.

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I always add them to my mashed potatoes. They add a nice flavor as well as fewer carbs and some fiber and a lighter texture. They're really good that way. I probably do a 30/70 split in favor of the potato but you could probably go to 50-50. Just cut them slightly smaller than the potatoes so they cook at the same rate. Roasted with other rooties with sea salt and evoo also works quite nicely.

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Kinda made up a recipe last night based on what I had on hand:

Seared a pork loin in a cast iron pot. removed it from heat. Sauteed red onion, carrots, red peppers and parsnips in remaining fat. Deglazed with little red wine and fresh lime. Added the pork back to pot with vegetables...simmered with two cups of store-bought chicken stock for about 30 minutes. Seasoned at the end with more fresh lime, butter and cilantro.

Removed loin. Rested it for a few minutes. Diced it and threw it back in the stew.

Served pork stew over white rice. Perfect.

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Because of the high sugar content, they will turn brown quickly in a hot fryer--before they're properly crispy. Shave them on a mandoline and put them in a pot of room temp oil. Place the pot on high heat and let the chips fry as the temp is raised. They'll get plenty crispy and stay a nice, blonde color.

This didn't work for me. They did, finally, get reasonably crispy, but I had to fry them until they were quite brown. Part of the problem, I think, is that this technique doesn't work for multiple batches, so I had to overcrowd the pot to get more than a single serving. I think next week I'll try double frying them.

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I've seen small, dry, nearly useless parsnips several places. But last week, at Harris Teeter, I picked up several large, fresh, firm, absolutely gorgeous parsnips. They're out there.
I've gotten some great, huge parsnips this year from weekend vendors outside Eastern Market.
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This must be the Year of the Parsnip - I'm having a hell of a time finding them at the moment. I got the last 3 the Dulles Wegmans had, and while Whole Foods does have them, theirs are tiny and thoroughly unsuitable for roasting.
I just saw a large basket of them at one of the farms at the Dupont Sunday Farmer's Market last Sunday.
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I just saw a large basket of them at one of the farms at the Dupont Sunday Farmer's Market last Sunday.
That would be Sunnyside Farm, their truck being first on the southern end of 20th Street, next to the cones and poles that block off the street and across from Dolcezza (gelato). Really good, I might add.

I used to buy mine from Trader Joe's since they have the best grocery-store price around.

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