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On June 7, 2016 at 6:04 AM, DonRocks said:

They still had the "no right turn" signs in the Thomas Circle area - artifacts from the 1970's when people would take right turns to pick up street prostitutes (these signs may have actually lasted into the early aughts of this century, and many people had no idea what they were for).

Those went up in the 80s - the late 80s, I think. We were living at 15th and O in 1987, and they were very new then.

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"#TBT: Why Patrick Clark's Culinary Legacy Still Matters" by Gary Duff on capitolfile-magazine.com

(For those of you who don't remember - I suspect a large majority - Patrick Clark was the 1994 James Beard Award winner for Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic: one of the very first.)

I think this article is a nice thought, but it's nearly devoid of content, and not an appropriate tribute. It is, however, a cautionary tale about how quickly things are often forgotten.

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10 minutes ago, Mark Slater said:

Anyone remember the Golden Bull on L St.?

I don't but am going to take a guess.  Was it a Blackie's restaurant?

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38 minutes ago, Mark Slater said:

Anyone remember the Golden Bull on L St.?

I remember the Golden Bull in Adelphi.

GoldenBull.jpg

Gaithersburg?

GoldenBullG.jpg

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10 hours ago, Mark Slater said:

Anyone remember the Golden Bull on L St.?

Gaithersburg still exists. 

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16 hours ago, DaveO said:

I don't but am going to take a guess.  Was it a Blackie's restaurant?

Not Blackie. It was near 16th and L.  

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1 hour ago, Josh Radigan said:

Massive space, delayed opening which forces restaurants to spend cash that they don't have, a concept that has an above normal overhead costs in payroll, and a location off the path. It's tough to open restaurants in this day and age and with the world of Uber making it easier for people in the burbs to travel into the city, Clarendon has had its fare share of struggles in the last 12 months. Where Mister Days sits now used to be a brew pub, and I just can't remember the name but it started with Blue. That restaurant bubble is about to pop.

Blue and Gold, and that was my go-to spot for a burger and a beer around 2000.

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Bingo! Your memory is far better than my Mr. Rockwell. That was when Clarendon started its boom. Now I am afraid the boom will be for another reason, minus those who are great restaurateurs and know how to run a business.

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2 hours ago, Josh Radigan said:

Massive space, delayed opening which forces restaurants to spend cash that they don't have, a concept that has an above normal overhead costs in payroll, and a location off the path. It's tough to open restaurants in this day and age and with the world of Uber making it easier for people in the burbs to travel into the city, Clarendon has had its fare share of struggles in the last 12 months. Where Mister Days sits now used to be a brew pub, and I just can't remember the name but it started with Blue. That restaurant bubble is about to pop.

Blue & Gold is what that place was called. They used to sell 32 oz beers and an especially potent brew called Old Crankcase that tasted about as good as it sounds. Good times.

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10 hours ago, dcs said:

This got me looking for my favorite long-lost Chinese restaurant, Hsian Foong in Arlington. It wasn't on the interactive map, but I found a WaPo review that mentioned my favorite dishes, sesame broccoli with cabbage and Hsian Foong chicken.

Mar 15, 1984 - "Cantonese Revival Hsian Foong" by Barbara Rothschild and Daniel Zwerdling on washingtonpost.com

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Though I was an early participant on this site, I have not been living in DC for nearly ten years now, and have not been back to this Board for a bit longer than that (holy growth, batman!).  I stop by now for a hint of nostalgia and to say hello to all the folks here.

I had an all-out full sensory dream last night about the $5 pork shoulder sandwich with green sauce ($8 if you added provolone and broccoli rabe) that Roberto Donna would make himself in Galileo's grill/laboratorio space a couple times of week in the mid-2000s.  To this day, it is the best sandwich I've ever had.  Better than any hamburger, any lobster roll, and French Dip, any of the legendary options at Darwin's in Cambridge, MA, or any at Furstenburg's Breadline.  Even better than DiNic's in Philly's venerated version.  Donna's bread was so flavorful and perfect-crumbed, and the green sauce so complimentary that I've never even thought about trying to re-create it despite such simple ingredients. 

I hope this blast from the past finds a few kindred folks here eager to reminisce about the explosion of DC's food scene around that time, even while we have so many great resources in Don's own Dining Guide to do just that. 

Cheers all, from the West Coast.

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Hi Tenunda and thanks for your nostalgic post. I also remember how wonderful Roberto Donna's pork shoulder sandwich with green sauce in Laboratorio space tasted especially after navigating the line that would snake around the dining room. Actually recall seeing Senator Mark Warner have lunch at a table and perhaps wondering why all these people were walking back to the kitchen. 

However your thread title reminds me more of my youth and my default favorite sandwich at Shackey's  Pizza Parlor in Tysons Corner. Their Steak and Cheese Sub was just a perfect combination of bread, thin grilled steak and cheese. I use to go there so frequently they knew my order especially my teenage age days working at the mall.

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Re-reading the Galileo Grill thread was a pleasure yesterday after a long day at work. Thanks for the memory tickler!

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2 hours ago, DanielK said:

Re-reading the Galileo Grill thread was a pleasure yesterday after a long day at work. Thanks for the memory tickler!

A simpler time, to be sure. The Galileo III thread is also a fun read.

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5 hours ago, Genevieve said:

I had my first taste of Cambodian food in a nice little Arlington restaurant around 30 years ago, but that place has sadly closed.

Apr 28, 1988 - "Review: The Cambodian Restaurant" by Joan Horwitt on washingtonpost.com

What a wonderful stroll down memory lane (even though I have no memory of this restaurant) - thank you for posting this. How do you find such things?

Remember Queen Bee? It wasn't all that long ago, but it seems like an entire generation. 

Whoops! I guess it *is* an entire generation! ^_^

On 2/17/2017 at 1:25 PM, Genevieve said:

This got me looking for my favorite long-lost Chinese restaurant, Hsian Foong in Arlington. It wasn't on the interactive map, but I found a WaPo review that mentioned my favorite dishes, sesame broccoli with cabbage and Hsian Foong chicken.

Mar 15, 1984 - "Cantonese Revival Hsian Foong" by Barbara Rothschild and Daniel Zwerdling on washingtonpost.com

You've been around the block a few times, Genevieve! :)

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I saw the Cambodian restaurant in the same Washingtonian interactive map that dcs posted.  Saw it earlier this year, forgot about it until someone just asked about Cambodian restaurants.

I grew up here, so my memory goes back a ways (though it's quite fallible). Hsian Foong was my favorite place for Chinese food in middle/high school.

I miss Queen Bee, but I miss Cafe Dalat more, since that's where my husband and I went regularly for years, pre- and post-kid.

 

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1 hour ago, BookGuy said:

While I am feeling somewhat nostalgic about eating options in the Twin Towers, I remember when I moved to Rosslyn in the early 1980's, that complex had a restaurant called New York, New York which closed in a few years after I moved to Rosslyn.  Although I was young then and, therefore, had no basis for comparison, it reminded me of what a typical Manhattan eatery was like with a break menu of surf and surf, something like I imagined Toots Shor's or Jack Dempsey's must have been.  The closest that my fading memory can come to describing something similar would be Joe's, the Miami transplant on fifteenth street near the White House.

Tivoli was kind of old school.

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2 hours ago, DonRocks said:

Tivoli was kind of old school.

I LOVED Tivoli. Tony was the waitstaff stalwart, and now serves the busy dining room at Lebanese Taverna Tysons Galleria. We underappreciate the really good waitstaff we have in this area, some of whom are reason for going there.

You, sir, are the lodestar of cofveve...!

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I worked at Tivoli for a few months. It was a quirky place. Tony hogged all the good tables. Every Saturday night, 2 tour buses would pull up full of cranky old folks. I got yelled at once because I couldnt bring Sanka coffee fast enough. Decaf brewed coffee was always regular coffee mixed with hot water. Tivoli was opened by the original F&B team at the Watergate Hotel.

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On 11/22/2014 at 4:18 PM, DonRocks said:

Does anyone remember a pizza parlor in Burke called Les Trois Continents?

You're not going to believe who owned it - I stumbled across that randomly, and my jaw dropped.

Here is more history concerning General Loan, the man in one of the most powerful and impactful photos from the war in Vietnam and the owner of the restaurant.

The facts behind the execution change the story rather dramatically.

The executed Vietcong officer had just led the murders of many people that day.  He was caught.  The Geneva Convention accepts the immediate type of execution captured in the photo.   The photographer always regretted the impact on the South Vietnamese General’s life.  

Today’s Washington Post includes an editorial by George Will describing the lessons learned and unlearned from Vietnam.  One paragraph covers this event.

That photograph was and remains remarkable.  It was an incredible symbol of the “wrongs” of the war.

Nobody at that period knew the executed Vietcong was a vicious heartless murderer.

History and its lessons are always valuable

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1 hour ago, DaveO said:

That photograph was and remains remarkable. 

The timing of that photograph was perfect - after the trigger was pulled, but without much sign of carnage? Jeez.

There's a (graphic, but not gory) color video of the incident here (<--- appropriate warnings apply), which really shows how amazing the timing of that photograph was - it had to be taken at the precise millisecond. The video actually makes the incident look *less* cruel and violent.

(BTW, the article above says, "Lem's final expression is one of pain as the bullet rips through his head," but I suspect the sound of the gunshot and/or the force of impact caused the facial expression, more than any type of pain would have, as the brain has no pain receptors in it - moments of anxiety aside, that's about as easy a way to go as there is.)

Enjoy your meal.

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I'm curious what people's earliest ultra-luxe fine dining memories are. I'm not talking just about sit-down restaurants, or even great restaurants, but fine-dining, white-tablecloth experiences that left an impression on you.

My first might have been Harvey's - "The Restaurant of the Presidents" in downtown DC - I was about 20, and I was nervous as hell.

I can pretty much do my early memories by city:

Cincinatti: The Maisonette
San Francisco: Ernie's

(The above two restaurants were 5-star/5-diamond rated in Mobil/AAA - this is long, long before Michelin left France, and these were about the only national ranking services there were.)

New York City: The Russian Tea Room
Baltimore: Tio Pepe's

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2 hours ago, DonRocks said:

I'm curious what people's earliest ultra-luxe fine dining memories are. I'm not talking just about sit-down restaurants, or even great restaurants, but fine-dining, white-tablecloth experiences that left an impression on you.

My first might have been Harvey's - "The Restaurant of the Presidents" in downtown DC - I was about 20, and I was nervous as hell.

I can pretty much do my early memories by city:

Cincinatti: The Maisonette
San Francisco: Ernie's

(The above two restaurants were 5-star/5-diamond rated in Mobil/AAA - this is long, long before Michelin left France, and these were about the only national ranking services there were.)

New York City: The Russian Tea Room
Baltimore: Tio Pepe's
Bar Harbor: 

The Air Force landed me in the DC area in 1980, and my first fine dining experience here was Vincenzo's -- the Italian seafood restaurant in Adams Morgan. Maybe a notch below but quite excellent was New Orleans Emporium in Adams Morgan.

Growing up in Lancaster, PA, fine dining was scrapple WITH ketchup....but Haydn Zug's in East Petersburg was as good as it got.

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