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Restaurants Open Saturday, December 19th


DonRocks
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Noncomprehensive report from The Village at Shrlington (data current as of my walk through the area at about 3:15 PM):

Carlyle - closed at 2 PM today, sign on the door says they will re-open for brunch at 9:30 AM tomorrow.

Capitol City Brew Pub - will open for dinner this evening at 6 PM

Guapo's - open

Bungalow - closed today, according to sign posted on front door

Aroma - appeared to be closed

PING - sidewalks were being cleared as if in preparation for opening, but don't know if it was restaurant employees or property management personnel doing the clearing.

Luna Grill - appeared to be closed

Extra Virgin - appeared to be open

Bonus Entry - I called Ramparts on Fern Street, guy who answered said they were open.

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In Old Town, the following spots are open (or were at around 5:30pm):

Grape & Bean

Caffe Fontaine

Hard Times - According to an email I received, all of their locations are open (but they encourage customers to use 'good judgment')

Light Horse

Many places are closed, including:

Vermilion

Majestic Cafe

Restaurant Eve

Tiffany Tavern

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You know... I have to ask why businesses stay open in situations like this. While I appreciate that everybody needs to make money and people appreciate places to go, the roads are nothing short of treacherous. Even if your customers are primarily within walking distance, what about your staff? Does the kitchen staff live nearby? How do the workers get home at 11 p.m. or later? Does the restaurant/store etc. cover the expenses of any accidents? I am not being snide, just genuinely concerned for people who may feel like they have to show up in order to keep their jobs.

I probably missed my calling as a union organizer.

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You know... I have to ask why businesses stay open in situations like this. While I appreciate that everybody needs to make money and people appreciate places to go, the roads are nothing short of treacherous. Even if your customers are primarily within walking distance, what about your staff? Does the kitchen staff live nearby? How do the workers get home at 11 p.m. or later? Does the restaurant/store etc. cover the expenses of any accidents? I am not being snide, just genuinely concerned for people who may feel like they have to show up in order to keep their jobs.

I probably missed my calling as a union organizer.

I said something similar to my husband today about grocery stores. I wondered if many were open today given that many of their employees probably use public transportation (which I think was largely shut down today).

My dad had to go to work today but his work sent a truck to come get him and will send him home the same way. Union job.

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A long, long time ago when I was fifteen my first job was as a waiter at the Hot Shoppes at Wisconsin and Van Ness-where "Broadcast House" is today. One night, in 1963, the hostess seated a single girl at my table. Outside it was snowing and the dining room was almost empty. I have no idea what we talked about but I have never forgot that night. It was an incredible experience talking to her, with snow falling outside which we could both see through the windows.

Several hours after she left I took a bus home to Takoma Park where my mother and I lived. Today, if this was happening anew, I would still be looking for a way home. Then, there were four inches of snow. Today, there have been over twenty. My guess is that given a similar situation years hence, I would look back on today and have a bit of anger for the restaurant having remained opened. That night there was a bus to take me home-I have the luxury of remembering her. But tonight, if I worked for a restaurant that remained open with a blizzard forecast, who knows where I would have spent the night.

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A long, long time ago when I was fifteen my first job was as a waiter at the Hot Shoppes at Wisconsin and Van Ness-where "Broadcast House" is today. One night, in 1963, the hostess seated a single girl at my table. Outside it was snowing and the dining room was almost empty. I have no idea what we talked about but I have never forgot that night. It was an incredible experience talking to her, with snow falling outside which we could both see through the windows.

Several hours after she left I took a bus home to Takoma Park where my mother and I lived. Today, if this was happening anew, I would still be looking for a way home. Then, there were four inches of snow. Today, there have been over twenty. My guess is that given a similar situation years hence, I would look back on today and have a bit of anger for the restaurant having remained opened. That night there was a bus to take me home-I have the luxury of remembering her. But tonight, if I worked for a restaurant that remained open with a blizzard forecast, who knows where I would have spent the night.

Joe - If this were to happen now, I think we all know where you would have spent the night

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You know... I have to ask why businesses stay open in situations like this. While I appreciate that everybody needs to make money and people appreciate places to go, the roads are nothing short of treacherous. Even if your customers are primarily within walking distance, what about your staff? Does the kitchen staff live nearby? How do the workers get home at 11 p.m. or later? Does the restaurant/store etc. cover the expenses of any accidents? I am not being snide, just genuinely concerned for people who may feel like they have to show up in order to keep their jobs.

I probably missed my calling as a union organizer.

First, I think there's a certain (for lack of a better word) machismo about the business that encourages it. "No damn snow is going to shut my restaurant down!" There's a section in "The Making of a Chef" where Michael Ruhlman, (at the CIA as a student/journalist, if you haven't read it) tries to wimp out of a class because there's been a blizzard and it's a long drive. His instructor basically says, "hey, you're just a writer and not really a student, so do whatever you want...wimp. But actual, real chefs make it in no matter what." And so Ruhlman drives in and gets all giddy about being just like a real cook.

And second, it's not like a law firm, where if you don't bill your hours on Saturday, you can work overtime Sunday. If you close Saturday night, that money is gone forever.

Chefs, waiters, busboys and diswashers will walk through blizzards, while hungover, with broken bones to go to work. It's just what you do. One place I worked rented rooms for the staff at a nearby hotel. They sure as hell didn't make enough money to cover the hotel bill (though people who slog through snow to drink, drink hard and tip well), but they did prove their mettle. And I've heard of restaurant staffs sleeping on the banquets overnight. The show must go on.

(This is predicated on it being physically possible and it's not necessarily universal. I'm not calling Dean a wimp because he didn't rent a dogsled to come down, just suggesting that it's a pretty common attitude.)

ETA: I've heard that one of the best ways to get a last-minute table at a hot restaurant is to wait for a blizzard and pick up a cancellation. Should have tried for Komi last night.

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I was happy to see so many places in Clarendon open last night: Hard Times, Liberty Tavern, Harry's Tap Room, Restaurant 3, Whitlows and Boulevard Woodgrill as we didn't have much in the fridge and didn't feel like taking to the stores during the pre-storm madness. We ended up at Restaurant 3 and I had a steak salad which was a nice change of pace from what we had in the fridge and a very good chocolate bread pudding.

Wish I would have checked on here, would have gone to Ray's!

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Yeah - I walked through much of Arlington yesterday hitting places. At Ragtime the bartender mentioned that their owner was getting hotel rooms for the guys opening Dogwood Tavern this morning. From there I went to Ireland's Four Courts, which was fairly packed, then up to Kitty O'Shea's, Ri Ra, Liberty Tavern, and then to O'Sullivan's, before walking up to Ballston to watch a couple of Bruce Campbell flicks with Marshall. I was surprised to see so many places open and so many people out.

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