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Arugula


JLK
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I like the baby arugula served in restaurants way better than the "baby" arugula found in bags at Whole Foods and other grocery stores. Smaller, paler leaves. Slightly less assertive flavor. Anyone know where I can find the good stuff?

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I don't know what her current growing or selling schedule is, but Cinda at Gardener's Gourmet has good baby arugula. She may be at Dupont market on Sundays through the winter. She's at Eastern Market on Saturdays, but not during the winter months. I seem to recall the Dupont hours carry over in the winter, though.

ETA: The Dupont Market thread says that she's not there for the winter months.

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Check out the Farm at Sunnyside stand at Dupont. I know they are growing some in the tunnels but I don't know if it is ready for market yet.
It is.

However, market shoppers, heed: slim pickins in the winter time on a sunny day w temperatures above freezing. Don't know about the other markets that operate all year round, but at Dupont Circle most green produce was gone by 11:00, two hours after opening. Go early.

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If you can wait for it to open, the vendor on the left at the end of the parking lot at the Annandale Farmer's Market (Thursday mornings) has arugula that is really good. I have a friend that makes the trip every week that it is in season just to buy arugula.

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Here's the dilemma: I have a big bag of end-of-season arugula, so much that the contents filled an entire salad spinner (if I weren't so cranky about trends in the misuse of words, I'd add "literally"). They're tiny, roundish leaves which seem watery and insipid. I also have about that much of a superior salad mix that I'd prefer to use as salads. Both were brought home Saturday and while I can share, that's still a whole lot of salad greens.

Any ideas about what to do with the arugula that haven't occurred to me?

All I can think of that I've done before: a) sauté w garlic in olive oil for pasta. This stuff strikes me as too watery and bland for that treatment. 2 because "b" turns into a "cool" smiley face) Potato-arugula soup. Also don't think the leaves are going to respond well for similar reasons.

Anyone try treating arugula as if it were spinach or some other sort of green that could be cooked first, chopped, and then sautéed/fried forever w onions until dry, then used in rice or to coat potatoes (as in Indian or Persian cooking) or even to stuff pockets of dough?

Edited by leleboo
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Anyone try treating arugula as if it were spinach or some other sort of green that could be cooked first, chopped, and then sautéed/fried forever w onions until dry, then used in rice or to coat potatoes (as in Indian or Persian cooking) or even to stuff pockets of dough?

Yes, in a take on spanikopita. It cooked much faster than spinach, even faster than baby spinach, and blended well with parmesan (but that's not really a surprise :) ).

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I usually pick off the leave for salad but don't like throwing the stems away so one day I threw them in some ramen broth, figured if it was tough I could throw it out but would still have the nutrients in the broth. It was delicious, crisp, more like watercress than spinach.

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