Jump to content

My pizza stone broke . . . again


Recommended Posts

They never last - seem to be unable to sustain high temps without breaking. Grrrr.

Does your pizza stone break too? What am I doing wrong? I store it in the oven - maybe that's wrong (read that somewhere).

Or maybe I've been buying the wrong ones.

Please advise. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only main advice I've ever heard about pizza stones is to never wash them as the water could soak in and then expand on the next heating. Leaving it in should be just fine and probably makes the oven more efficient (when heated, less efficient heating it up).

I suppose you could try a different stone. Maybe granite or soapstone? I've always wanted to buy some of those Himalayan salt plates and use them as a baking stone. You know...for science.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I had a pizza stone I stored it in the oven without any problems. Mine busted when I used it on the grill. Since then I switched to using unglazed quarry tiles, which I got at Home Depot based on mdt's suggestion. None have broken yet, they were dirt-cheap, and I have many back-ups in case I need them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I had a pizza stone I stored it in the oven without any problems. Mine busted when I used it on the grill. Since then I switched to using unglazed quarry tiles, which I got at Home Depot based on mdt's suggestion. None have broken yet, they were dirt-cheap, and I have many back-ups in case I need them.

That's funny you should say that, Amazon comments are to be regarded with a grain of salt, but I was reading reviews on my link above and came across a few that referred to unglazed quarry tiles from an Alton Brown episode of Good Eats. Some said that they may contain lead, and that he referred to only using them on the bottom of the oven to retain heat in the oven, not neccessarily contacting the food, since they aren't food grade. If they did contain lead, I don't think I would personally be using them for either.

Some post say the lead is in the glaze, but even so, some research might be in order.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anything under a half-inch width is destined for inevitable breakage. Aim for the thicker, minimum 3/4-inch width, keep it in the stove at all times, don't wash, and revel in the long life and outstanding benefits. To echo the posts above, unglazed quarry tiles are indeed a boon, both in price and longevity. Procure one at your local mom-n-pop shop, not the Home Depots of the world, they will be in much better touch with their suppliers and materials. For such an important and lasting piece, it's worth it to call around or drive around and check out options.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had mine about 15 years, washed it, left it in the oven, stored it, washed it again soaking it with water, sent it through an oven cleaning cycle once, then again more recently in the hopes of destroying any gluten residue, washed it again, etc. Mine is fire brick in a slab about 3/4" thick. Indestructible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I broke one and then got the Williams Sonoma 1/2" version. At the time someone told me it came with a lifetime guarantee. I don't know if that's true, because fortunately I've never needed to find out.

I used to keep it in the oven but but my better half is convinced it screws up temps for baking other things (I maintain that having a pizza stone on the bottom of a gas oven could only help even out temps).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I broke one and then got the Williams Sonoma 1/2" version. At the time someone told me it came with a lifetime guarantee. I don't know if that's true, because fortunately I've never needed to find out.

I used to keep it in the oven but but my better half is convinced it screws up temps for baking other things (I maintain that having a pizza stone on the bottom of a gas oven could only help even out temps).

It will only help even out oven temps if you let the oven warm up and stay at temp for at least 45 minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I take mine out of the oven in the warmer months so I can keep the kitchen from getting quite so warm from the extra running time. My stone is probably 15 years old now, a Pampered Chef product, that is at least 3/4" thick, maybe a little more,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anything under a half-inch width is destined for inevitable breakage. Aim for the thicker, minimum 3/4-inch width, keep it in the stove at all times, don't wash, and revel in the long life and outstanding benefits. To echo the posts above, unglazed quarry tiles are indeed a boon, both in price and longevity. Procure one at your local mom-n-pop shop, not the Home Depots of the world, they will be in much better touch with their suppliers and materials. For such an important and lasting piece, it's worth it to call around or drive around and check out options.

The problem I have is that I'm not supposed to keep the pizza stone in my oven, since having it there affects the heating properties of said oven. The stone came from the manufacturer with the oven.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...