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"Pink Slime" vs. "Lean, Finely Textured Beef" - A Triumph of Free Speech


DonRocks
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The major grocery chains are having their asses handed to them without a jot of government intervention, all because some genius grossed out the world with pictures of pink slime.

This is the way it should be.

(No pictures here, please - they're plentiful everywhere else, and they make me sick to look at (and I'm thinking of the one in particular that looks like soft-serve strawberry yogurt. eeeee-yuck. If you haven't seen it yet, don't go searching for it, trust me.))

Job well done, marketers, strategists, or whoever was responsible for inventing the term, taking the picture, and accusing the grocery store Fat Cats of being guilty by complacency.

Without a single tax dollar spent.

Beautiful.

Wal-Mart, Safeway, Kroeger ... all backed off this week. Where were they LAST week? Hmmm? They're not "do-gooders"; they're profiteers.

This is the kind of "shaking up the house" it takes to get things done correctly.

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The major grocery chains are having their asses handed to them without a jot of government intervention, all because some genius grossed out the world with pictures of pink slime.

...

Job well done, marketers, strategists, or whoever was responsible for inventing the term, taking the picture, and accusing the grocery store Fat Cats of being guilty by complacency.

Without a single tax dollar spent.

The term 'pink slime' was coined by Gerald Zirnstein in a USDA memo, and he and fellow USDA scientist Carl Custer warned against its use. They were overruled by higher ups and he later left the agency over it, but I think it's very much worth pointing out that the crusade against this was originated by employees of a US government agency funded by our tax dollars.

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The term 'pink slime' was coined by Gerald Zirnstein in a USDA memo, and he and fellow USDA scientist Carl Custer warned against its use. They were overruled by higher ups and he later left the agency over it, but I think it's very much worth pointing out that the crusade against this was originated by employees of a US government agency funded by our tax dollars.

And an excellent point it is, too. Thanks, Brian.

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Aweome story today by WaPo on this phenomenon. Everyone caught up in the buzz/hype on this story should check this out for another perspective.

When I read this today, my first thought about the manufacturers was "Boo Effing Hoo." They figured out a way to make cheap, fatty effluvia sorta palatable to stretch out ground meat "products" and sell it to the ignoratti. Now they are crying "Foul!" because they have been caught out. If 25% of a cow is involved in this mess, then maybe they ought to think about paying some trained butchers to do a little better, instead of the untrained folk they use and pay them peanuts. When did all this "useless" meat become a problem? When they started using non-union, untrained meat cutters, perhaps? There's a "side of the story" I'd really like to read.

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Isn't this just nose-to-tail eating? Cosentino or somebody should incorporate it into a themed tasting menu. :D

It really is lying.

Steamed processed meat heated to cow body temperature and dosed with amonia in amounts greater than their OWN safety testing, yielding meat that the USDA raised concerns due to pathogens, seems to strain credulity as ground beef, which is what it in the end labeled as in your kid's school lunch.

Just sayin' ya know.

I know, lets have Kobe FTLB sliders!

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When I read this today, my first thought about the manufacturers was "Boo Effing Hoo." They figured out a way to make cheap, fatty effluvia sorta palatable to stretch out ground meat "products" and sell it to the ignoratti. Now they are crying "Foul!" because they have been caught out. If 25% of a cow is involved in this mess, then maybe they ought to think about paying some trained butchers to do a little better, instead of the untrained folk they use and pay them peanuts. When did all this "useless" meat become a problem? When they started using non-union, untrained meat cutters, perhaps? There's a "side of the story" I'd really like to read.

The way I read it this other company found a way to use other slaughterhouses' scraps. The 'theys' are different companies. Theoretically, that means it is profitable for the slaughterhouses to waste 25% of the cow even if pink slime doesn't exist. So there is little economic incentive to hire a skilled butcher.

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