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Straw, Stick, and Brick Delicatessen (Formerly Three Little Pigs), Jason and Caroline Story's Homemade Charcuterie and Salumi by Chef Adam Goodison in Petworth - Closed Jul 31, 2017


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At the Silver Spring Market:

Chef at Market: Jason Story from Three Little Pigs, 11am - 12noon on Saturday, February 11.

From what I understand, this event has been rescheduled for some time in March.

I'm still curious to know when Story's store on GA is opening. Updates from the Prince of Petworth?

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You can get

leaf lard

and duck eggs

and venison sausage

and numerous pork belly preparations

and vanilla soda from scratch

and smoked, head on shrimp

Go. Soon. This prices aren't crazy. The neighborhood is fine. There is a lot of street parking and the place is next to a fire station. They use local products whenever possible. The next time you feel like going for a drive come check out this part of DC. Moroni Brothers is a few blocks south; make a kick ass eating day out of it. The owners are living the dream.

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I tried a variety of things from Three Little Pigs this weekend, including country pate, hot smoked maple bacon, and ventreche. The bacon was my favorite by far. Sold unsliced, we cut it thick and fried up a whole pound of it this morning for an extended family breakfast. It was a big hit. Meaty, salty and with a subtle sweetness imparted by the maple, this wasn't intense bacon but it was very satisfying.

The country pate is finely ground with no solid pieces of meat in it, the smooth texture broken only by little bits of onion. It has a not-unpleasant liver-y flavor to it.

This was my first experience with ventreche, which is cured pork belly, originally from Gascony apparently. I was expecting a melt in the mouth experience like with the best lardo, but the fat here (it's mostly fat) has more chew to it, though perhaps due to the thickness with which it was (laboriously, and by hand) sliced in the store. It had distinct herbal notes.

Nice store, with plenty of other things to try on my next visit.

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Stopped in today. I love places and people like this. Like Zora and others upthread, I really hope they make it too and think they're off to a good start from a business model perspective. Can Three Little Pigs go onto the Dining Guide? They sell lunch food now with more to follow. More on all that below.

Carolina and Jason are a young but experienced couple with real passion and focus around what they're doing.

VENUE

Their facebook page tells the construction and permitting story familiar to most of us. Originally expected in December, they finally cleared all the hoops in March. The space is minimalist but attractive; utilitarian but smart.

First, their theme of a chalkboard ties together the online and offline. It reinforces the handmade, craft, artisan nature of all the products and the creative, fun, multi-faceted philosophy that gives structure and soul to the business. It emphasizes the seasonal and daily changes driven by different farms' availability, weather and all the other factors. While the inventory won't be as predictable as a grocery store, it seems very likely to always be as carefully sourced as it is prepared. For the venue, in keeping with the chalk theme, all the meats in the refrigerated case sit on black slates. Menus over the back wall and case are chalkboards. Even their bright blue main entry door carries changing chalked messages each day.

Second, the spare nature of the space with plenty of light also supports focus, authenticity and simplicity, all qualities inherent in their approach. Entering from Georgia Ave, there's a decorative table at front along the window. The large open wood floor has a big carved line pig in it that you walk across to the case and counter. Original art figures prominently in the design. At right above a great, natural light wood 6 or 7 stool counter is a custom colorful pastel mural of...well, what else?...three pigs. There are photos capturing the mural's creation on the Facebook page.

Finally, the location right in Petworth is yet another peg in the board of an up and coming food neighborhood with Moroni, Qualia, Domku and today's WaPo Food Section cover story (Fish in the Hood) all nearby.

PRODUCT

Others have already posted the different things they've had on offer so I won't repeat that. I bought three things and sampled two so can comment on those:

- Maple Bacon. Carolina suggested this be used in cooking as a component of other dishes due to the sweetness imparted by the maple syrup in curing. So we did. And it made some pretty awesome BLTs.

- Breakfast Bacon. Evidently this is pretty popular in terms of the volume of requests they get. Haven't tried it yet but it looks great. And of course great that you can buy this, like anything, in block form or have it sliced however preferred.

- Polish Sausage. This long, narrow diameter dry sausage reminded me of some of the dry Italian sausages I've bought at Vace. Still need to track down some Stachowski sausages but haven't yet. Carolina gave me a sample of this in store and I bought one to take home. It's a very nicely seasoned and composed sausage. I have a lot to learn about sausages (future class I'm thinking) so lack the right vocabulary to describe this. Similar in flavor to better Italian dry sweet sausages but not as sweet and with some bite from black peppercorns and not sure what else. I could see it maybe pairing well with a variety of full, fruity wines and stronger hard cheeses.

- Tasso Ham. I had a sample of this but didn't take any home...this time. In the case, it looked like a big bundle of braided meat that might have been braised. But of course it hadn't been. It was a ham with just a moderate amount of fat. Really tasty and on my list for a future visit.

Some of the interesting things on display not referenced above include lightly pickled (so must be refrigerated) radishes and one other vegetable I'm forgetting (maybe carrot) along with four big trotters right there in the case. A wonderful looking pork liver pate was right in the center and also available as one of the day's three sandwiches. As with all the meats, these items will change regularly according to season and availability.

SERVICE

I wouldn't necessarily write about this for a store but a writeup about Three Little Pigs would be incomplete without it. Jason and Carolina are both CIA-trained chefs. But Jason has a deeper charcuterie background so the division of responsibilities has him downstairs doing all the curing, pickling and preparation. Carolina isn't just incredibly friendly and helpful; she actually studied hospitality as part of her CIA program. First and foremost, she really knows her stuff on product, farms and cooking. But, beyond that, she's incredibly nice and really goes above and beyond to help customers. The website gives many examples of this, ranging from them encouraging after-hours emails and custom requests to their active engagement with fans on Facebook and small group classes they're beginning to offer this month.

FUTURE PLANS

Pretty clearly, this is just the beginning and I was glad to hear about some of the plans since they'll need to broaden and diversify some to ensure enough revenue and profit to endure. The sandwiches and low-sugar, house made sodas are one move in that direction. Though charcuterie is the heart of the business, providing a few great lunch items each day will attract even more customers. Classes are yet another and with just a single monthly class currently mostly sold out through June, it's easy to imagine how this might grow. Topics like "Spring Chickens," "Fresh Sausages" and "BBQ Basics" currently occupy the schedule into summer. Carolina also shared their plans to sell dry aged beef. Right now, they only have beef jerky and I think this is about finding the right source. They're serious about their relationships with the right local farms with just a few current relationships including Evensong and Polyface. Finally, I mentioned Qualia to Carolina since Joel & Co are just down Georgia about a mile from TLP. Carolina mentioned an interest in selling a local quality coffee. Joel, are you reading other threads? ;)

BOTTOM LINE

Count me as a fan. Like Zora and others, I really hope they make it. From a business perspective, I think they are off to a great start. Carolina's roots here in DC ensured a ready, built in base of support. Their intelligence about growth augurs good things. And, most of all, their clear passion and obsessive commitment to product and service excellence is the foundation upon which a great business can grow.

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I mentioned Qualia to Carolina since Joel & Co are just down Georgia about a mile from TLP. Carolina mentioned an interest in selling a local quality coffee. Joel, are you reading other threads? ;)

The thought has crossed my mind, although I generally eschew a retail relationship, where I can't guarantee the coffee won't sit on the shelf more than three days. However, 3LP is about a mile up the street from the shop, but just blocks from my house, so might be manageable.

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- Breakfast Bacon. Evidently this is pretty popular in terms of the volume of requests they get. Haven't tried it yet but it looks great. And of course great that you can buy this, like anything, in block form or have it sliced however preferred.

- Polish Sausage. This long, narrow diameter dry sausage reminded me of some of the dry Italian sausages I've bought at Vace. Still need to track down some Stachowski sausages but haven't yet. Carolina gave me a sample of this in store and I bought one to take home. It's a very nicely seasoned and composed sausage. I have a lot to learn about sausages (future class I'm thinking) so lack the right vocabulary to describe this. Similar in flavor to better Italian dry sweet sausages but not as sweet and with some bite from black peppercorns and not sure what else. I could see it maybe pairing well with a variety of full, fruity wines and stronger hard cheeses.

Just an update on the two items above now with more experience. The breakfast bacon didn't work as well for us as the maple bacon, which we liked. One of the issues with the breakfast bacon was that the fat percentage was especially high creating a lot of grease in the pan. Leaving it in leads to a deep-fried and not-so-great outcome. Draining it as it cooks led to better texture and flavor but very reduced bits of bacon. Will ask them about this but, based on this one experience, we prefer several others incuding the basic "Wellshire" sold at Whole Foods.

The polish sausage was good but, after using it for a few days, I think just a matter of personal preference for a somewhat sweeter sausage.

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I loved their smoked kielbasa--liked it better than Jamie Stachowski's, which is more garlicky and fattier than 3LP's version. If you want to try any of Jamie's sausages, the closest place for you is to see him (or someone else selling his stuff) at the Palisades Farmers Market on Sunday morning--on the little street that runs between the Safeway and MacArthur Beverages.

The best bacon I have tasted in years is the one that Bev Eggleston sells at Dupont on Sunday--Bev's pork belly cured and smoked by Alan Benton. Get the thin-sliced if it's there, otherwise the thick sliced.

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Loving their maple bacon. Personal taste, I know, but I think this sweeter style compliments the taste of the pork better than some of the super smokey ones. They also had a really nice olive assortment yesterday, served with bits of thinly sliced orange rind. Second visit in a row, though, that I walked away disappointed they didn't have the Chinese sausage (call in advance if there's something on the online menu you really want).

I really hope they develop some relationships with other retailers around the city. But maybe that's already the plan.

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Finally got up the street to Three Little Pigs yesterday.

We got some pate, and with a stop at La Caprice DC over on 14th St for a wonderful baguette, had delicious pate sandwiches. (baguette, mustard, pate).

We also tasted the ham off the leg in what I think of as "that Spanish bar contraption" and really enjoyed it. Also got a nice Alsatian (I think) style sausage, but haven't eaten it yet.

This will become a regular stop on the food shopping circuit.

Is the Chinese sausage the 'ndj something or other? My friend got that, and it looked about to run out.

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Was in again a few days ago and wanted to share some thoughts on new things tried. They really seem to be changing the mix very regularly; an approach I love though of course means finding something you really like might mean certain heartbreak...except knowing these guys they'd probably move heaven and earth to bring it back if customers told them :)

The few new things tried:

- Italian Country Bacon: bacon is probably the best example of a charcuterie category with virtually unlimited versions through which 3LP can cycle. This one was my second favorite of the three I've tried so far but with an asterisk. The asterisk has to do wtih the breakfast bacon we didn't so much like but I'm now convinced that it was due to too high a fat to meat ratio. I had a great and very instructive (to me) talk with Jason about this and he encouraged me to specify which cut from a block I'd prefer when ordering. That hadn't occurred to me because I wouldn't have thought so cool to ask them to cut apart a block looking for the part with higher meat-to-fat. Nevertheless, Jason did just that in front of me with this bacon. The part I took was great on the ratio dimension. Good fat but not overwhelming as was the case with the breakfast bacon. 2nd to the maple bacon only from a personal preference on seasoning/curing standpoint. This one is a bit peppery but very good.

- Argentinian Chorizo: Very interesting and not really anything like the spicier types of chorizo one might find in a paella. This is a relatively mild, quarter-sized diameter sausage. We liked it quite a bit. It's cooked as purchased but of course can be used in cooking and heated.

- Saucisson d'Alsace: Best sausage yet had at 3LP. This is a sweeter, dark red, highly marbled dry sausage. Great flavor. As I guessed, we liked this much better than the Polish dry sausage we'd purchased last week.

Loving their maple bacon. Personal taste, I know, but I think this sweeter style compliments the taste of the pork better than some of the super smokey ones. They also had a really nice olive assortment yesterday, served with bits of thinly sliced orange rind.

Big agreement on both points above. And, you beat me to it on the olives. We took some of those home a few days ago also. Really good. Maybe the most loved thing in our house yet from 3LP.

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A selection of coffee beans will be available for sale at 3 Little Pigs starting this weekend.

Joel

Excellent! Next I hope some farmers markets execs discover 3LP, the Qualia beans there and reconsider their thinking about what to allow into the markets. You never know.

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Actually, I believe 3LP is already in touch with FreshFarms and expects to be selling at one or more of their markets.

I went down to Dupont Circle last Sunday to hand our free samples. One of the market managers stopped by to chat and take several samples. While I remain skeptical that they will change their tune any time soon, I feel like maybe there has been some progress in breaking through their resistance a little.

Joel

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I stopped in here for the first time yesterday, and walked out impressed. Two sandwiches to go: a pork rillettes/celery/apple/roquefort on a nice country white/boule, and pulled pork/red cabbage slaw on a jalapeno roll. Both were great, and appeared to be the work of someone who really knows how to make sandwiches; good balance between bread and fillings, consideration of the right type of bread, and obviously high-quality ingredients.

In addition to the sandwiches, I picked up a slab of pancetta and some maple bacon, but could have easily picked up 12 other things--jerky, salami, duck fat, confit, snack sausages...I'll be back.

http://www.threelittlepigsdc.com/

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I stopped in here for the first time yesterday, and walked out impressed. Two sandwiches to go: a pork rillettes/celery/apple/roquefort on a nice country white/boule, and pulled pork/red cabbage slaw on a jalapeno roll. Both were great, and appeared to be the work of someone who really knows how to make sandwiches; good balance between bread and fillings, consideration of the right type of bread, and obviously high-quality ingredients.

In addition to the sandwiches, I picked up a slab of pancetta and some maple bacon, but could have easily picked up 12 other things--jerky, salami, duck fat, confit, snack sausages...I'll be back.

http://www.threelittlepigsdc.com/

I was there about a month ago and had a roasted pork sandwich that was much less than the sum of its parts. And, like everything else there, it was dramatically overpriced -- $10 or $11, as I recall. This place seems like a great concept, and the pork products sure *looked* good. But it is designed for a decidedly upper-class clientele of pig consumers, which is a bit odd considering the location -- unlike, say, Fish in the Hood, RAS, Moroni and Qualia, I doubt very much they are hoping for much business from the neighborhood itself.

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I was there about a month ago and had a roasted pork sandwich that was much less than the sum of its parts. And, like everything else there, it was dramatically overpriced -- $10 or $11, as I recall. This place seems like a great concept, and the pork products sure *looked* good. But it is designed for a decidedly upper-class clientele of pig consumers, which is a bit odd considering the location -- unlike, say, Fish in the Hood, RAS, Moroni and Qualia, I doubt very much they are hoping for much business from the neighborhood itself.

When you're evaluating cost, please take into consideration what you're paying for.

First, there's the fact that this is a new, first business run by two recent graduates of the Culinary Institute of America who are still in their twenties. Their expertise lies in advanced culinary education, though as recent stories in WaPo publications indicate, Jason Story did not learn much about charcuterie in school even if he has put in time with name experts in the field (cf. byline on what is usually called Michael Ruhlman's book on the subject).

Second, he pays more for animals raised on small local farms, grass-fed, hormone-free, not sent off to feed lots, etc. This is a pricey thing to do, something that not every wonderful local maker of fabulous charcuterie makes a point of doing whether for reasons of cost, ability to meet demand or other factors. Nor something, say, Fish in the Hood may care about, though I don't know that for a fact having not done my research before posting.

Finally, you're talking my hood. We've got third-generation natives living in the house their grandparents bought and newly transplanted Harvard J.D's; Ph.Ds, B.S.s, A.D.s, M.F.As, MSWs and GEDs; housepainters who discuss international politics with smart, informed fervor on the back of the bus; cops; teachers; musicians; prostitutes; shop keepers; construction workers; drug dealers; frugal, home-owning, retired ladies and their alcoholic relatives from afar; community activists; liquor-store clerks; high-class government employees with snazzy shoes hand-sewn by Daniel Day-Lewis...

The mixed demographics of a changing neighborhood inculcate mixed businesses. If Manhattan has Brooklyn, why can't D.C. foster a nifty corridor of young, food-oriented businesses run with passion, skill and hard work, too? And in the words of Spike Lee, why can't we just get along (and dance)?

Somewhere in between Alice Waters' belief that folk who pay mega-bucks for the latest Nike ought to sponsor their own organic peach tree and the lament of donrockweilers over the price of the food that is the object of their cult, there has to be a sensible middle ground.

********************************

Here's a link to the established topic about this new place in the Shopping & Cooking forum, though thanks for mentioning the sandwiches. I really enjoyed the pulled-pork, especially given the nobby bits of cooked vegetables in the eggy bun, though, I did wish the meat had been heated up again. I've also tried the jerky. Disclaimer: I was present when a farmer made a delivery and got to tag along during a guided tour of the premises where a slab of her pig was being transformed into yummy things, so I am more than a wee bit biased.

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Wow - AB - this is the first uber-super-passionate post I recall from you! Sound points - I am looking forward to trying TLP soon.

(Ease a little on the lil' ventworm, though, wee?)

@MartyL -- how big was the sandwich? Did you feel like it was worth the $10-11??

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I was there about a month ago and had a roasted pork sandwich that was much less than the sum of its parts. And, like everything else there, it was dramatically overpriced -- $10 or $11, as I recall.

@MartyL -- how big was the sandwich? Did you feel like it was worth the $10-11??

Everybody's experience will vary, but I found the sandwiches to be nicely sized--certainly a good lunch sandwich, and with my fairly large appetite I found them to be filling. Regarding the pricing--absolutely, $10-11 is at the high end of what I would comfortably pay for a sandwich, but I walked away satisfied with the quality.

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You're talking my hood. We've got third-generation natives living in the house their grandparents bought and newly transplanted Harvard J.D's; Ph.Ds, B.S.s, A.D.s, M.F.As, MSWs and GEDs; housepainters who discuss international politics with smart, informed fervor on the back of the bus; cops; teachers; musicians; prostitutes; shop keepers; construction workers; drug dealers; frugal, home-owning, retired ladies and their alcoholic relatives from afar; community activists; liquor-store clerks; high-class government employees with snazzy shoes hand-sewn by Daniel Day-Lewis...

The mixed demographics of a changing neighborhood inculcate mixed businesses. If Manhattan has Brooklyn, why can't D.C. foster a nifty corridor of young, food-oriented businesses run with passion, skill and hard work, too? And in the words of Spike Lee, why can't we just get along (and dance)?

Somewhere in between Alice Waters' belief that folk who pay mega-bucks for the latest Nike ought to sponsor their own organic peach tree and the lament of donrockweilers over the price of the food that is the object of their cult, there has to be a sensible middle ground.

Whoa! Nothing I wrote calls any of this into question. I, too, yearn for "a nifty corridor of young, food-oriented businesses run with passion, skill and hard work." And Georgia Avenue offers such an opportunity -- the prospect is very encouraging. I wrote nothing to suggest that Petworth and environs aren't just as diverse, and exciting, and vibrant, and as impossible to pigeon-hole, as Anna suggests. Nor do I begrudge artisans such as Jason Story their perfectionism and obsession with quality and civic-mindedness. To the contrary -- I deeply admire it. And I assume his profit margins are just as low as most other purveyors of high-quality products.

My point was simply that I can't see how very many of those "third-generation natives living in the house their grandparents bought and newly transplanted Harvard J.D's; Ph.Ds, B.S.s, A.D.s, M.F.As, MSWs and GEDs; housepainters who discuss international politics with smart, informed fervor on the back of the bus; cops; teachers; musicians; prostitutes; shop keepers; construction workers; drug dealers; frugal, home-owning, retired ladies and their alcoholic relatives from afar; community activists; and liquor-store clerks" can possibly afford to pay such prices for their pork -- not on a regular basis, anyway. (Can't speak for the "high-class government employees with snazzy shoes hand-sewn by Daniel Day-Lewis" ... since I've never known any!)

I was positively giddy at the prospect of being able to find superlative guanciale and other delicacies. And I'm sure I'll do so at Three Little Pigs on occasion, and with great pleasure. But when I was there, the prices were far, far higher than even the wonderful products sold by Red Apron at Dupont and other markets. (I seem to recall $24/lb. for guanciale, for instance, but my memory is hazy, so don't quote me on that.) If that's sustainable, more power to 'em. But I worry.

As for my sandwich, it was average in size and taste. Not nearly as good, for instance, as the $8 sandwiches at Cork, and the $3.50 bahn mi at Banh Mi D.C., just to name my two most recent sandwiches. But that roasted pork was only one data point -- I wouldn't assume it was representative, and I will be back to TLP to try others.

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Whoa!...My point was simply that I can't see how very many...can possibly afford to pay such prices for their pork -- not on a regular basis, anyway.

Okay. As you recognize, the choice of the location has more to do with the kind of real estate business owners in their late 20s can afford in this city as opposed to consumer research identifying and targeting demographics and evaluating convenience. However, I am not the only Petworth resident who finds the business more appealing than others I pass on a daily basis on my way to the places in the city where I work, play and do most of my shopping. It's too challenging to elaborate much further given rules of online etiquette and constraints on time. Suffice to say Palena sits comfortably in its surroundings in Cleveland Park and Michael Landrum boldly goes where other restaurateurs have yet to venture forth, but with steak and hamburgers vs. fennel pollen foam that bursts from within a foie gras gum ball. You can more easily coax a whole lot of farmers, producers and merchants to congregate on a weekly basis outdoors in downtown Bethesda than in Ward 8. What pleases me most, I think, is not the secure sign of this area's gentrification, but that at least for now, you get a bit of this next to a bit of that. It's not all This This This This and More of This, food- and otherwise.

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Business models aside, I was able to pop in this past weekend to the shop and grab a pound of halfsmokes and a good sized chunk of spanish chorizo. The halfsmokes plumped up fantastically on the grill and had a wonderful snap and spice to them. I didn't hear any complaints from the crowd. Selfishly I kept the chorizo for myself. It's red and lusty, and the cubes of fat give it great unctuousness. It made for a delicious late night snack with some leftover cheese from the party.

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Three Little PIgs is ensconced at the Dupont Market, next to Q street and the empanada stand. A couple of weeks ago, I picked up a Saucisson Sec aux Herbes, and picked up another one today since I was almost out, and also a small Breakfast Sausage. It's definitely a splurge, but so far a worthy one.

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Three Little Pigs has expanded their offerings a bit since the last time I was there.  They now have a handful of products from Zingerman's (coffee cakes, honey, crackers) as well as steaks from Cropp Family Farms in Damascus, Maryland. A fun little store to browse on a rainy/snowy weekend morning. 

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I brought a nice length of saucisson sec to a cheese party this weekend, and it was a huge hit. I do really like a lot of their other offerings, but for me the saucisson sec is just amazingly addictive. Also finally found a bacon that Nick adores; of course, it was a slab of breakfast bacon from Three Little Pigs (pork belly cured with kosher salt, black pepper, maple syrup, and hot smoked over maple wood). <3

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Their summer sausage is my favorite. And the smoked pork sandwich is good too.

And while I live in Petworth, I am most likely to buy from them at the Columbia Heights farm market, since I am there most weeks. Very convenient.

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The name of the business has been changed to Straw Stick and Brick Deli. Or I'll blow your house down. The same couple own and operate it. My understanding is that this name change was due to legal pressure from Le Trois Petits Cochons, a commercial charcuterie manufacturer in the New York metropolitan area.

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They say the hams were "started" in June 2012. So I assume that 2.5 years is nearly all curing time.

This is right. Inspired by your post, made it in and bought some. It's pretty pricey but...wow. Sliced thin, this can easily pass for a very high quality prosciutto. We paired it with some good manchego, almonds, honey, dried cherries and BreadFurst baguette toast points. Really, really good.

BTW, also learned they'll be at 5 farmers markets this spring including DuPont.

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Tried this for the first time in between picking up kids from school and returning for an evening event as it was pretty convenient to get to. This is definitely going to be a part of our regular rotation. First, we've been pretty regular at Urban Butcher, which is just a few blocks from where we live. This is not too much further the other way down GA Ave., though not walking distance. The biggest drawback for SSB is lack of liquor license, though I'm not that big a drinker so definitely not a major deficiency.

First, the $16 meat board is an amazing deal, especially when compared to what you get at UB for their butcher board for over twice the price. Best was clearly the duck prosciutto. The salami was quickly gobbled up by my son as he proclaimed it his new favorite restaurant.

The brisket sandwich was also a hit with a nice sauce that was not overpowering and let the meat still show through. We also got the "meat cone" just because the kids like the idea of getting a cone of meat, kind of like an ice cream cone. Comparitively speaking, not as good a deal as the butcher board, but it did have some pate in it which was important to my son.

The lack of alcohol was made up for with the house made lemonade soda. Just wish this had set up in one of the storefronts a little further up GA Ave instead of where it is.

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Our son's favorite restaurant now, over Urban Butcher, chose to go here for his birthday dinner last month and again last night to celebrate his first concert performance in the DC youth orchestra. I cannot reiterate enough how great a deal the meat board here is for $16. Ours came with generous servings of fennel salami, andouille sausage, bresaola, pate, and a huge chunk of bleu cheese. 

They were out of brisket which forced me to venture outside my ordering comfort zone and try the philly cheese steak, which while definitely not going to win as an authentic philly cheese, which I was not expecting, it is definitely a delicious sandwich with good quality beef and a nice blend of onions and peppers and melted cheese to hold it all together on toasted bread.

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Announced today on their Facebook page that they will be closing July 31. Went there for dinner as this is our son's favorite restaurant, along with Urban Butcher. We're basically right in between the two, but this has always been the more economical of the two with slightly lower prices, and no alcohol served to add to the bill. Going to be missed.

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This makes me very sad, but also feels somewhat inevitable.  I think they have the best overall charcuterie program in DC.  But charcuterie is a very labor intensive business on the retail side and it seems like they never quite made the dine-in aspect click.  I hope the talented people behind SSB will quickly land on their feet and start making delicious cured meat products elsewhere.

It's hard for me to imagine a place less economical than Urban Butcher.  Their success as an ongoing business concern always surprises me.  Have you tried Red Apron / B side for dine in?  The vibe is a little different but child friendly and much cheaper than Urban Butcher, and I think the food is better than UB.

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On 7/22/2017 at 10:10 PM, dinoue said:

Announced today on their Facebook page that they will be closing July 31. Went there for dinner as this is our son's favorite restaurant, along with Urban Butcher. We're basically right in between the two, but this has always been the more economical of the two with slightly lower prices, and no alcohol served to add to the bill. Going to be missed.

So bummed by this news.  With the caveat that my comparison set is basically Red Apron and Stachowski's, I think that SS&B has offered the best charcuterie in the city for several years now.  Really sad to see them go.

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On 7/25/2017 at 0:41 PM, squidsdc said:

I hope they will be at the Farmers Market this Thursday, as they have been, so I can get one last taste. Never was able to make it out to the retail location.

...and I got the very LAST pulled pork sammie.  Not sure what they have at the store, but sold out at the market. Bought a supply of some smoked meats as well. It's not too often one can find a good smoked meat with no garlic or soy. :mellow:

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