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Saveur Magazine (1994-2021) - A New York Gourmet Magazine Purchased by Bonnier Corporation in 2010 - Discontinued


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Does anyone else subscribe to/purchase Saveur magazine?
What do you think of the redesign that has happened in the latest issue? I just got it yesterday so haven't thoroughly looked it over, but my first reaction was blechhh!

I love that magazine partly because of the (old) design. I love the articles and the pictures and the little sidebars and the extra info in the back about techniques or where to buy ingredients, etc. I always feel like I've been somewhere after I finish reading one of their stories, like the one in the March issue about the old family home in very Southern Switzerland near the Italian border, with that recipe that paired a fried egg with fresh asparagus....mmmmm!

Seems to me like they messed with a good thing and the change wasn't an improvement, at least visually. I don't think the quality of the content has changed, but it just might not be as fun to read mad.gif .

What other publications do DR'ers like to check out? (Food related, of course!)

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I also get Saveur and had the same reaction...not too crazy about the redesign. I thought the old cover made the magazine stand out, now it looks like any other run of the mill food magazine. Haven't had a chance to read the stories yet. It is by far my favorite cooking/food magazine and the only one I subscribe to.

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I let me subscription lapse, so I am interested to see what the change is. I find that the first thing I do when I step into a bookstore is head right for the magazine section to see what new cooking magazines are available. I always pick-up the newest Cuccina Italia, Intermezzo, Food Arts, Pastry, and Chocolatier. I guess I should really subscribe to them. While not really a magazine, but still a periodical I really like Art Culinaire.

The latest Intermezzo did something that I have never seen in a cooking/food magazine before, and it was quite annoying. On the cover they show a scallop dish that looked very intriguing, however, there was not a recipe for it, or even a description of what the dish was, or where it was from. I hope this is not a trend for them.

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I think we disgruntled Saveur readers/subscribers should write in and express our discontent. The editor's note about the redesign made it sound like they were doing us a big favor - uh, don't think so and they certainly haven't done themselves any favors.

I agree with all of your comments - it does make the magazine look just like all the rest of them, they've lost the look that made them stand out, and from what I saw (quick look before heading out for Eve last nite) the readability of the magazine has dropped dramatically. It doesn't look like a magazine that I want to keep all the backcopies of anymore. Boo!

I used to get Food & Wine and Gourmet, but don't anymore, except when my mom brings me her leftovers.

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The new Saveur has a recipe for Vegetarian Haggis.  WTF is that?  What is haggis without innards?  And what do you stuff it in, if it is vegetarian.  The worst part about this travesty is that it is served in Scotland!

Saw that and thought "how very odd!"

OK, so the new format is growing on me, or I'm getting used to (or ignoring) it. The biggest and most offensive difference is the cover - which is a pretty big deal...

I guess I just don't like change - bring back the Dreamery :lol:

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The Saveur Top 100 list for the year includes the notion of handwashing the dinner dishes.

I have to say this idea startled me.

Previous to this the only person I knew who had a thing for hand washing the dishes was the famous Washingtonian Sir Charles, who wrote a touching and marvellous essay-ic loveletter about the act.

Am I missing something? Am I out of the loop further than I even knew? Do people really love to wash their dishes by hand? Is this going to be the new thing? Or was this some odd synchronicity that occurred with the Love Letter to Handwashing by Sir Charles and Saveur magazine? And if this is going to be the new thing can someone come to my house and do it for me please?

Thank you in advance for your advice and instruction.

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The Saveur Top 100 list for the year includes the notion of handwashing the dinner dishes.

I have to say this idea startled me.

Perhaps it's connected to the current fashion for things being kept simple and done the way they used to be, merged to some extent with concern about being environmentally friendly. (I have no idea, though, if handwashing dishes is "greener" than using a dishwasher. How much electricity is used to heat the water to wash dishes individually vs. what is used in a dishwasher? How much water is used in the two methods? I'm not terribly efficient at handwashing dishes and probably waste more water washing a dozen items than the dishwasher uses for a full load.)

There are a few things we handwash but not very many.

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I picked up Saveur yesterday. (Unusual - I don't often buy food mags but rather go to the book section.) It is very nice - gold and shiny cover and all that. :blink:

I was curious about the dishes thing and also wanted to take a look at the magazine as I haven't seen one for about half a year.

So far it's rather nice, to my mind. Nothing too weighty or strained, nothing too flimsy or flaky. :(

What struck me was how very different my perception is of the list of "100", when I see it accompanied by really well-done photos.

The handwashing of dishes is at number 36. The title of the blurb is "A Noble Chore". It's written by David Sax, who is a journalist with his own website besides the "Save the Deli" website which he started and runs, which is an excellent resource for all things Authentically Deli.

His take on the dishwashing task is that it is a zen-like exercise.

I think reading magazines about people who like to wash dishes is more of a zen-like exercise, myself. :(

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Waitman, voulez vous wash les plates avec moi, cest soir?

Washing by hand has its benefits when done as a pas de deux but on a daily basis I think I prefer the dishwasher. The one stuck in the wall connected to the sink. Oh bloody hell, you know what I mean.

Don't you?

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Washing by hand has its benefits when done as a pas de deux but on a daily basis I think I prefer the dishwasher. The one stuck in the wall connected to the sink. Oh bloody hell, you know what I mean.

Don't you?

The one stuck in the wall connected to the sink is easier to deal with on a day to day basis than any one that walks around not stuck in the wall connected to the sink, in my opinion. :blink:

Plus less laundry to do and nobody trying to steal the quilt in the middle of the night, either. :(

The only disadvantage is when one needs to have repairs done to the one stuck in the wall connected to the sink. Then you have to call a handy-man in to fix it and the last one I called tried to barter a "hug" for his services.

I assessed the situation and decided he just wasn't cute enough. :(

Meh.

I still feel that Sir Charles wrote the original essay and defined the reality of the original idea. All others who follow are merely following upon the steps of the Ur-Handwashing Essay.

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The one stuck in the wall connected to the sink is easier to deal with on a day to day basis than any one that walks around not stuck in the wall connected to the sink, in my opinion. :blink:

Plus less laundry to do and nobody trying to steal the quilt in the middle of the night, either. :(

The only disadvantage is when one needs to have repairs done to the one stuck in the wall connected to the sink. Then you have to call a handy-man in to fix it and the last one I called tried to barter a "hug" for his services.

I assessed the situation and decided he just wasn't cute enough. :(

Meh.

I still feel that Sir Charles wrote the original essay and defined the reality of the original idea. All others who follow are merely following upon the steps of the Ur-Handwashing Essay.

In this case, the one not stuck to the wall is also the one who does the laundry. And, on occasion, fixes the one stuck to the wall

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In this case, the one not stuck to the wall is also the one who does the laundry. And, on occasion, fixes the one stuck to the wall

Ones not stuck to the wall who do laundry are much more valuable than ones who do not. Ones not stuck to the wall who can fix things even moreso. That last sentence I wrote is perhaps a somewhat sexist statement. The best sort of ones not stuck to the wall are those who are basically honest - those who do not lie, cheat or steal. I had one not stuck to the wall who did, to my very great surprise after ten years or so as the presentation was exactly and intensively the opposite. Those not stuck to the wall who write semi-public love letters to the muse who may possibly also be their wife are probably valuable in ways not known to any flies around who may be stuck to the wall.

...................................

Saveur also has an article this month on egg rolls by Steven Shaw.

I'll see what else is interesting in the issue after I pry myself off the wall and read a bit more. That, of course, will be after I feed the munchkins and uh . . . load the dishwasher. The one stuck to the wall. :(

Maybe I can put some laundry in it too. :(

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Those not stuck to the wall who write semi-public love letters to the muse who may possibly also be their wife are probably valuable in ways not known to any flies around who may be stuck to the wall.
Indeed.

Second, these flies, they must unstick and do the laundry. And of course the dishes, first.

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I'm not sure what it is I've stepped into by starting a discussion of an article in Saveur that seemed very similar to an essay posted somewhere else.

I'm really really not sure as I do not know either Waitman well nor Mrs. B at all, though I've read very nice things about her in posts.

At this point I can't even try to figure it out, and I wish that I hadn't responded at first to a post I did not clearly understand.

My apologies if answering the post addressed to me was not what was wanted, or if I answered it wrong somehow.

Bowing out,

Karen

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Back on topic...#86-89, great American sandwiches. The Reuben, chicken salad, and Muffeletta all belong on the list. But the "Boston Baked Bean" sandwich? My mother's family has been in and around Boston since the 1680s. I've never heard of such a thing. None of my five editions of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook (The Boston Cooking School) mention a baked bean sandwich. There's a Wikipedia entry that mentions one source. Where did this come from?

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Back on topic...#86-89, great American sandwiches. The Reuben, chicken salad, and Muffeletta all belong on the list. But the "Boston Baked Bean" sandwich? My mother's family has been in and around Boston since the 1680s. I've never heard of such a thing. None of my five editions of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook (The Boston Cooking School) mention a baked bean sandwich. There's a Wikipedia entry that mentions one source. Where did this come from?
If it's termed "Boston Baked Bean," that may mean it's not from Boston. It sounds similar to British baked beans on toast to me, except I usually think of that as open-faced.

Google brings up numerous recipes (searched without the "Boston").

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It sounds similar to British baked beans on toast to me, except I usually think of that as open-faced.
The spouse has a concoction he calls "eggs Boston," which is basically beans on toast with a fried egg, but I'm pretty sure that a) it's not a sandwich per se since you can't pick it up, and b] that Saveur wouldn't be aware of it even if it were. :(
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How has another year gone by since the last Saveur 100? Somehow it did.

I still do not believe in the soul-enhancing qualities of hand-washing the dishes, but still very much like to see the idea when written as an essay full of charm rather than as a sound-byte on a page as a recommendation for a way to bring joy to life through things gastronomic and clean.

It looks to me as if the format of the 100 has changed slightly, but I'm not certain about that - and I did not save last year's issue to double-check.

I didn't run out to eat or buy anything based on last year's list. I might this year - the mention of some of the books I've thought of buying before might edge me towards clicking that special button on Amazon to buy them.

One friend told me this 100 bored her, and wondered if it is her or if it is the list itself . . .

(And at foodvox Moira Tuscanaro did a food zodiac write-up of it all, if you are prone to being interested in that sort of thing.)

I'm curious as to what people think about the list this year. Did you find it delightful?

Or - like my friend - deadly dull . . . .

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It looks to me as if the format of the 100 has changed slightly, but I'm not certain about that - and I did not save last year's issue to double-check.

One friend told me this 100 bored her, and wondered if it is her or if it is the list itself . . .

I'm curious as to what people think about the list this year. Did you find it delightful?

Or - like my friend - deadly dull . . . .

I think the format has changed from last (and previous) year's lists. I'm not quite through reading the issue, but I didn't find it as fun or interesting to read as I have in the past. I appreciate the focus on things like cookbooks, home cooks, one-pot meals, etc. but I really enjoyed the little secrets or hidden gems that have been sprinkled throughout past lists. To me, it seemed like the entries were more general and not as focused or specific as they used to be. I didn't feel the need to read it from beginning to end in one sitting, so I guess it didn't delight me all that much.

I do agree about the cookbooks - I will be checking some of them out in more detail (especially from Amaranth to Zucchini).

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The Saveur 100 is the worst issue of the year, and this year was no exception...five types of salt, six types of oil... :P

That said I might try and make the various condiment recipes they have sprinkled throughout. and the red snapper and veggie lasagna recipes...so maybe it won't be a complete waste.

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I would guess that making the number so high is useful for the idea of attracting potential advertisers - ad revenue supports most traditional print media, after all.

Something really does click with the number '100' with a lot of people, though. A sort of magical number. '100 Places to See Before You Die' (I always get a little nervous, myself, reading that book title . . .) etc.

The meme of '100 things one should eat' that was going around the blogosphere several months ago was tremendously popular. It felt like bloggers were almost tripping over themselves trying to get their lists posted quickly. :P

Well. After all, there are only so many moments left in life to spend eating.

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I usually enjoy the annual "100" issue.  There are always one or two interesting things that I go out and try, or buy.  This year's is no exception, but I'm finding the navel gazing self references to past issues (presumably because this is the 20th anniversary edition) really annoying.

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Anyone looking for a particular back issue of Saveur, or interested in a random 'collection'? I have issues from as far back as 2001 (WTH was I thinking?!?) and they are going in the recycling tonight.

They aren't consecutive, and many months are missing - looks like some 2001 and 2002, all of 2003, 2004, and a mix from 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. I got better about reading and discarding after that, I guess  :rolleyes:

PM me if you're interested in one/some/all of them. I can bring them to the picnic, or make other arrangements to hand them off in the near future.

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Anyone looking for a particular back issue of Saveur, or interested in a random 'collection'? I have issues from as far back as 2001 (WTH was I thinking?!?) and they are going in the recycling tonight.

They aren't consecutive, and many months are missing - looks like some 2001 and 2002, all of 2003, 2004, and a mix from 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. I got better about reading and discarding after that, I guess  :rolleyes:

PM me if you're interested in one/some/all of them. I can bring them to the picnic, or make other arrangements to hand them off in the near future.

This sounds like me when I couldn't *give away* my CD's - they ended up going to Salvation Army ... I'd paid over $1,000 for them.

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Saveur as a print magazine has folded.  I received a postcard today saying my Saveur magazine subscription would be transfered to Magnolia Journal, part of the Magnolia brand run by Joanna and Chip Gaines of some fixer upper type TV show.  They are launching a new TV network also called Magnolia.  

Saveur is pivoting with a renewed focus on their digital platforms (which frankly suck, their website is awful).  

During its prime Saveur was one of the top cooking magazine (the top imo).  I'd been a constant subscriber since 1997.  Sigh. 

NY Post with the details.   

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1 hour ago, Tweaked said:

Saveur as a print magazine has folded.  I received a postcard today saying my Saveur magazine subscription would be transfered to Magnolia Journal, part of the Magnolia brand run by Joanna and Chip Gaines of some fixer upper type TV show.  They are launching a new TV network also called Magnolia.  

Saveur is pivoting with a renewed focus on their digital platforms (which frankly suck, their website is awful).  

During its prime Saveur was one of the top cooking magazine (the top imo).  I'd been a constant subscriber since 1997.  Sigh. 

NY Post with the details.   

I just saw this a little earlier today and felt very sad. I have a lot of the old magazines, though some of them got damaged when our boiler malfunctioned this winter and flooded the basement. Sigh. I don't look at their website that often but can't say it's impressed me. I miss magazines, the way I miss so many other things it would never have occurred to me I'd have occasion to miss.

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Pat, I can totally relate. We moved to North Carolina 4 years ago and I really miss having the Washington Post delivered to my front door every morning. I used to complain about it and everyone from my husband to my grown children, to my friends reminded me that I could read it online. Of course I read it online, just like I read the NYT online. It’s not the same. 

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Saveur was the first 'cooking' magazine that I purchased. Even though it was a pretty skinny periodical compared to the magazines of the day when it was first published, it had such a unique style. When I recall the 1990s as a decade, I would still read The Washington Post and NY Times Sunday editions and magazines like Saveur. 

Saveur was a sophisticated but accessible culinary tourist experience before all of the cooking travel shows became popular. 

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On 2/18/2021 at 4:40 PM, Tweaked said:

Saveur as a print magazine has folded.  I received a postcard today saying my Saveur magazine subscription would be transfered to Magnolia Journal, part of the Magnolia brand run by Joanna and Chip Gaines of some fixer upper type TV show.  They are launching a new TV network also called Magnolia.  

Oof. That's a rough switch.

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22 hours ago, lizzie said:

I  follow them on Instagram but loved the magazine. I recently went through all my cooking magazine 'archives' and purged very many. I may now regret that.

(and, hi Pat!)

Purging because you want to is probably preferable to sand getting in through the water line and blowing out valves on the boiler during the winter and flooding the basement as a strategy🙃. (I made excuses for keeping magazines I couldn't part with but they're not exactly in anything resembling mint condition now.)

(Hi there, Lizzie!)

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