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New Orleans Po Boy Shop - Owners Cam McNair and Justin Snyder in South Dupont - Closed Dec 20, 2013


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http://www.nola.com/..._entry_dnp.html is the benchmark they should aspire to.

It's NOT all about the bread. Fried oysters it's about the grease, roast beef is gravy and the roast itself as well as how thick it's handsliced... Please don't say it's all about the bread. That's just the start. This is a quote from that which I linked above:

If we can agree that gravy is not a substance separate from beef, but a liquid expression of why we so covet the flesh of the cow, we can then argue that R & O’s roast beef po-boy is not just filled with beef; it’s painted with it. You can see it staining the edges of the bread, both halves of which are introduced to beef before being placed in the oven.

The top half gets dipped in gravy, the bottom half layered with gravy-soaked beef that comes as close in flavor to true debris as any I’ve tried. The dry heat does something for the seeded bread — call it Crisping for Battle — but even more for the beef. It is as if the meat has been plugged into Spinal Tap’s amplifier, turning the volume on its beefiness up to 11."

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It's NOT all about the bread. Fried oysters it's about the grease, roast beef is gravy and the roast itself as well as how thick it's handsliced... Please don't say it's all about the bread. That's just the start.

Yes and no. It is all about the bread from the standpoint of identifying the sandwich as a po-boy rather than some other long sandwich, and I think that is their point in using the tagline. Crisp, slightly crumbly crust, very airy, soft internal texture that soaks up gravy and mynez without diminishing their contributions, with fresh, wheaten flavor.

The best po-boy shops in NOLA get 2-3 Leidenheimer deliveries a day. Day-old Leidenheimer (which can be shipped on a wholesale contract; I think Acadiana gets it) is good-but-not-great. I wonder if they have found another way...?

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It's NOT all about the bread.

Perhaps not, but without the bread, it ain't worth it.

Ya need all the parts for it to work! You don't want to build your po' boy and have 14 screws and an allen wrench left unused in the bottom of the box!

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Hope they get the bread right, but also hope they get the frying right, as well as the roast. To me it's never been primarily the bread alone that distinguishes a poboy from any other long sandwich. Never saw a sub or hoagie or grinder or any other long sandwich originating in the US come with fried oysters, shrimp, catfish, or crawfish, or the kind of roast and gravy Joe H was talking about, dressed with shredded cabbage rather than lettuce. It's also about the other ingredients being done well.

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Never saw a sub or hoagie or grinder or any other long sandwich originating in the US come with fried oysters, shrimp, catfish, or crawfish, or the kind of roast and gravy Joe H was talking about, dressed with shredded cabbage rather than lettuce. It's also about the other ingredients being done well.

Ah yes, but ham and swiss on the correct style of bread is also a po'boy. And I believe french-fry and gravy sandwiches have a worldwide following...and that was one of the ORIGINAL po'boys.

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http://www.nola.com/..._entry_dnp.html is the benchmark they should aspire to.

I was taken to Mahoney's just this past weekend, and the bread was fantastic. It really made the sandwich for me. Also, corn meal fried shrimp was something I have never experienced before, interesting texture and delicious. The cochon we had was a bit dry but the flavor was really nice w/ cole slaw and hot sauce. I am really kicking myself for only trying 3 po boys in the 3.5 days we were in NO.

Anyhow, if the bread was not as great as it was, the cochon would have been more disappointing.

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I think y'all are putting more effort into describing the essence of a po-boy than the owners put into coming up with a name for their establishment.

Undoubtedly true. But after seeing (and surviving) a kajillion fried oyster/shrimp sandwiches (many of them quite delicious) on chewy, fancypants, often thick, sourdough bread, all of which were called "po boys" on menus, a little recognition for a shop that at least proffers a more "real" po-boy experience is the least we can do, on a food board.

Of course, we shall see.

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Ah yes, but ham and swiss on the correct style of bread is also a po'boy. And I believe french-fry and gravy sandwiches have a worldwide following...and that was one of the ORIGINAL po'boys.

Having grown up in New Orleans, I can assure you that ham and cheese (always swiss) is perhaps the most popular cold poboy on most menus. French fry poboys used to be an "affordable" option, offered for less than a dollar when I was a kid. It wasn't hip or trendy, or the "vegetarian" option. It was delicious and cheap. You can often find smoked sausage on a poboy. And on Fridays, when money was tight or my mom didn't want to fry seafood, we had the dreaded tuna salad poboys. The common element was the bread.

While I love fried seafood poboys, there's nothing like a roast beef poboy, with a little gravy and some mayo, shredded iceberg lettuce and pickles. Delicious. When I was in high school we used to cut school to go to a corner poboy shack for roast beef poboys.

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I just hope that the owners of this upcoming shop-who claim to be enthusiasts-know that there is an expectation for a superior po boy here. It's not enough to be on good bread. It must be outstanding by NOLA standards-not D. C.

Did I mention that our current standard was the chef de cuisine at the Windsor Court in the early '90's? Jeff Tunks has set a high bar.

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I just hope that the owners of this upcoming shop-who claim to be enthusiasts-know that there is an expectation for a superior po boy here. It's not enough to be on good bread. It must be outstanding by NOLA standards-not D. C.

Did I mention that our current standard was the chef de cuisine at the Windsor Court in the early '90's? Jeff Tunks has set a high bar.

We hit the Parkway Bakery for po-boys on our visit to NOLA last year. Dat was some good eatin'. Joe is correct -- if this place doesn't turn out a great po-boy, people won't come back.

I rarely eat barbecue here because I've had great barbecue and there is little to no great barbecue in DC.

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We hit the Parkway Bakery for po-boys on our visit to NOLA last year. Dat was some good eatin'. Joe is correct -- if this place doesn't turn out a great po-boy, people won't come back.

I rarely eat barbecue here because I've had great barbecue and there is little to no great barbecue in DC.

But how many people in DC know what a great po-boy is? If this place doesn't reach NOLA's standards for a great po-boy but offers a large stuffed sandwich at a decent price, which may still be a tasty sandwich if not a po-boy, then people will come back. After all, there are plenty of mediocre bbq joints in the DC area that thrive.

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But how many people in DC know what a great po-boy is? If this place doesn't reach NOLA's standards for a great po-boy but offers a large stuffed sandwich at a decent price, which may still be a tasty sandwich if not a po-boy, then people will come back. After all, there are plenty of mediocre bbq joints in the DC area that thrive.

Yup...I certainly don't know....never eaten one in NO. I've enjoyed the po-boys at Louisiana Kitchen in Bethesda, was completely underwhelmed by the one at Johnny's Half Shell...and that's about it. So hopefully one of you knowledgeable folks will come down to test the authenticity while I can give the ignorant opinion. :)

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Undoubtedly true. But after seeing (and surviving) a kajillion fried oyster/shrimp sandwiches (many of them quite delicious) on chewy, fancypants, often thick, sourdough bread, all of which were called "po boys" on menus, a little recognition for a shop that at least proffers a more "real" po-boy experience is the least we can do, on a food board.

Of course, we shall see.

Hell, I've been served a 'shrimp po boy' in an establishment that shall go unnamed on brioche - that was my get a rope moment. The level of variety on the NOPBS menu leaves me with tempered expectations right out the gate. To do all those things well would be damn impressive even in NOLA, and their location will likely have them doing high volume.

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Hell, I've been served a 'shrimp po boy' in an establishment that shall go unnamed on brioche - that was my get a rope moment. The level of variety on the NOPBS menu leaves me with tempered expectations right out the gate. To do all those things well would be damn impressive even in NOLA, and their location will likely have them doing high volume.

I dunno, the sandwich menu doesn't look too massive to me. Most of the great po-boy shops offer a huge variety of sandwiches, and none of them do all equally well. E.g., some are known for their roast beef, others for their fried seafood. I actually had a caprese po-boy at Parkway! (In addition to the incredible fried shrimp and the tasty but disintegrating roast beef). I could do without the "Carolina BBQ" and "Roast turkey and brie" po-boys. Time will tell which ones this place does best, but I plan to give the andouille sausage a try. I also will hold out hope that they can do a good muffaletta.

I was also pleased to see the proprietor mentions the late chef Tom Cowman. Chef Cowman before his untimely death ran the kitchen at the beloved Upperline, one of the best restaurants in NOLA.

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I always though that chef Tom Cowman did a much better job at Johnathan's than he did at Upperline.

Jsenter, thank you for your post. Perception and experience that hallmarks this board. I should also mention Dayton/Centerville, Ohio's Anne Kearney who did a helluva job at Peristyle and needs a bit of national recognition for her return to form back "home."

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Maybe it's just me, but more and more it seems like people are proffering their opinions about a place before they've actually experienced it, or in this case it's even opened its doors. Why not wait until you try the food to judge it or have a great debate about it? Maybe I'm just being overly sensitive tonight.

In any event, I'm excited to potentially have a place to get authentic po' boys in this city, something we're completely lacking. The resumes of the owners certainly read like they know authentic po' boys so I am hoping they pull it off. And I hope that once they have a good business going, they'll consider opening on the weekends for those of us who don't live in the city.

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^ but how can it possibly be delicious if it isn't authentic?

It can be. The fried oyster sandwich at the Passenger is delicious. The fried shrimp sandwich on the bar menu at Trummer's On Main is ridiculously delicious, a sick-good value, and, on more than one occasion, an excuse for me to detour on my way home after a late night at the office. But they are called po-boys. And they are not po-boys. And when a place makes a proffer of "authenticity" ("It's all about the bread" is as close to a po-boy stake-in-the-ground as you can make), there's not point in not holding them to it (and educating those who ask, about what "authenticity" means in this context).

I hope it's delicious, too. If it is, I'll keep going. And if the bread doesn't hold up to scrutiny, I'll say that too. Both can happen at the same time.

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Did someone say muffuletta? Best we ever had was in N.O. near the French Market. I think the place was called Central Grocery. Would love it if this place was as good.

Likely was Central Grocery. If it's been several years, it could have been Progress Grocery a few doors down. Progress no longer has a retail operation. They served a great muff. Last year when we visited NOLA we got muffs on the way to the airport at Nor-Jo out in Old Metairie. Very good!

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I was also pleased to see the proprietor mentions the late chef Tom Cowman. Chef Cowman before his untimely death ran the kitchen at the beloved Upperline, one of the best restaurants in NOLA.

Had the priviledge of eating there once, several years ago, agree totally that it was fantastic.

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Before everyone gets so excited about this unopen restaurant, would you please, please try The Bayou in West End? I've been there twice, and am batting two-for-two - try a shrimp po-boy with collard greens and baked beans. I'd like to know what you think because I think you're going to be pretty darned impressed.

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Now we know where the bread comes from:

The hunt for the perfect bread ended with Gambino’s Bakery in New Orleans, a lesser-known institution than Leidenheimer that Snyder believes works best for their purposes.

http://www.washingto...po-boy-shop.php

I missed that they would offer chicory coffee and beignets in the morning as well. Since I don't live anywhere near Dupont, I may need to have coffee and beignets, head to the farmers market to shop, then go back for a po' boy so I can get the full sampling. :)
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Now we know where the bread comes from:

The hunt for the perfect bread ended with Gambino’s Bakery in New Orleans, a lesser-known institution than Leidenheimer that Snyder believes works best for their purposes.

http://www.washingto...po-boy-shop.php

I do not think that Gambino's is lesser known that Leidenheimer, at least in New Orleans. And if they are getting thier bread from Gambino's can they smuggle up a few Doberge cakes in the shipments? :-)

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ok... licenses, permits, prep, all done. Come on by today from 3 to 4 for samples of our beignets, and we will open tomorrow at 7 am, and be open monday thru friday 7 to 7 from then on... hope to see you soon.

I hesitate to post this as I don't want them to run out of beignets before I can get there!

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Well, the good thing about having a slow week and working in the area meant I could scoot over and try the beignets. The bad thing being that I did not need to consumer a piece of fried dough covered in powdered sugar this afternoon :blink:

There were a couple folks in there when I wandered in just after 3pm, and shortly after that beignets were handed out, piping hot from the fryer (and yes, my mouth is a bit burned). The taste was good, but they were a bit denser than I was expecting. The caveat to that is that I haven't been to New Orleans or had a beignet in at least 4 years, so I may be mis-remembering the proper texture.

That said, the owner couldn't have been nicer. He was very friendly and more than willing to chat about the menu, New Orleans (from which he hails), and anything else. They apparently had gotten their business permits about an hour before they started cranking out the 3pm beignets.

The restaurant itself is small with one tall table and one short table up front (maybe 8-10 seats max), but they also look to have around 5 tables to set up on the patio out front. I'm sure the majority of the business will be orders to go. A few interesting things on the menu (e.g. Carolina BBQ, Cuban, and Turkey and Brie "po' boys"), but I do love some debris, so I'll have to check it out some time after it officially opens.

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So they opened for business officially on Wednesday and apparently have been slammed (some Yelp reviewers mentioned waiting an hour to get their food!). In order to avoid the craziness, I popped in around 11:30 today for a sandwich. There were only maybe 2 people in front of me in line, and the ordering process was very quick, but then it took maybe 10 minutes to get my food and pay. There were at least 12-15 people waiting with me for their food as well. I could see how this would get quite backed up as the lunch rush further developed.

I was torn between a few options (roast beef, oysters, and a pork belly special), and the order-taker steered me towards the roast beef. I loved the debris gravy when I was in New Orleans a few years ago, so was excited to try the House Roast Beef Po'Boy (with debris gravy, dressed with lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise). The website lists it at $7.50, but I think I was charged $8 (although I don't have the receipt in front of me and can't be sure). When I got this back to my office the debris was oozing out the sides of this rather large sandwich. The bread was nicely crusty and almost managed to hold the sandwich together, although the last 1/4 was quite messy. The roast beef was tender and flavorful, and oh, the debris gravy. I think I could seriously eat a sandwich with just that on it. Delicious. My slight quibbles with the sandwich were that I thought it was a bit overdressed (the mayo was a bit overwhelming for a few bites) and there was some sort of cheese on it that was not listed on the menu.

Is it 100% authentic? I am not one to make that distinction. But, it was tasty. And was quite filling. And I look forward to returning to try a few of the other options on the menu.

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Is the muffulata only on Wednesdays? I remember that being one of my favorite lunches when I was in NO about fifteen years ago (from Central Grocery). I have not been able to have that replicated since.

Any reports on the muffulata?

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The taste was good, but they were a bit denser than I was expecting. The caveat to that is that I haven't been to New Orleans or had a beignet in at least 4 years, so I may be mis-remembering the proper texture.

FWIW, when I stopped by today they had a print-out of the beignet recipe from nolacuisine.com sitting on their prep station.

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I was torn between a few options (roast beef, oysters, and a pork belly special), and the order-taker steered me towards the roast beef. I loved the debris gravy when I was in New Orleans a few years ago, so was excited to try the House Roast Beef Po'Boy (with debris gravy, dressed with lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise). The website lists it at $7.50, but I think I was charged $8 (although I don't have the receipt in front of me and can't be sure). When I got this back to my office the debris was oozing out the sides of this rather large sandwich. The bread was nicely crusty and almost managed to hold the sandwich together, although the last 1/4 was quite messy. The roast beef was tender and flavorful, and oh, the debris gravy. I think I could seriously eat a sandwich with just that on it. Delicious.

Hmmm, now I'm a bit confused. Just had one of their Roast Beef Po'Boys, and mine seemed different. It sounds like your sandwich had two distinct layers, one of roast beef, one of debris gravy. Mine was just one layer, which looked like creamed chipped beef that you might get in a diner. One of the most unappetizing-looking sandwiches I've ever eaten. Looked a little like this, only grayer:

http://www.google.co...,r:7,s:15,i:148 (This is NOT their sandwich...I just did a google search for Roast Beef Po'Boys.)

Luckily, it tasted much better than it looked...I'd order it again.. but I'm just wondering if I missed something.

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Hmmm, now I'm a bit confused. Just had one of their Roast Beef Po'Boys, and mine seemed different. It sounds like your sandwich had two distinct layers, one of roast beef, one of debris gravy. Mine was just one layer, which looked like creamed chipped beef that you might get in a diner. One of the most unappetizing-looking sandwiches I've ever eaten. Looked a little like this, only grayer:

http://www.google.co...,r:7,s:15,i:148 (This is NOT their sandwich...I just did a google search for Roast Beef Po'Boys.)

Luckily, it tasted much better than it looked...I'd order it again.. but I'm just wondering if I missed something.

Hmm indeed. Although I didn't completely dissect mine, it appeared to have slices of roast beef along the bottom, topped with the debris, which was much more shredded looking.

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Today for lunch I shared the following poorboys (the spelling I prefer, for reasons I cannot say): (1) grilled shrimp, (2) fried oyster, (3) vegetarian, which today was fried green tomato, goat cheese, etc.

All were good, especially when accompanied by Zapps potato chips, and I will definitely go again.

But I do not feel the urge to say "omg, I went to New Orleans in my mind!" They were good sandwiches, nice ingredients, well prepared. The bread was well suited for its function and was good, but not really with a "crisp crust" as the menu suggests. Maybe they would tell me that this is because I got the sandwiches to go and ate them about twenty minutes later.

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Something about this reminds me of another sandwich debate that happened some time ago....

Which is hilarious b/c that sandwich shop just opened another location DIRECTLY ACROSS THE STREET from NOPBS. Which fake bread is better?

I am not really digging this joint. The bread does not seem to be anything special. The interior is all junky and haphazard. There are Zapp's chips, but otherwise the other brand name that is littered all over the kitchen is "Sysco". I had the house roast beef and none of its components impressed me. Stylistically, I was put off by the gravy-mayo combo, but maybe that's authentic. Maybe I should do a fried catfish or oysters.

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I was pretty ambivalent about the roast beef po'boy, but the fried shrimp and andouille sausage po'boys are excellent. Certainly the best fried shrimp po'boy I've had in DC...big shrimp, very lightly fried, and plenty of them to fill the sandwich. A little heavy on the remoulade...I'll ask for it on the side next time. I can't judge authenticity, but the bread was good as well. I really liked the andouille as well...again, a healthy portion, and a good level of spice.

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