Jump to content

Expensive Knives


DanCole42
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm too tough on my knives to spend a fortune. I take decent care of them, never put them in the dishwasher, wash and dry asap after use etc, but the one thing I do is let them go dull.

I'll spend $100- $150, but that's about it.

I think some people have a passion for knives and I get that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No way I would spend that much. Even Bob Kramer (in a lecture at Sur La Table) says it's how you take care of your knives that matter.

My better knives live at home--even then, they are no where close to the $500+ range. My work knives are in the $100-$150 range. They take a lot of abuse so I get solid but not expensive ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are knives like these worth it, or just conspicuous consumption?

Trick question. To a pretentious hipster, conspicuous consumption is why it's worth it, but the knife won't cut worth beans if not maintained properly. A master sharpener will work their magic on any knife made of good steel.

That said, I would claim that the use of esoteric steels by the vast majority of custom knifemakers in this country is little more than vanity. The market is 90% driven by aesthetics, and the widespread gratuitous and inappropriate use of pattern-welded damascus steels bears witness to that.

The prime exception is Japanese knives, particularly the specialized sushi forms, not because of "blind faith" but because the Japanese repeatedly display a centuries-long history of testing the hell out of things and searching for improvements. The elevated aesthetics are on top of that.

I've spent a moderate amount of moolah over the years - meaning not as much as some of my friends - on custom knives and swords, but to be honest a good ordinary production piece tends to be free of quirks and you just don't worry about harming it if you use it. IMHO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to agree with the point on sharpening. When I first got my Edge-Pro, I practiced on a set of lower-end, stainless steel Henckel knives that Mr. lperry has. By the time I was through the block, the paring knife would pass the tomato test with the weight of a pretty small knife taking it right through the tomato. My four-star Henckels are sharper than other, much more expensive knives I've used in friends' homes. I cut up a lot of produce, and I think the investment in the sharpener was so much more important than putting that much cash into a boutique knife. A sharp knife makes the job so much easier. If I had money to burn, however...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spent $50 bucks on a 12 inch japanese knife( don't know the brand because there wasn't any english anywhere on its package). point is it will go straight through a pork spine and come back to a perfect edge with 2 minutes on a stone. No nicks. More importantly I am not constantly worried about damaging it like I would be if I spent hundreds of dollars. I do have a custom boning knife and a couple knives around $200, but unless you need them for a specialized purpose, fancy knives are purely asthetic. I agree with the post above - investing in good stones and learning to use them is far more important.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...