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DonRocks

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Great exhibit, except the photos of his time in NYC which seemed primarily to be "me and my friends sitting around in apartments."

Why is it that the kinds of black and white "my time in NYC portraits" that tend to show up in serious exhibits always look like they're staged in the rattiest shithole apartments on earth? I've had family and friends who lived in some pretty nasty places in NYC, and all have managed to clean up and make the places pleasant enough. The apartments in those photos looked dreadful. Of course, compared to some of the places I've seen in Beijing, maybe Weiwei didn't have very high expectations for apartment life.

Weiwei's photos and films depicted a grim side of Beijing. I've been there a few times and it always seems a little sad.

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It is important to be fluid with the sciences as well as the arts. Thus, this evening's lecture about FFIs.

The number one problem with swimming pools, according to the Centers for Disease Control, may not be what you think:

"Regular bowel movements – what CDC delicately refers to as a 'formed fecal incident' – isn’t so much a worry. But diarrhea is."

Have a nice day,

Rocks.

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It is important to be fluid with the sciences as well as the arts. Thus, this evening's lecture about FFIs.

The number one problem with swimming pools, according to the Centers for Disease Control, may not be what you think:

"Regular bowel movements – what CDC delicately refers to as a 'formed fecal incident' – isn’t so much a worry. But diarrhea is."

I still can't wait to swim this summer!

(Okay, let's leave it at "float and try not to get harpooned" but we'll work on it from there.)

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I still can't wait to swim this summer!

(Okay, let's leave it at "float and try not to get harpooned" but we'll work on it from there.)

Summer is coming.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAa0e7apG20

I am so sad to realize that what I always thought was the most beautiful line in this song: "Hetzi olam b'tochak mitkayam (Inside of you half of the world exists, or Half of the whole world is there inside you)" is really "Hetzi olam b'dochek mitkayam (Half the world is pushed up on itself, or Half the world lives crammed together)".

I will go back to believing the first version in my mind, a love song from father and son to a mother who is not there, as shown in the video.

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Michael, there seem to be pretty strong political overtones in that song, but they might be symbolic.

Great art can always be interpreted on many levels, depending on your own personal experiences.

What is the title of this beautiful, sad piece, when was it recorded, and is that Shlomo Artzi's son?

I'm trying, unsuccessfully, to get the video to come back onto the screen, rather than just the link.

I have one of these of my own which you might appreciate:

La Maison du Bonheur, by Francis Lalanne. It doesn't translate well, but:

"Un jardin sur la mer; un chagrin jeté comme un fruit amer."

"A garden on the sea; a grief cast away like a bitter fruit."

And the chorus:

"Ce serait la maison du bonheur; même a fort loyer, je suis preneur."

"This would be my house of happiness; even if the rent is high, I'll take it."

Great. Nothing like starting your day with a good cry.

Matt, if you ever see this, this was our favorite song.

It doesn't directly imply a lost love, but it does - to me.

At some time later in life, take a good hour and learn it.

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Alessandro Deljavan - remember this one.

"When Deljavan plays, he becomes so involved in the music — contorting his face into grimaces, squints and other expressions, and sometimes humming or singing along — that it earned him the distinctive but pejorative label of “eccentric.”"

I had some of the classic Glenn Gould recordings on vinyl, and his humming was audible. Never could decide if it was distracting or quirkily charming. But some musicians are damn near unwatchable on stage. I could always close my eyes and just listen, but I actually like watching musicians play their instruments.

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Never could decide if it was distracting or quirkily charming. But some musicians are damn near unwatchable on stage. I could always close my eyes and just listen, but I actually like watching musicians play their instruments.

I felt that way when I had to suffer through a performance by Lang Lang, it was not hard to see why some refer to him as Bang Bang.

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I had some of the classic Glenn Gould recordings on vinyl, and his humming was audible. Never could decide if it was distracting or quirkily charming. But some musicians are damn near unwatchable on stage. I could always close my eyes and just listen, but I actually like watching musicians play their instruments.

I'm pretty sure I've shared this video before here, but at 1:57, Gould gets up from the piano, thinks about why the piece isn't working, and comes back to change it. This note from a friend of mine who is the best amateur pianist I've ever met and knows what he's talking about:

"You know where he gets up and thinks about why the C minor counterpoint isn't working? This is REAL, not canned for the camera. He is trying to figure out whether you follow the line or keep it parallel for the middle voices. Like it or not, fucking the most pure genius of all time. Makes Heifetz and Horowitz look like Montessori students."

You have to watch this entire three-minute video to recognize the genius in it:

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"People Obsessed With The Piano" for 500, Alex:



As an added bonus, and to tie into another thread, a $100 GC to anyone who comes up with a passable translation.

[Editor's Note: Six incomprehensible posts merged together, and three apparently completely erroneous attempts at using Google Translate deleted - ML, for those of us Nasty Goys, could you at least tell us what this is so we can have some sort of clue? Piano-obsessed, yes, but it is my musical medium and it's possible for someone to have a stab at comprehending it without having attended Hebrew School for ten years. This, despite Gould, Heifitz, and Horowitz all having been Jewish. To an average reader (at least without further guidance), some of these videos are akin to watching a 1950s Israeli version of Hee Haw. The following paragraph is a start, but what in the name of Elohim *is* all this stuff - how about a one-paragraph footnote for each, preferably not written under the influence of psilocybin mushrooms? DR]

And for any one interested in cultural history, the Banai's are kinda like the Andrew Sisters, but like over three generations. In fact, I think there was a great documentary from a while back called "All My Banai'm" which is a great play on words between bnai'im, which means "builders" and bna'im, which means "sons" or "offspring".

Believe it or not, "Lehakat Zahal" is one of the hardest units to get into, and seeing one of their shows is just one of the interminable tortures one must endure as a soldier. Check that, probably THE most interminable torture...

The girls being so hot just made it worse...

For example:



Or:



Wait, what is Ashton Kutchner doing there?



Now I think I am in love. How did they get Eric Rohmer to direct this?



He does do a great song, Fathers and Sons (Credit to Turgenov):



Poor girl, doesn't know she is singing about something horrible happening to her.

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With James Gandolfini having passed away I was thinking about the Soprano's:

An eloquent discussion about the wonders of Italian food from two characters on the Sopranos.

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[Editor's Note: Six incomprehensible posts merged together, and three apparently completely erroneous attempts at using Google Translate deleted - ML, for those of us Nasty Goys, could you at least tell us what this is so we can have some sort of clue? Piano-obsessed, yes, but it is my musical medium and it's possible for someone to have a stab at comprehending it without having attended Hebrew School for ten years. This, despite Gould, Heifitz, and Horowitz all having been Jewish. To an average reader (at least without further guidance), some of these videos are akin to watching a 1950s Israeli version of Hee Haw. The following paragraph is a start, but what in the name of Elohim *is* all this stuff - how about a one-paragraph footnote for each, preferably not written under the influence of psilocybin mushrooms? DR]

Sorry Don, I guess I just assumed that more people would automatically make the connection to this, musically:

Maybe I just grew up with too many Gulag stories in my head.

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I sent the text to some colleagues in Israel. They had their translator work on it. Here is his translation:

A Pistol

Eviatar Banai

Lay down on the floor in forty degree heat with one hundred percent humidity

Why the fear, I'll do you no harm

I'm just locking the door and quiet, don't speak

Give me your shirt, I'll wring out the sweat and cool my face

We'll cut the dress with a scissors and take care not to scratch your skin

I'm hot and bitter, in just a minute we'll begin to play

Give me your hand

We'll tie it to the piano

And we'll play games

Between me and the floor you wipe away a tear

The body laughed, the body yelled, there is silence once again and the clock is

heard like a sigh

Wipe your nose, open your mouth I return once more

One last game and that's it

We'll take a small pistol out of the pocket and cock it

One short bullet quietly

A body becomes a corpse

Everyone weeps, everyone weeps

Your mother cries and I want my mother

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I should add that my colleague editorialized the following: Lately, Eviatar Banai has become a religious person. I'm wonder if he still 'stand behind' this song…

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"People Obsessed With The Piano" for 500, Alex:

Fine. Here's Sasha Katsman and Don Rockwell debating the relative merits of Emil Gilels, and here's a *perfect* example of what we're arguing - a popular song that even non-pianists may be familiar with, the 3rd movement of Beethoven Moonlight Sonata.

---------------

Everything inside these dashed lines is optional reading/viewing material, In case anyone is interest in the context of our debate. It's absolutely worth viewing and knowing, but unnecessary toward understanding the final points made.

Sasha compared Gilel's Hammerklavier 3rd movement fugue in contrast to Richter's:

Gilels, fugue starts at 34:00;

vs. Richter's here:

After I (apparently) wrongly defended Gilels (and mind you, I think Richter is a space alien who somehow managed to land on this planet, and integrate into earth's population and fool everyone into thinking he was human) for being very old and physically worn out when he recorded this (his recording is slower and clearly less edge-of-your-seat dynamic than Richter's), Sasha replied thusly, after concluding that I wasn't picking up on his inferences:

---------------

Sasha: "OK. There is no way Gilels would play something slowly due to technical deficiencies. I think the Scarlatti Sonata I pointed out two weeks ago speaks for itself. His technique was built to articulate, and to let the music express itself ( as opposed to superimposing vivid expressionism ). He knew how to create space and time, i.e. how to sculpt the music. He never compressed time the way Richter did, and, as Don rightly points out never climaxed unpredictably - something which Richter also did on occasion, often playing himself into a corner from a development standpoint, e.g. check out R's Scriabin's 5th. Everything I just described is the foundation of a great and important piano school, but the question is, what did Gilels himself do with it? How far did he take it?

I see two problems. One, with all the mastery and pedigree, his color and dynamics are fairly average. What's worse, his use of space ( which remarkably exists even when he plays very fast ) only exposes this problem further. If you sit back and play a significant harmonic shift in a transparent way, one that isn't overridden with performer's subjective emotions, you better make sure the listener is on the edge of his seat in anticipation. Rarely the case with him.
Two, of all the things said here, I can't even begin to agree with the statement that he has soul coming out of his ass. If this point is too subjective to argue about, then lets just leave it alone. Perhaps you see his soul expressed in a struggle against self-imposed overriding constraints of social realism, but to me it sounds like he often answers the "what" question and rarely the "why"."
---------------
Don: What you're saying is that he's Mozart, not Beethoven!

Your harmonic shift comment resonated with me the most. Richter telegraphed that it was coming; but doesn't that defeat the point of Subito Forte?!

So Richter is Hitchcock, showing the viewer the ticking bomb, allowing the beads of sweat to develop in anticipation, whereas Gilels is Tarantino, showing the bomb going off unexpectedly and everyone dying in one big, loud explosion?

I think that's unfair to Gilels - it also may not be what you're saying.

He doesn't have soul coming *out* his ass; he has soul that *can't* come out of his ass - he is *the* most constipated player I have ever heard - but make no mistake about it: he needs to take a shit the size of Baja California. Unlike Brendel who's a vegan and takes a three-inch crap once a week.

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Mellower (relatively speaking) than the version they played at the 9:30 Club last weekend and totally  B) .  Really in the groove here.  This gave me a big smile.

http://bit.ly/18fRkbH

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