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Soy Grits


Dave Pressley
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Tried these for the first time tonight as I was feeling like trying something new. I bought "soy grits" at Harris Teeter. These are soybeans that are dried, toasted and coarse-ground--meant to be cooked like regular grits. I really haven't found too many soy-based products that I don't like, so how bad could these be, right?

I brought milk, water, a bit of garlic, shallots, rosemary, black pepper and thyme to a quick boil, added the "grits" and let them simmer, covered, for about 15-20 minutes. I let them rest for another 10 minutes off the heat.

I tasted them. The flavors were spot-on (pat on the back) but the damn things felt like wet sand on the palate. Just the most unpleasing texture ever...really.

Anyone have a decent use for them? I want to like them, but I just can't in their suggested application. (I may use them to bind a meatloaf or crabcake, but I'm not considering them for anything more than a binder right now. In fact, I am probably going to use the rest of the bag outside my front door after the next snow, to get some traction.)

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I could be entirely off-base, but is it possible they need to cook longer to absorb more liquid and develop a better texture? Since soy is a legume, it won't necessarily have the properties of a grain even after drying and toasting to give it a more grain-like appearance.

Many of the brands that pop up via a quick Google search note that one might add the soy grits to other grain products "for texture" (if not using them for gluten-free and/or low-carb purposes), so it may be a losing battle.

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Tried these for the first time tonight as I was feeling like trying something new. I bought "soy grits" at Harris Teeter. These are soybeans that are dried, toasted and coarse-ground--meant to be cooked like regular grits. I really haven't found too many soy-based products that I don't like, so how bad could these be, right?

I brought milk, water, a bit of garlic, shallots, rosemary, black pepper and thyme to a quick boil, added the "grits" and let them simmer, covered, for about 15-20 minutes. I let them rest for another 10 minutes off the heat.

I tasted them. The flavors were spot-on (pat on the back) but the damn things felt like wet sand on the palate. Just the most unpleasing texture ever...really.

Anyone have a decent use for them? I want to like them, but I just can't in their suggested application. (I may use them to bind a meatloaf or crabcake, but I'm not considering them for anything more than a binder right now. In fact, I am probably going to use the rest of the bag outside my front door after the next snow, to get some traction.)

Maybe, if you are willing to take a risk on another batch, try fine-grinding them first.
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After a lot of online research (and some common sense which I should have used in the first place), it seems as if these buggers just don't soak up liquid like they are advertised. I will use them as a binder in a pinch, but never, ever will I try to use them as the starch component of a dish again.

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