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Veal Tongue


ScotteeM
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When I was a kid (late 50's, early 60's) we would have tongue for dinner with enough frequency for me to remember it. I don't know if it was beef or veal, and I remember it was "boiled," but don't know any more than that. I think my maternal grandmother (of Irish and Scottish immigrant descent) was the one who prepared it, or taught my mom to.

Last week when I was visiting Mom (now in her 80s, with terminal cancer), she was reminiscing about the dish, and how much she loved that, as well as smoked tongue. So I ordered a veal tongue from my Amish farmer and I'm going to try to make it for Mom. It looks like I should braise or simmer it slowly for a couple of hours, but with what seasonings?

Any help at all would be appreciated. I want to keep it simple, and it sounds like I'll have to puree the end product for her, but what the heck--I can try.

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When I was a kid (late 50's, early 60's) we would have tongue for dinner with enough frequency for me to remember it. I don't know if it was beef or veal, and I remember it was "boiled," but don't know any more than that. I think my maternal grandmother (of Irish and Scottish immigrant descent) was the one who prepared it, or taught my mom to.

Last week when I was visiting Mom (now in her 80s, with terminal cancer), she was reminiscing about the dish, and how much she loved that, as well as smoked tongue. So I ordered a veal tongue from my Amish farmer and I'm going to try to make it for Mom. It looks like I should braise or simmer it slowly for a couple of hours, but with what seasonings?

Any help at all would be appreciated. I want to keep it simple, and it sounds like I'll have to puree the end product for her, but what the heck--I can try.

You can't go wrong with aromatics -- onion, garlic, carrot, celery top, parsley, thyme, bay leaf, black peppercorns, whole allspice berries or a couple of cloves. And salt. Cook low and slow "two to three hours or until tender"*. When cool enough to handle, peel off the outer layer of skin and remove "the roots, small bones and gristle"*.

*Joy of Cooking ©1964

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remove "the roots, small bones and gristle"*.

*Joy of Cooking ©1964

I've never prepared a tongue, although a good smoked-tongue sandwich with plenty of strong mustard is a wonderful thing. Do veal tongues really have bones in them? I'm pretty sure the tongue I've been carrying around in my mouth all these years is boneless.
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I've never prepared a tongue, although a good smoked-tongue sandwich with plenty of strong mustard is a wonderful thing. Do veal tongues really have bones in them? I'm pretty sure the tongue I've been carrying around in my mouth all these years is boneless.
When I've cooked veal tongue, it has been boneless but with cartilage that night be confused with bones. I just simmer the tongues in a little broth until tender (ie a knife enters easily). I think water with aromatics as suggested would be fine. Peeling the tongue while hot makes getting the skin off easier but it can also be done after the tongue is cool. In the latter case a little knife work makes getting the skin off easier.

If you are going to slice it for a sandwich, be sure to use a tongue that has been corned first. I don't know if I would suggest smiking a home cooked tongue.

If you use a fresh tongue, a salsa verde will be a good idea to accompany, or a good herbed mayo with strong mustard. Slice the tongue in 3/8" to 1/2 " or so thick slices, warm in some of the cooking broth and serve with the sauce of choice on the side.

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