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Salsa Verde


Anna Blume
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Not a biggie, but I made a fresh salsa verde to go w dinner tonight and I'm currently blackening the remaining tomatillo halves to make a "roasted" version.

Okay to just throw the cooled tomatilloes into a glass jar and make the sauce tomorrow or the night after that? What will have more flavor? Thanks.

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Not a biggie, but I made a fresh salsa verde to go w dinner tonight and I'm currently blackening the remaining tomatillo halves to make a "roasted" version.

Okay to just throw the cooled tomatilloes into a glass jar and make the sauce tomorrow or the night after that? What will have more flavor? Thanks.

Make your second salsa tomorrow or Friday. Assuming lime juice and/or salt is involved, mixing everything together now would breakdown the vegetables and draw out water.

Kudos for blackening, what a flavor booster.

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Not a biggie, but I made a fresh salsa verde to go w dinner tonight and I'm currently blackening the remaining tomatillo halves to make a "roasted" version.

Okay to just throw the cooled tomatilloes into a glass jar and make the sauce tomorrow or the night after that? What will have more flavor? Thanks.

When I make salsa verde to use as enchilada sauce, I usually stew the tomatillos, garlic and onion in chicken broth and then puree them with a roasted, peeled poblano and some cilantro. Salsa verde for table salsa or mole verde, I roast the tomatillos, onions, garlic and chiles first. I rarely make raw salsa (salsa cruda) with tomatillos, though I do often put a raw tomatillo into guacamole when I am making a lot of it--it adds volume and tartness without making it too loose, which a large amount of lime juice might do. There isn't a problem with roasting your veg and making the salsa the next day, but I'd suggest that you make your roasted tomatillo salsa with roasted onion, garlic and chile, rather than just using roasted tomatillos with raw onion. Cooked salsas have an entirely different character than raw ones, and have much greater, subtler depth of flavor, IMO.
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You may not recall that I once stood in your kitchen and learned how to make your delicious cooked salsa verde. :rolleyes: Quail guy also has numerous versions, raw and cooked and mixtures thereof that I like. But after some wonderful squash blossom tacos that Chef Raffa made with a bright, simple, very fresh-tasting sauce, I'd been hankering for something similar, in this case to mix into arroz blanco instead of spooning on top of anything. The cast-iron skillet method for blackening the tomatillos that I used tonight came from one of the Bayless books.

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