Jump to content

Recommended Posts

L'Etape - 89 rue de convention

small place with great food. a neighborhood kind of place

My favorite kind of place but you may want to try L'Ardoise as well...near the Tuilleries...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ethnic sandwich thread reminded me of a good place for a quick bite in the Marais: L'As du Fallafel! It on the rue des Rosiers right off of the rue vieille du temple. I really like Amsterdam here in DC, but there's something about l'As...the balls are...fluffy... :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband and I are leaving for 2 wonderful weeks in Paris on Sat and we have an apartment so I am thinking what a wonderful opportunity to actually be able to cook and use all the wonderful markets and shops. We would appreciate any recommendations as far as opinions on the best open markets, boulangeries, fromageries etc..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My husband and I are leaving for 2 wonderful weeks in Paris on Sat and we have an apartment so I am thinking what a wonderful opportunity to actually be able to cook and use all the wonderful markets and shops. We would appreciate any recommendations as far as opinions on the best open markets, boulangeries, fromageries etc..

Fauchon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What arrondisement are you staying in? There are market streets and there are market days. I find I like the market streets better. Check Egullet.com (is it okay to suggest this?) out for an extensive list of markets and cheese shops that have been compiled by John Talbott.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I definitely enjoy going to the smaller vendors at markets and market streets more often, it's fun to check out the Grande Epicerie at the Bon Marche department store on the Left Bank. Along the lines of a Harrod's food hall.

There is a great place to buy roast chicken on the right bank near Tuileries garden - Poularde Ste Honoree I believe, on Rue Marche St Honoree. Across from it is a fantastic wine bar, Le Rubis, one of the oldest in Paris I believe - casual atmosphere to grab a tumbler full of wine. There's also an oyster/seafood place within the same block or two that is supposed to be very good - Tom S. reviewed it in the Northwest Airline magazine.

We unfortunately didn't have time to fit Pierre Herme into the schedule for pastries, but that's on my list for next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What arrondisement are you staying in? There are market streets and there are market days. I find I like the market streets better. Check Egullet.com (is it okay to suggest this?) out for an extensive list of markets and cheese shops that have been compiled by John Talbott.

We are staying on Blvd Arago right on the cusp of the 13th and 5th. I know we are close to Rue Mouffetard market. I have been to Paris twice, but never to the markets. Thanks for your advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We are staying on Blvd Arago right on the cusp of the 13th and 5th. I know we are close to Rue Mouffetard market. I have been to Paris twice, but never to the markets. Thanks for your advice.
As i remember Rue Arago, most of it is in the 13th running into the 14th. Rue Mouffetard is a sweet market street. You have an Androuet Cheese Shop there which is decent. A couple of patisseries and boulangeries. That said, I would not spend too much time there except for a lovely romantic stroll. The Androuet shop was sold years ago and now just carries the Androuet name. For cheese my absolute favorite is La Fromagerie Boursault (14th} This shop is owned by an apprentice of Ann-Marie Cantal, who most people consider the best fromagerie in Paris if not France. Boursault is just as good but at half the price. They will take you to vist their aging caves if you ask nicely. A wineshop that is quite near you is owned by a little old guy, (if he hasn't died), whohas owned the shop for 50 years. He has an incredible collection of old wines at incredible prices and well stored. His original location was much larger but he has moved. He is directly across the street for Hotel L'Esperance in the 5th. Look up this hotel and meander by. You will not be displesed! As for markets, I am not too familiar with street markets in the area, but just walk around! I am familiar with the 13th closer to Place D'Italie, their market is on Tuesdays and Fridays if not mistaken.

For a true shock, get on the RER and take the quick ride to La Defense (The Arche). This takes you to a mall at La Defense.Once there, go to L'Auchon Hypermarche. This is a hypermarket for the masses, but their produce, meats, fish, anything at all, will put the best gourmet shop in our area to shame. Their prices are incredible also.

If you have any questions, PM me. Until about 3 weeks ago I traveled to Paris at least twice per month if not 5 times per month. It is my absolute favorite city in the world, if I can be of any help let me know. I will be back in the City of Lights for Christmas, I can't wait.

By the way, the 13th is a wonderful area to be away from the touristy areas of Paris. It is mostly locals there. Stay away from restos near the typical touristy areas of the Seine, Montmartre, Ile St Louis, Rue St Honore, etc....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As i remember Rue Arago, most of it is in the 13th running into the 14th. Rue Mouffetard is a sweet market street. You have an Androuet Cheese Shop there which is decent. A couple of patisseries and boulangeries. That said, I would not spend too much time there except for a lovely romantic stroll. The Androuet shop was sold years ago and now just carries the Androuet name. For cheese my absolute favorite is La Fromagerie Boursault (14th} This shop is owned by an apprentice of Ann-Marie Cantal, who most people consider the best fromagerie in Paris if not France. Boursault is just as good but at half the price. They will take you to vist their aging caves if you ask nicely. A wineshop that is quite near you is owned by a little old guy, (if he hasn't died), whohas owned the shop for 50 years. He has an incredible collection of old wines at incredible prices and well stored. His original location was much larger but he has moved. He is directly across the street for Hotel L'Esperance in the 5th. Look up this hotel and meander by. You will not be displesed! As for markets, I am not too familiar with street markets in the area, but just walk around! I am familiar with the 13th closer to Place D'Italie, their market is on Tuesdays and Fridays if not mistaken.

For a true shock, get on the RER and take the quick ride to La Defense (The Arche). This takes you to a mall at La Defense.Once there, go to L'Auchon Hypermarche. This is a hypermarket for the masses, but their produce, meats, fish, anything at all, will put the best gourmet shop in our area to shame. Their prices are incredible also.

If you have any questions, PM me. Until about 3 weeks ago I traveled to Paris at least twice per month if not 5 times per month. It is my absolute favorite city in the world, if I can be of any help let me know. I will be back in the City of Lights for Christmas, I can't wait.

By the way, the 13th is a wonderful area to be away from the touristy areas of Paris. It is mostly locals there. Stay away from restos near the typical touristy areas of the Seine, Montmartre, Ile St Louis, Rue St Honore, etc....

Thanks RaisaB! I am going to print this out and take it with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wineshop does not have a formal name. Jean-Claude Rossi and Jean-Loup Michel are the owners. The address is 16, rue Pascal 75005 Paris. tel: 01 43 31 31 28

La Fromagerie Boursault 71, Avenue de General LeClerc, 75014 Paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The wineshop does not have a formal name. Jean-Claude Rossi and Jean-Loup Michel are the owners. The address is 16, rue Pascal 75005 Paris. tel: 01 43 31 31 28

La Fromagerie Boursault 71, Avenue de General LeClerc, 75014 Paris

We're going to be back in Paris in November. Thanks for giving us a couple of new places to shop. How about Madrid?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When we went to Au Pied de Cochon in Montreal this past June, we were standing in line waiting for a table, and watched the waiters set a five-level plateau at a four-top of young men. They had to stand up to eat, it was so tall. There was an abundance of iced shellfish and mollusks on the lower levels, and cooked or fried things on the upper levels, like lobster and crabs. Mama mia! It was a jaw-dropping display. When we were seated and given menus, we were astonished to see that there was an even larger, six-level plateau available--for more than $400! Jonathan settled on the single, which was a generous-enough selection of oysters, cockles, shrimp, crab, sea snails, etc. on ice. I had foie gras. We didn't rush through our meal, but even so, as we were leaving, the four-top was still working on their plateau.

Stephen B wrote: "It’s simply not as complex as those I've had at Balthazar in New York or La Coupole in Paris or Au Pied de Cochon in Montreal."

I ate at La Coupole in Paris about 3 years ago and can categorically state that absolutely everything about that place sucked. The nasty maitre 'd, the 45 minute wait, the terrible, disinterested waiters, the lousy food, the stingy plateau de fruits de mer. A complete rip-off.

I actually like the shellfish platter at Oceanaire. It would be better if the cold poached items were poached in court bouillion rather than water, but the various sauces are good. Still, the best deal in town is at the Old Ebbitt. The half price deal only makes it sweeter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I ate at La Coupole in Paris about 3 years ago and can categorically state that absolutely everything about that place sucked. The nasty maitre 'd, the 45 minute wait, the terrible, disinterested waiters, the lousy food, the stingy plateau de fruits de mer. A complete rip-off.

How is your French?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How is your French?

Excellent. Plus, I went there with a French person. The fruits de mer was a meager platter, nothing special. The captain and waiters were downright unfriendly. The only amusing part of the evening was the wait for a table. When you check in with the maitre d', he hands you a card with the name of a composer on it. When your table is ready he shouts out to the bar "Beethoven!" "Mozart"! "Scarlatti"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in France at the moment. I just had dinner at a new restaurant named Spring. It is run by a young American named Chris. Seats 16 covers. It has been open 7 weeks. So far it has been reviewed by Figaro 3 hearts, a couple of other local publications, and Michelin is actually including it in it's guide next year. Yesterday it was voted the most improbale restaurant to make it this past year. Pretty premature but still pretty neat for this young guy.

We had four couses tonight, 26 euros, Cauliflower soup with Pigeon and Balsamic Reduction, Calamari with a Radish and Pepper Olive Oil Relish, Pork Confit with Oyster Mushrooms and a Chard Cream Sauce which alludes me. The dessert was a Chocalate Tart sans Tart with Carameled Pecans and a Mango Coulis with Fresh Mango. It was all honestly very simple, but the quality of the ingredients spoke for themselves. It was honestly one of hte best meals I have had here in a long time. The simplicity and the honesty of the ingredients blew you away. This young man is on a roll. I wish him the best. If you make it here, reserve in advance, you will not be dissapointed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Merry Christmas to all of the seasonal expats (!) who have crossed the Pond and are cooking Christmas dinner today in Paris!!! Back in the States we toast you....several times....well, many times~!~! Merry Christmas!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone read the article in the NY Times on The Best Steak Frites in Paris? I'm intrigued by his description of Le Severo. Good entrecote, frites, and boudin noir - sounds like my idea of heaven. We'll be in Paris in early June and lucky for us, Le Severo is only 3.5 km or 4 Metro stops from our hotel (which is in the Rue Cler area - a gastronomic adventure in of itself!).

Can any fellow travellers comment on any of the bistros Bittman writes about??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Consider La Bourse ou La Vie. 12 rue de Vivienne 75002. 20-30 seats, rowdy chef/owner has limited verbal inhibitions. Wear your maple leaf, talk softly and study surly french vernacular slang. Closed Saturday and Sunday. Expensive but everything housemade. Bourse metro. Picholine olive green colored Line #3.

Mr. Bittman's temperatures of cookery translation is erroneous.

Bleu = rare

Saignant = mid-rare

A Point = medium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, crap. I should have listed to M. Farci's recommendation because Mr. Bittman's blew chunks.

We went to Severo with the expectations of having the best steak frites ever. What we got was a decent cut of steak, cooked to the proper temperature, but without any seasoning whatsoever. I don't know if this is typical of steak frites in France (I highly doubt it) but it was so not worth the wait. Very disappointing.

The frites themselves were nicely done - crisp on the outside and creamy on the inside. No fault there. They were the "thick cut" fries.

We also had the steak tartare and it was....OK. Again, the main problem was lack of flavour. Maybe it's my crude North American tastebuds, but it tasted like the finest ground steak mixed with ketchup. And LOTS of it. I guess I was expecting subtle hints of mustard and anchovy, combined with the crunch of cornichons, and the brine of capers. My bad.

Still, to this day, the best hanger steak I've ever had (other than my own ;) ) is at RtC. The best steak tartare I've ever had is at Les Halles. The best fries I've ever had came from a chip wagon in Ottawa (doused, for God's sake, I mean doused in salt and vinegar!!).

One favorable comment - I had the boudin noir for a starter and it was excellent!! My wife's salad with chevre was exceptional. FWIW - this seemed to be a continuing theme for most of our meals in France. The appetizers were outstanding, while the entrees disappointed.

The one meal that was great from beginning to end was thanks to Waitman's recommendation: Le Petit Tournneau near Rue Cler served up some very tasty andouilette indeed!! Thanks for the hint! We chatted with the chef/owner for about half an hour as we finished our meal and wine. A very lovely lady. And while I'm giving Waitman his props, thanks for recommending Marie-Anne Cantin's fromagerie (on Rue Champs de Mars near the Rue Cler area). They no longer ship to the States since all their cheese is made with raw milk and they don't feel like dealing with the hassles imposed by the US FDA. But we had them vacuum seal a whole bunch of stinky cheeses and we brought 'em home with us anyways!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My quest for the best baguette in Paris may be complete. La Fournee d'Augustine, at 96, rue Raymond Losserand, in the 14th. This place has won "best baguette" awards numerous times in the last 4 years, which I don't always trust as meaningful, but wow. I've rerouted my walk to school so I can pass by this place every day.

Also, with apologies to those whose strawberry tarts I've tried and loved, they have the best one of those too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×