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Mama Ayesha's, Middle Eastern by the Ellington Bridge on Calvert Street in Adams Morgan


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I also live nearby and also rarely go. Tried once on a Friday night and it was packed, so someone's definitely going.

The chicken with sumac onions is insanely good. Actually, all the roast meat dishes we had there were tasty. Lamb got raves. Plain food best washed down with plentiful, cheap wine.

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i used to go much more frequently but alas my free time is so limited these days. like jm chen, i have very fond recollections of all of the meats at mama ayesha's. but what i remember most is the service. extremely gracious staff there who seem possesed with a genuine concern for the experience of every guest.

and that patio is a great place to people watch in the middle of the evening as all of the adams morgan revelers stride down the path to drunken merriment.

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Somewhat off-topic, but right near Mama Ayesha's is a plaque on the Duke Ellington bridge that has his real first/middle names:  Edward Kennedy!

Also, that "ugliest building in the world" right by the bridge?  Bathroom for Metrobus drivers.

Are you talking about the little building at the bus turn-around? Used to be the turn-around for the trollies which plied the bridge. It's historic and is staying. Ugly is as ugly does.

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I've only been to Mama Ayesha's once, for a friend's large birthday group. There must have been 20 of us and they treated us great [somehow]. I remember enjoying it enough and it wasn't pricey, but I haven't returned for whatever reason. Part of it must be that I am not part of the crowd that thinks that Lebanese Taverna's quality has dropped.

Edited by JLK
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Are you talking about the little building at the bus turn-around?  Used to be the turn-around for the trollies which plied the bridge.  It's historic and is staying.  Ugly is as ugly does.

Got news for ya Barbara: "turn-arounds" don't have buildings attached to them.

That isn't a turn-around; that's a bathroom.

And what on earth is that hideous pipe running along the south sidewalk?

Cheers!

Rocks

[Edit: okay so it is a turn-around (scroll down to the fourth paragraph). But I know it's a bathroom because one day I approached a pulled-over Metrobus, folded-over at the waist because I had to tinkle so badly, and basically begged the driver to let me go in. He politely refused, explaining to me it was a facility for employees only. Desperate and forlorn, I found myself underneath the Ellington bridge within minutes.]

Edited by DonRocks
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Got news for ya Barbara:  "turn-arounds" don't have buildings attached to them.

That isn't a turn-around; that's a bathroom. 

And what on earth is that hideous pipe running along the south sidewalk?

Cheers!

Rocks

[Edit:  okay so it is a turn-around (scroll down to the fourth paragraph).  But I know it's a bathroom because one day I approached a pulled-over Metrobus, folded-over at the waist because I had to tinkle so badly, and basically begged the driver to let me go in.  He politely refused, explaining to me it was a facility for employees only.  Desperate and forlorn, I found myself underneath the Ellington bridge within minutes.]

there used to be a similar bus driver facility at friendship heights now buried under a highrise that is a far uglier building than anything by the bridge. it was a hangout for winos and had a uniquely rank odor from the many things they were spilling in there. i could stand it for about five minutes for warmth if it was cold enough outside and there was a long wait for the next bus.

as for mama's, that restaurant was in its prime about 30 years ago, before the renovation, in the days when ted kennedy was a hothead you really didn't want to run into. bacchus marked a more sophisticated departure from the restaurant's home cooking. the food is still decent, i guess, and fairly inexpensive, but the last few times we were there vegetables were being way overcooked. it's always been pretty much meat that's the star, but the vine leaves and cabbage dishes were better before as well. they used to boast about what they hauled in from their garden in virginia, don't know if that is happening anymore. the whole place goes down fairly smoothly, however, with arak, and turkish coffee provides a jolt. i've always been lukewarm about bird nests. their version was pretty fine in its heyday.

in the old days, mama used to jabber incessantly on the telephone in the back in what must have been lebanese, lending further authenticity to meals. one time we saw a boisterous denizen of the bar escorted from the premises by two or three waiters. they returned about five minutes later with big smiles on their faces. they had pasted him, we guessed.

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And what on earth is that hideous pipe running along the south sidewalk?

I really hope that it's not permanent, but it's been there for about a year. It really mars one of the finest bridges in the city.

And back to the streetcar turn-arounds: There's another one on the west side of Connecticut Avenue, just south of Chevy Chase Circle.

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... I know it's a bathroom because one day I approached a pulled-over Metrobus, folded-over at the waist because I had to tinkle so badly, and basically begged the driver to let me go in.  He politely refused, explaining to me it was a facility for employees only.  Desperate and forlorn, I found myself underneath the Ellington bridge within minutes.]

Don Rockwell has to be admired for participating in the traditional Adams-Morgan

night of drinking in every detail.

I can imagine the man in blue stopping by ... "OK, buddy, I got you in flagrante delicto.

Gotta give you a ticket ... If I check the D.C. Code ... yes here it is ... 'discharge

into a public waterway without a permit'."

The little building is historic ... did you notice Arts and Crafts details? Designed by

famous architect Waddy Woods. You could look it up.

I don't think the little building had a name ... until now. The possibilities...

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It was a bus-loop as far back as the late 70's. My DH (former Metropolitan PD) who patrolled this area, was asked to stay (off-duty) b/c of the break-ins they'd been having. After eating a TRAY of baklava :lol: , he caught burglers breaking in thru the roof. One of his all-time easiest, and most pleasant, arrests!

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Finally got around to stopping by here (I now live nearby) last night with txaggie. I figured the place was going to be something of a dive inside, but it's surprisingly nice. The food was good in a home-y, comforting way. We had some nicely roasted garlic chicken and kibbeh (a ground lamb and bulgur dish). I think each entree was only $11, so it's a good value. The service was very friendly (though the waiters were even friendlier to the two attractive young women that were sitting next to us).

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Finally got around to stopping by here (I now live nearby) last night with txaggie.  I figured the place was going to be something of a dive inside, but it's surprisingly nice.  The food was good in a home-y, comforting way.  We had some nicely roasted garlic chicken and kibbeh (a ground lamb and bulgur dish).  I think each entree was only $11, so it's a good value.  The service was very friendly (though the waiters were even friendlier to the two attractive young women that were sitting next to us).

Homey is a great way to describe a lot of the dishes at Mama Ayesha's, especially the squash stuffed with rice and ground lamb in a tomato sauce. Every time I go there, I say I'll try something different but I always come back to this dish....it's so comforting. :lol:

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Too bad it's in a terrible location.

I don't think it's in a terrible location. In fact, it's in a rather fine location, within walking distance of some of the most densely populated residential areas in the city, and also an easy walk from Woodley Park Metro and the Woodley Park megahotels. One indicator that the location isn't terrible is that the place has been in operation for decades, formerly as the Calvert Cafe (which was often referred to as Mama Ayesha's). They changed the name formally after Mama Ayesha died. It's certainly far older than many of the restaurants on the "Oldest Restaurants in the Area" list, although I can't find a founding year. I think it may go all the way back to the fifties, but I could be wrong.

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I stopped in here last night and ordered the shish kebab. Sadly our service wasn't as most of you described. Our server was rather brusque, and he was trying to upsell us in every area in a rather obvious and slightly irritating way. He clearly did not seem to keen on interacting with us. However, the person who was bringing out the food seemed quite nice and friendly. The shish kebab was not bad, though it could have benefitted from some kind of sauce to balance it out, since it seemed like the spices that were used ended up being a little on the burnt end. Otherwise it tasted ok. To me the prices seemed a little on the high end, but this is coming from going to lots of small kebab shops and delis.

The decor is definitely unique and very cool. A bit womb-like with all the reds. There were some awesome intricate silver orbs hanging from the ceilings, and a "waterfall" that we found slightly humorous. It was obviously just some regular plumbing pipes with holes punched in it.

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I like Mama Ayesha's and would describe the food as home-cooked Lebanese. With all the choices for Middle Eastern in the area, I don't go as there often as I did 10 years ago, but the quality of the food remains high. I especially like the stuffed grape leaves and hummus. I'm going to dig up a review of a MA's I wrote not too long ago and will post it here shortly. Bon appétit!

REVIEW

Mama Ayesha's has been around forever and pre-remodelling, it was a neighborhood hole in the wall, one of those hidden, humble places with great food. The food is still good, but the decor has been updated with hanging lanterns, sleek booths, and waterfalls.I usually start with the hummus, which is always smooth and delicious (and sometimes get the baba ganouj too). For the main, I like the menzaleh (a kind of eggplant casserole with ground meat and tomato sauce) or the stuffed grape leaves. Sometimes I get kibbeh too, which is crunchy and delicious, and the falafel, which is right up there with the best falafel in the city. Dessert is baklava, sweet, but not too sticky or gooey served with either a cup of Turkish coffee or hot tea. I've taken a lot of out-of-town guests here and they've always been happy with the home-cooked style of food and gracious service. I've also heard that long-time White House reporter Helen Thomas (who is Lebanese-American) dines here fairly regularly.

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I like Mama Ayesha's and would describe the food as home-cooked Lebanese. With all the choices for Middle Eastern in the area, I don't go as there often as I did 10 years ago, but the quality of the food remains high. I especially like the stuffed grape leaves and hummus. I'm going to dig up a review of a MA's I wrote not too long ago and will post it here shortly. Bon appétit!

REVIEW

Mama Ayesha's has been around forever and pre-remodelling, it was a neighborhood hole in the wall, one of those hidden, humble places with great food. The food is still good, but the decor has been updated with hanging lanterns, sleek booths, and waterfalls.I usually start with the hummus, which is always smooth and delicious (and sometimes get the baba ganouj too). For the main, I like the menzaleh (a kind of eggplant casserole with ground meat and tomato sauce) or the stuffed grape leaves. Sometimes I get kibbeh too, which is crunchy and delicious, and the falafel, which is right up there with the best falafel in the city. Dessert is baklava, sweet, but not too sticky or gooey served with either a cup of Turkish coffee or hot tea. I've taken a lot of out-of-town guests here and they've always been happy with the home-cooked style of food and gracious service. I've also heard that long-time White House reporter Helen Thomas (who is Lebanese-American) dines here fairly regularly.

Do they still have a jukebox that plays songs in Arabic? They did in the late 1960s, when Mama's was unique and the rage. I recall that you could park those huge cars that we had back then anywhere on Calvert Street with no problem.

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Do they still have a jukebox that plays songs in Arabic? They did in the late 1960s, when Mama's was unique and the rage.

I didn't notice a jukebox, but before the remodelling, I recall hearing Arabic music in the background. I should mention that I wasn't around in the late 1960's. I've been going to Mama Ayesha's off and on for about the last 15 years.

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I usually start with the hummus, which is always smooth and delicious (and sometimes get the baba ganouj too).

They are also beautiful, variations on a theme with tahini, lemon and garlic, and a reliable way to start your meal. The hummus ($5.95) is almost pale as white, with the contrasting low brown of chickpeas in the center. Baba ghanouj ($6.50) is a creamy beige, dotted with three black olives and slick with olive oil. Both are garnished with a few pink slivers of radish. The flavors are subdued but right, though the eggplant was missing the sweetness and jewel red of pomegranate arils that would sometimes appear in the old days, and it was light on smokiness. The pita was good for spooning, sturdy but not crispy, fused at one end but eventually revealing a pocket.

Warak inib mahshi ($15) isn’t exactly the same as it used to be; the grape leaves are rolled tighter into small torpedoes. There’s not a hint of grass or bitterness that can sometimes pop up at other places, just olive oil, lemon and salt, a dollop of thick house-made yogurt and a textural assertiveness against the soft, delicately flavored rice and ground lamb mixture within. these don’t seem like they were sitting around, though I suppose they must have been, and they are sufficiently satisfying enough to keep you from having to explore the rest of the menu – for decades on end. Mama’s talks up her secret spices all over the menu, but when it comes to cooking with them the kitchen is more restrained. That’s not a bad thing, just don’t expect the spicing to send you off on the kind of quest for knowledge that the palena chicken inspires.

Recollections come not exactly roaring back in a combination platter of shish kabab, kifta kabab, couscous, grape leaves, kibbeh, rice and vegetables ($21) – but reconfirm the strengths and weaknesses I’ve found here over the years. A crusty cube of grilled lamb starts with a hint of toughness but quickly turns tender and juicy. Two come on the plate, and with the exception of the grape leaves, I would have happily traded in everything else for more of them. The ground beef kebab and the kibbeh (ground lamb with cracked wheat) are good enough, but they need something to bring them to life, more than lemon or yogurt, maybe some fat or tomato sauce. A slice of grilled tomato shows how well mama ayesha’s can cook vegetables, while a carrot shows how badly; it’s soft enough to mash with a fork and provides about as much flavor as water. A grilled onion was burnt in spots, just under its skin, but still raw.

Two glasses of arak on ice ($6.50) each carried us pleasantly through our meal. The taste of licorice goes well with this food, if that’s what you like. The trappings seem to grow more opulent each time we visit, but you can still get in and out in roughly an hour if you don’t slow down your server, decline dessert (namoura made fresh that day) and choose not to linger over a demitasse of turkish coffee that’s bracing down to its dregs and can also be laced.

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Hey! I'm confused a bit by these posts! I found Mama Aisha's elegant, beautiful, and delightful. I did notice a couple of issues--it's hard to get to by metro (a couple of blocks walking or more) and it's hard to park around the Adams Morgan area. I also thought the food was Palestinian. Is it more Lebanese than Palestinian? Either way it was delightful, and unbelievably luxurious, as well as affordable. The only thing that prevents me from going there more often is the parking and (embarrassed): sometimes not knowing how to order. I had the delight of going there last with an Arabic language teacher and he helped all of us students order great and delicious foods, some were mezes, appetizers, but others were meals--like the chicken with powdered sugar--amazingly good food all around. I recommend the dining experience there as an A+ for food and ambiance. It's beautiful and a lovely and healthy experience all around.

I felt as though I was the guest of Royalty when we ate there.

That's a nice experience!

Tamara

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I guess I'm a little more gullible (laugh!) So, what does Helen order?

I could use a few suggestions from the menu, and don't tell me hummus, I love it, but that doesn't round out s meal at Mama Aisha's. They have an amazing menu there. I'd love some advice on how to order for two or three people. When we went in a group and my Ustath (prof) ordered, we all shared a delicious bunch of mezes. But if I go with 2 or 3 novices for dinner, how best to order for us? It's almost like asking how to be a great host. I'd love some advice.

Thanks,

Tamara

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Hey! I'm confused a bit by these posts! I found Mama Aisha's elegant, beautiful, and delightful. I did notice a couple of issues--it's hard to get to by metro (a couple of blocks walking or more) and it's hard to park around the Adams Morgan area. I also thought the food was Palestinian. Is it more Lebanese than Palestinian? Either way it was delightful, and unbelievably luxurious, as well as affordable. The only thing that prevents me from going there more often is the parking and (embarrassed): sometimes not knowing how to order. I had the delight of going there last with an Arabic language teacher and he helped all of us students order great and delicious foods, some were mezes, appetizers, but others were meals--like the chicken with powdered sugar--amazingly good food all around. I recommend the dining experience there as an A+ for food and ambiance. It's beautiful and a lovely and healthy experience all around.

I felt as though I was the guest of Royalty when we ate there.

That's a nice experience!

Tamara

Mama Ayesha's recently went through a serious upgrade in both design, accommodations and service. Thankfully, they did not suffer a corresponding decrease in quality--in fact many things have improved.

They are indeed Palestinian, but what Palestinians would call Lebanese, and more authentically so for it. (A Palestinian-Palestinian restaurant may very well have only hummous, fool, pickles, a fresh salad or two, and a couple of meats grilled over charcoal outside--what would be called a Lebanese restaurant would have more and more refined dishes in addition to the standards plus fish and a greater selection of mezze and salads).

They have always been one of my favorite restaurants in the area for as long as I have lived here, both when run down and now. Sadly, though, they do not serve k'naafa.

---

ETA [A brief note from your humble narrator - I love the fact that we have posts like this.]

Edited by DonRocks
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Helen Thomas, the incredible dean of the White House press corps, eats here just about every night. Enough said.

I simply don't believe this.

So, what does Helen order?

Obvious answer to your question and simultaneous proof of her presence:

Sultut Harateen (Helen's Salad) ($5.95): Diced tomatoes and red onions in olive oil and lemon juice. Add feta cheese ($1.50)*

They only name stuff after you if you show up a lot, right?

* Appetizer Menu

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Helen Thomas, the incredible dean of the White House press corps, eats here just about every night. Enough said.

I simply don't believe this.

(The only time I've seen Helen Thomas at a restaurant, btw, was at Bombay Club.)

I know that Helen used to dine there pretty often, but don't believe that she eats there almost every night either. Years ago (over 10) when I used to go to Mama Ayesha's fairly regularly, I did see her having dinner there on two occasions. Anyway, even if she did eat there every night, it wouldn't influence my opinion (or motivate me to go there more often). Now if we were talking about NBC's Brian Wiliams (who I once saw at Bistro Bis), that would be a different story. :angry:

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I treated myself to a Christmas present by having lunch at Mama Ayesha's today. It was really very good. I began with a credible kibbee nayee, one of the better versions around, but not quite the best. I followed with the combination of stuffings -- stuffed squash (koosa), stuffed cabbage (malfoof) and stuffed grape leaves (warak enab), all with lamb and rice stuffing. I declare these three stuffed items to be the best versions I have tasted in recent memory, and I hold this charming homage to eastern Mediterranean fare in the highest regard. The service was very gracious too. Count me a devotee...

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Got news for ya Barbara: "turn-arounds" don't have buildings attached to them.

That isn't a turn-around; that's a bathroom.

And what on earth is that hideous pipe running along the south sidewalk?

Cheers!

Rocks

[Edit: okay so it is a turn-around (scroll down to the fourth paragraph). But I know it's a bathroom because one day I approached a pulled-over Metrobus, folded-over at the waist because I had to tinkle so badly, and basically begged the driver to let me go in. He politely refused, explaining to me it was a facility for employees only. Desperate and forlorn, I found myself underneath the Ellington bridge within minutes.]

I had to bump this up after coming across a very interesting 1948 photograph on the Flickr Historic Washington pool:

CalvertStreetTurnaroundjgp_zpse27c43cb.j

It was a Toddle House! Also, I don't think streetcars ever turned around here; it was buses. You can see in the foreground the streetcar tracks go right by the turnaround area, not into it. The building has obviously been much modified (entirely for the worse), but it's clearly the same building.

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Saturday night when our group of four became a group of six- exceeding the capacity for an available table for an early-ish dinner at Mintwood Place we ended up at Mama Ayesha's. I know this sounds like a strange substitute, but there was some method to the madness. We were all heading for a party about two blocks away. One of our friends uses a cane and with the icy sidewalks we had a tight radius to work within. I've lived in DC for nearly thirteen years, in Cleveland Park for almost five and I've driven or walked by Mama Ayesha's several thousand times. So I was a little peeved when I found out we'd be eating dinner there- that was alleviated once informed that it was in fact not Ethiopian food (that is how little interest I had ever had in going there) but actually Middle Eastern.

I won't belabor the post. We and one of the other couples we were with have both recently returned from a visit to Israel our other friend used to work at State in that general part of the world, so our collective bar for food Middle Eastern was high. We all thought the food was pretty good. At a minimum far superior to Lebanese Taverna (or as I like to call it Lebanese Diarrhea) around the corner.

They have always been one of my favorite restaurants in the area for as long as I have lived here, both when run down and now. Sadly, though, they do not serve k'naafa.

---

ETA [A brief note from your humble narrator - I love the fact that we have posts like this.]

And, I agree that it is very sad that they do not have K'naafa on the menu. If anyone knows where to get it around here I will be most grateful.

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Obvious answer to your question and simultaneous proof of her presence:

Sultut Harateen (Helen's Salad) ($5.95): Diced tomatoes and red onions in olive oil and lemon juice. Add feta cheese ($1.50)*

They only name stuff after you if you show up a lot, right?

* Appetizer Menu

There was a time, mostly throughout the '80s and '90s, when she was reported to have eaten there almost every night, with a special table always reserved for her behind a curtain. In fact, Mama Ayesha's was considered her second home, and they held a memorial service in her honor last year:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/connie-lawn/memorial-lunch-for-helen-_b_3814923.html

They have always been one of my favorite restaurants in the area for as long as I have lived here, both when run down and now. Sadly, though, they do not serve k'naafa.

K'naafa is a baked dessert, so you'll find it regularly at Mediterranean Bakery in Alexandria, occasionally at the Lebanese Taverna's bakery in Arlington, and often at the newer Jenin Bakery on Backlick Road in Springfield.

And, I agree that it is very sad that they do not have K'naafa on the menu. If anyone knows where to get it around here I will be most grateful. 

See above.

Also, I would categorize their food more like "Levantine" which covers the pre-World War One geographic area of Greater Syria, now broken up into Lebanon, Israel, Syria, Jordan and Palestine. Like any geographic area of this size, there are minor regional subtleties and a few distinctly different specialties, but more or less, it's darn near the same food.

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I love this history of Mama Ayesha's on their website.

This restaurant has menu items not found anywhere else in the DC area.

Open in 1960, and renamed from Calvert Cafe after the passing of "Mama" Ayesha Abraham (passed 1993, renamed 1994 by her nephews and great-nephews), Mama Ayesha's qualifies for being on the Oldest Restaurants in the Washington, DC Area list.

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I know that Helen used to dine there pretty often, but don't believe that she eats there almost every night either. Years ago (over 10) when I used to go to Mama Ayesha's fairly regularly, I did see her having dinner there on two occasions. Anyway, even if she did eat there every night, it wouldn't influence my opinion (or motivate me to go there more often). Now if we were talking about NBC's Brian Wiliams (who I once saw at Bistro Bis), that would be a different story. biggrin.gif

What a great thread. Between the Landrum recollections, the Helen Thomas sub-plot, the newly-posted photo from the 60s (?), and the expert validations of the cuisine, this is exactly the kind of discussion that distinguishes this website from all others.

I'm no expert on Middle Eastern cuisine but have spent time in that part of the world and love the food. My first visit to Mama's was only about 12-14 years ago. And haven't been back in maybe 5-7. Reading a thread like this will likely prompt a bunch of revisits, including me.

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On 3/27/2020 at 4:22 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

Thought it might give each other ideas based on where and what you're ordering for take-out or delivery.  

Mama Ayesha's tonight. I picked up dinner for us and for 2 friends. Well managed ordering and delivery, although they did not have the garlic sauce. The whole menu is available. We did not order drinks, so I can't speak to that. Food traveled well.

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I love places that I like that have outside seating. None of us really want to eat inside right now. (I hope this can change soon.) So, 3 of us on the patio on Friday. We ate a TON of mezze. We considered getting a grilled entree to split, but the mezze were enough. Hummus, baba ganoush (I think they make the best in town. So smoky!), lebneh, sojuk, cheese, olives, and the pickled veg, cheese rolls. Extra pita! Sadly, the kibbee naya is not on the menu at the moment. Nice bottle of cheap lebanese wine.  I was the only one who wanted dessert - the boy was full and the other doesn't eat nuts, which limits his dessert choices there. So we headed back to our side of town and had beer at the Derby for dessert.

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13 hours ago, saf said:

 Sadly, the kibbee naya is not on the menu at the moment. 

Theirs was not always the best in the area, but it was good enough (for someone with the eponymous screen name).

The Lebanese cuisine in this area is credible, compared to most metropolitan areas not named New York, Los Angeles, or Detroit/Dearborn. Our selection of Mama Ayesha's, Lebanese Taverna, Me Jana, Mediterranean Bakery, Mediterranean Gourmet Market, Albi's in the Navy Yard, among a few others, is an abundance of goodness.

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