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Must-Visit Virginia Wineries


Joe H
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We've now been to almost fifty wineries over the years and have developed opinions of many of them. Several are ones we return to as frequently as possible while others will probably see us never walk down theiry gravel walkways again.

Two kinds of Virginia wineries emerge: one which generally has mediocre wine but absolutely stunning views. Bluemont is our favorite for this. In fact Bluemont with Virginia's most beautiful setting may host more marriages than sell wine. It's ambience has become big business while the wine is serviceable.

Yet other wineries are almost as beautiful with settings that approaching Bluemont: RDV is an idyllic mountain side stone manor featuring a cathedral like silo as its center piece. Arguably the state's best red also @ $88. Chateau O'Brien, fairly close, off of I 66 is similarly perched at the top of an expansive hill and also features very good reds including an $80 tannat. Both may be worth this much if they were known and locally appreciated but thus far I think it's a tough sell for top end VA wine. @ $40 each they are well worth the drive. Both Glen Manor's Hodder Hill and Hillsborough's Onyx 100% Tannat (both about $32, are delicious, full bodied, mouth coating jammy wines which are worth every penny. I've cellared each for over a year now and they are drinking beautifully. Both winieries also have idyllic settings with Glen Manor reminiscent of overlooking the Austrian countryside and Hillsborough's 200 year old stone tasting barn overlooking a Tuscan like Shendoah Valley.

Naked Mountain and Linden are long time worthy stops with countless new wineries opening seemingly every month.

given our success at several of our visits we look forward to discovering the next RDV or Hillsborough.

Virgnia Wine Country has become a wonderful day trip for those who live in the D. C. area. In fact I believe certainly one of the prettiest in America.

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Look for soon-to-be-released estate wines from Granite Heights (Opal, VA, b/w Warrenton and Culpeper - not a stunning view, but very nice wines, jams and honeys!). Also, in Maryland Boordy should soon be releasing their 2010 Landmark reds from their newly replanted vineyards. Also, the 2010 Syrah from Elk Run in MD is quite good.

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In addition to Hillsborough, Glen Manor and Linden, two other favs are:

Deplane Cellars - solid wines with great tasting room (one of the better winery views)

Zephaniah Farm Vineyard - neat tasting experience especially if seated in the library. WInery/tasting room(s) are in early 19th century farm house and tastings done by family members. Very personal. Wines are not bad and sometimes the owner will give an impromptu barrel tasting.

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We opened a bottle of '07 Barboursville Octagon tonight.

Wow! So much so that we need to return to the winery.

It would be interesting to taste this and the RDV side by side. I could almost kick myself since I have a few bottles of it left but didn't open one.

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While reading the messages above the first places that popped into my head were the ones I did not like. But as Joe H. said, that's a different subject!

My most recent tasting excursion was in March when I visited several wineries in the Williamsburg/Richmond area. While they had the typical Virginia repertoire, in terms of view Saude Creek Vineyards was the best. The people there were very friendly and since I was there on March 18 they added to the tasting list their leftover St. Patrick's Day sangria-like concoction, the color of which can be easily guessed. They're up on a hill, surrounded by trees, and I'd love to be there in October sitting outside and enjoying a glass.

My first visit to Charlottesville several years ago was an eye-opener in terms of the sheer quantity of wines available to be tasted; since my previous experience was only in the Northern Virginia area, to have places offering wines in the double digits was something. But for me Barboursville set the standard.

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We have several trips upcoming including tomorrow to Linden and Chateau O'Brien. A year ago I really liked Chateau O'Brien's 2008 Petit Verdot and bought a case of it. Tonight, with age on it, we opened a bottle: excellent. I might even add Really excellent! I have ten bottles left (opened a bottle a week after the original purchase) and look forward to every one. Really interested in their tannat and hopefully will be able to have a taste of it.

I've never had Linden's Hardscrabble but look forward to tasting it also.

Question: next week we'll go back to Barboursville and another stop or two. Is there any winery in the greater Charlottesville area that makes a wine that might even approach Octagon? If so we'd like to try it.

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I'm heading out to Luray VA for a wedding this weekend. I plan on swinging by Glen Manor (after all of his posts on here and the talk about Hodder Hill, I'm excited to try their wines) since its relatively close. Are there any other vineyards out that way that are worth checking out?

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I'm heading out to Luray VA for a wedding this weekend. I plan on swinging by Glen Manor (after all of his posts on here and the talk about Hodder Hill, I'm excited to try their wines) since its relatively close. Are there any other vineyards out that way that are worth checking out?

See my post a few posts back. ;) Linden and Chester Gap are both close. I haven't been to Chester Gap in a couple of years now, but the tasting room wasn't much at the time, but their wines were very good.

Joe H, they don't make a wine of Octagon quality, but I do really like King Family's wines and think they're worth a stop if you haven't been.

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I don't even want to list the number of Virginia wineries I have been to at this point, but I do want to go to more. Most all of my experiences are wrapped around the Ablemarle/Nelson/C-ville area. And if you go to posts on C-ville you can find more details. My must visit list in that area is:

Barboursville (nice view, nice walk to the ruins, lots of good wines, a few really good), White Hall (pretty winery, a number of good wine), Mountfair (nice view, not stellar tasting room, but really good reds). Absolute musts.

Flying Fox (small little place but on the way to some others and good wines, although the best are wine club only), King Family (nice area, really great polo games, good wines), Jefferson (their wine member parties are fun, new tasting room a bit crowded, but nice outdoor area, good wines though), Veritas (very pretty, wines I am back and forth on year to year), Pollack (beautiful setting and tasting room, some good wines, some I really don't like) as high on the list.

The problem is starting to become that my favorite wines are not on the tasting lists at some of these places (for example the cuvee de champs at White Hall which is similar to an Octagon), or are wine club only, and with only two people we can only drink so much wine. We are going to have to start wine swapping with other people in other wine clubs. Of course Food of All Nations in C-ville has a great selection of most of the wine in the area and sometimes has stuff you can only get wine club.

I greatly enjoyed Linden and Fox Meadows (which has a great view) in this area, didn't really like the atmosphere at Chateau O'Brien. Still need to get to Glen Manor, we just recently haven't been home much.

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Hillsborough remains my favorite overall winery in the state of Virginia.

We went to Linden (Hardscrabble was very good but $42 is a stretch for it) and Chateau O'Brien today. I finally was able to try the $78 Tannat which was excellent for a $42 wine. Probably the third best red I've had in VA behind RDV and Octagon. (Note: I am not considering Glen Manor Hodder Hill in this statement.) It would be interesting to have the Chateau O'Brien Tannat and $32 Hillsborough Onyx side by side.

Fox Meadows is beautiful as is Bluemont (the best view of any VA winery that we've been to) but similarly the wine we tasted was mediocre. Still, we would go back for the view alone.

Ktmoomau, I really appreciate your comments on the Charlottesville wineries. We've been to several and next week are going to start working our way through a number of them with return visits to Barboursville and we'll also try White Hall.

Wine clubs? I should mention Breaux' wine club. When you walk in the door of the tasting room they display twenty or more different wines which are ONLY available to members of their wine club. What compounds this is that you pay them X number of dollars every two months and THEY PICK THE WINE THEY WILL SHIP TO YOU. I tried to buy one/two of the twenty + bottles (some of which were $32) and they would not sell me a single one. I had to be a member of the wine club. When I asked the question how would I know if I even liked a particular wine they told me that I had to join the wine club and taste them (all?) before making a decision. Then I noted that I only drank red and half of the wine club wines are white: what was I suppose to do with them? For that matter I didn't want them to pick the wines for me; I wanted to pick my own.

Anyway, I ended up buying a bottle of their $32 "over the counter" Reserve which we drank two glasses of and didn't like.) I should probably be thankful; they saved me the trouble of drinking any of the other twenty bottles which I am assuming were downhill from the Reserve.

Somebody else should say something nice about Breaux Vineyards here. We won't return.

It would be appropriate if someone would forward my comments to the owner; I would appreciate she/he explaining how their wine club works and why, for someone who wants a particular wine, it is worthwhile.

I'd also like to know how a wine writer can walk into their tasting room and try a sip or a glass of a particular bottle without belonging to their wine club? For that matter if I found one of their wines that I absolutely loved at a friend's house and wanted to buy a bottle or two-how would I do it if it is restricted to the wine club? It would seem that I can't. I am also assuming that if Parker or someone from the WS walks in they will similarly refuse to let them try a particular bottle unless they belong to their wine club.

I have never had an experience as bad in any winery anywhere else in the world. And, yes, I talked to the manager and she confirmed that they do NOT make any exceptions to their policy.

Are there other Virginia wineries with wine clubs like this? This is the link to Breaux's wine club which specifically notes that the wines "are specially selected by our winemaker, Dave Collins." http://www.breauxvin...breauxvineyards Further, "Cellar Club exclusive wines are never offered to non-members for sale or tasting and each bares an exclusive Cellar Selection label." They are very straightforward about this: you can't buy any of these 20 or so wines unless you are a member of their club. They also pick the wines you will drink for $48-55 every two months + tax, shipping/handling.

There are too many wineries in VA and elsewhere in the world that I feel that I don't need to commit $300-350 or so a year to and have someone else pick wine for me that I may not like.

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For the most part, I share your sentiments. From what I've heard and read, they have some really good wine that's only available to members..but then how would we know based on our personal taste? Make friends with members I guess. I did a regular tasting and liked the '05 and '06 Merlots and appreciated having the older wines in a regular tasting.

PS - I opened a bottle of 2008 Onyx (1 of 3) on Wednesday and really enjoyed it. I don't like Hillborough's whites, but I appreciate the contrast between their reds and the reds of Linden and Glen Manor. Hillsborough's are bigger and fruitier I think, while Linden/GMV have more earthy tones and have finesse. Thus, they all should be in your VA wine cellar.

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didn't really like the atmosphere at Chateau O'Brien.

The atmosphere in the tasting room is why I haven't been back there - the owner served us our drinks and it was the most obnoxious experience I've ever had in a Virginia winery. I could rant about it at length (as would the rest of our party who was there) but I don't care how good the wine is, I won't be back.

As Jen mentioned, King Family has good wines, and also a very pretty view, polo matches, and I've always found them to be incredibly friendly. That's my parents' favorite winery - they love to go there with the dogs, pick up some Blue Ridge BBQ, and hang out sipping on wine, or go to the polo matches.

When I was younger, any time I was taking someone out for a "first time" winery visit I took them to Horton. Incredibly friendly every time I went and such a wide variety of wines that folks always managed to find something they liked. I haven't been there in ages, though.

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Due to traffic getting out of DC we only had time to visit one winery this weekend, so on Friday afternoon we strolled into Glen Manor.

What a lovely setting! We were greeted by Jeff's wife Kelly who could not have been more welcoming. We tasted all of the available wines (the next iteration of Hodder Hill will be available in April) and I came away impressed with all of them as well as the stories that accompanied each. We picked up a few bottles of the Vin Rouge, Cab Franc, Rose, and Rapheus (at 25 and under, I thought they all were solid values...particularly as VA wines continue to rise upwards in terms of price).

I was very happy with the visit and will make a trip out to the vineyard in the spring to check out Hodder Hill...at which point I'll also take a look at Linden vineyards.

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I used to go to Horton all the time - sometimes weekly, when I lived down in Charlottesville. Which makes me realize that was over 8 years ago, and I'm going to go home and feel old for a while.

(It was always a good, informal time with free, generous tastings, a wide variety of wine that could guarantee most folks would find something they like, and sometimes Dennis Horton making food for everyone. I don't think their wines are the best Virginia has to offer but I do still enjoy them.)

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Went to Keswick and Barboursville on Sunday. Enjoyed Barboursville but Keswick was the surprise of the trip. All four of us thought Keswick's $50 Reserve Cab superior (yes, superior) to Octagon. Also, an excellent $25 500ml Syrah at Keswick which remarkably was almost as good for a sip the next day. Certainly this is one of Virginia's better wineries with perhaps only RDV having a better red wine in the state.

Keswick Reserve needs to receive more press.

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Has anyone been to Keswick (interesting $50 red), Horton or Trump in the Charlottesville area?

Ktmoomau?

I have been to Keswick, but not for a couple years. I was a Trump when it was Ablemarle- the tasting room is beautiful, the wine tended to be a bit young, but they had a few decent varieties, but I haven't tried any now that it is "Trump." It is a bit out of the way, but a really pretty drive. And it is kind of fun to see what is going on with all that mess of a property. Horton I was at maybe last fall, but I can't remember which wines I liked in particular, other than the Norton.

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I've been to Keswick. I really enjoyed their wines the first time I went (ages ago) and especially enjoyed that we were able to do a seated tasting on their porch, but on my most recent visit (still ages ago) I was less than enthused about the quality of the wines. Perhaps they've improved, or the quality really varies with the vintage - I had chalked it up to a place I would happily visit because of a nice setting and decent wines, but not a place I would plan a visit around.

My one trip to Trump was before the ownership change and I didn't love it, but that was more because of the tasting experience than the wines, so that may have changed. We were just instructed to go to a window, order our flight of wines, then go take a seat and drink them, which we did outside because we had dogs with us amidst a literal cloud of stink bugs (the latter part obviously not the wineries fault). I can imagine scenarios where that type of self-guided tasting would work, but most of the time I prefer to taste with a staff member who can educated me about the vineyards, wine making process, etc. I do remember liking the sparkling wines and finding the high end reds to be unimpressive/overpriced but at that point I think we were just hurrying so we could escape the stink bugs.

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While neither the pinnacle of Virginia wine, nor even the best from Glen Manor, I think my favorite single Virginia wine so far has to be the Glen Manor 2011 Sauvignon Blanc. It's utterly useful. It's very food friendly. It's _local_, from a winemaker who both knows what he's doing and chooses to make his wine on the vine. And best of all, it needs no excuses.

As an added bonus, it's available in half-bottles for a very reasonable $13, which means that without a second thought we'll crack one open just to have one glass with dinner, and never have to wonder if the rest of the bottle is going to linger in the fridge.

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We did the brown bag salon tasting/tour at RDV this weekend. While expensive ($60/pp), the brown bag format was tremendous fun. Kevin led an amazing tasting and Andrew a great tour. Your jaw will drop when you see the insides of this place. As for the wine, unbelieveable. Matched against wines that were quadruple in price, the RDVs knocked it out of the park. And it is crazy to think they have only been doing this a few years.

I don't know how much longer they will be doing the brown bag format so I suggest you make reservations soon. It is unique enough to be worth the splurge.

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Outstanding article.  Last night, with friends over, we opened Delaplane's Williams Gap, Granite Heights Humility, Linden Avenius and Glen Manor Hodder Hill.  Ten years ago this would not have happened-they would have all been California or French or Italian or Australian or....

But not Virginia.

Now, Virginia is my first choice.

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Outstanding article.  Last night, with friends over, we opened Delaplane's Williams Gap, Granite Heights Humility, Linden Avenius and Glen Manor Hodder Hill.  Ten years ago this would not have happened-they would have all been California or French or Italian or Australian or....

But not Virginia.

Now, Virginia is my first choice.

What were your friends' thoughts on the wines? Any preferences?

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It was really a general reaction to the quality of all the wines rather than comparing individual ones.  Not really a tasting, more that there were six of us and we just kept drinking.  I opened all VA wines because they were progressively going over so well.

I should note that the 2010 and 2011 Granite Heights Humility are very different wines.  The 2010 was over 15% alcohol and the 2011 around 13%.  This alone speaks volumes.  Still, a good mouthfeel to the 2011 but this was an extremely difficult vintage in VA.  The pricing of the two wines also reflects this:  2010 was released @ $19 and the 2011 @ $14, both for half bottles.

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I was recently at Trump and Jefferson.  I continue to really like Jefferson.  Trump had a few good wines, but there are a few places in that area I just like a lot better (King Family, White Hall, Mountfair, Flying Fox, etc), there tasting room is really beautiful and now they have an outside patio area and bar that are very nice.

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I went to the Wine Festival at Mount Vernon about a week ago, & really enjoyed the chance to taste so many different wines. I prefer white wine, & sampled wines from AmRhein, Chateau Morrisette, Horton, Kilaurwen, Mediterranean Cellars, Narmada, North Gate, Paradise Springs, Prince Michel, Stanburn, & Trump (Blanc de Blanc 2008 was my first taste of the evening & it was very good). I didn't try a Viognier I didn't like (although some were better than others) & although I dislike sweet wines, AmRhein's Vin de Peche was lovely & smelled exceptionally peachy. My husband split the duties with me, & drank primarily red wines (he liked several of the Chambourcins).

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Wine festivals are an interesting topic.  I've been to many of them in a lot of different places.  Almost without exception they provide an entirely different ambience than going to a winery-especially a picturesque winery-and sharing one of their better bottles.

I fully understand that wine festivals are an efficient way to sample a lot of wine.  I've done this in The Plains, the Reagon Building, the DC Convention Center and in fields, riversides and armories around North America.  I've even attempted to spit wine out so I could taste as much as possible ideally focusing on several wines that I really liked and swallow.  (This was a good theory-just not very practical.)

I must note that typically wineries do NOT pour their better bottles in these events.  And, if they do, you're probably not going to have an expansive 50 mile view from halfway up the mountain top that you are sitting on.  You may be a door off of a parking garage in downtown D. C.!

Of course I've also gone to Hillsborough, Delaplane and Glen Manor and noted that when tastings were not being done the individual bottles usually were less expensive ones.  I am guilty of coercing several couples and small groups on two different visits to try Hillsborough's Onyx which is a $32 full bodied red that is worth every penny.  Both times the others had been loading up on less expensive white or rose.  Hillsborough, like Delaplane, Glen Manor, Linden and RDV has incredible ambience and is worth a small "investment" to share a good bottle and the character of the setting.

But they are worth it.  If someone really cares about just how good a Virginia wine can be this is the time to explore it.  Not at a festival but in a tasting room or on a deck halfway up a mountain side (Delaplane) ideally with goats outside and eagles soaring overheard.  Even the occasional hanglider floating by.(Glen Manor)  For myself if the vineyard is especially steep and rocky (RDV) or if  you camp down on wrought iron chairs at a granite topped table overlooking a valley that looks, for all the world, like Panzano or Greve in Chianti with mouth coating,satiny smooth, pitch dark thick nectar sliding down the side of an oversized fishbowl at Hillsborough you may decide to do a real detailed exploration of the area.

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Due to various weddings, etc, as well as our love of visiting wineries, we've hit up a number of Virginia wineries recently. Here are a few quick thoughts:

Barboursville - Barboursville is a good place to go if you have somebody new to Virginia wine. You get to try *a lot* of different wines, all of them are at least pretty good, and you get an idea of what Virginia is capable of. It can also be like wine tasting on an assembly line, as you get in line and then slowly shuffle forward with the rest of the crowd, getting your pours of the various wines when your turn comes. When crowded I do not find it a particularly enjoyable experience.

Pippin Hill - Beautiful space. Just absolutely gorgeous. I enjoyed their wines on site (I'm never sure when tasting exactly how much I really like the specific wines until I get them home and open them), and you can do the full tasting outdoors, looking over the vineyard. Great experience.

Albermarle Cider Works - It's right next door to Pippin Hill.  Not a winery, obviously, but they make great cider, and it can be interesting to mix things up now and then.

Keswick - I like Keswick, they make very solid wine, and I'd recommend visiting.

Jefferson - The same.

Linden - The tasting that Linden does their cellar, the reserve tasting, is fantastic. It's never a group larger than six or so people, and you typically taste three reds and three whites. And within that you'll typically do something like three Chardonnays from the same vintage but different vineyards, or three Chards from different vintages but the same vineyard.  Interesting and educational, and a great setting.

Rappahannock Cellars - The property is beautiful, and I think they do a nice job on their wines.

Chateau O'Brien - Like most of the places listed above, absolutely gorgeous, and we enjoyed the wines as well.

Delaplane - It's beautiful, as Joe H much more eloquently put it above.

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I must note that typically wineries do NOT pour their better bottles in these events

I think that's a good point - I've always used wine festivals as a stepping stone to say "well, is it worth the initial going out there" rather than "their wines rock!"

Last time I visited Horton, it was almost like a wine festival - they just had so many wines to taste, but their better ones weren't available to taste. Now that I have more disposable income, I really need to go back to the C'ville area and re-visit a lot of wineries.

(But, to be honest, not Trump. Never visited in the previous incarnation, and hate Trump so much I won't support it in this one. It is, for me, like Chateau O'Brien - the wines there were good, but the owner was so annoying to my group, I never want to support him again ever. There are plenty of other good wines to drink in the mean time.)

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I honestly believe that a handful of four wineries, possibly five elevate Fauquier County to Virginia's best wine area-NOT Charlottesville.  With all due respect to Barsboursville, Keswick, King Family, Veritas, etc.  I prefer:  Linden/RDV/Delaplane/Glen Manor and possibly Hillsborough which while a step lower for its wines is anyone's equal for setting.  I've done the Octagon vertical at Barboursville and have two six pack cases of their '09 Octagon; also Keswick Reserve.  Still, I just prefer the Northern VA wineries which I now believe are leading VA onto the national stage.  Even Breaux has a single wine which is ONLY SOLD AT THE WINERY called Nebbiolo.  It's expensive @ $60.  But it's a remarkable wine that is worth the price.  A shockingly good red for VA.  I wouldn't buy another single wine at Breaux but I would spend the money for their singular Nebbiolo.  A few miles away I would stop at Hillsborough and bujy a bottle of $32   '10 Onyx Tannat, open it there, and sit outside looking at the hillside thinking for all the world, it looks like Tuscany.  Beginning to taste like it, too.

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If you go to Linden forget about the cabernet franc.  Buy a bottle of their Avenius which I prefer over their Hardscrabble Red.  At Glen Manor Jeff will release his '10 petit verdot sometime over the winter.  His '09 Petit Verdot was mind blowingly good.  We had it and preferred it to the outstanding '10 Hodder Hill.  He said that the '10 may be its equal.

Delaplane's Williams Gap and their Left Bank Reserve are almost impossible to find outside of the winery.  As noted above Breaux '07 (yes, '07) Nebbiolo is only sold at the winery.

I mention all of this because the absolute best Virginia red (excepting Barboursville '09 Octagon) does not show up on many restaurant wine lists.  The only one that I know of in D. C. that carries these is Al Dente and this is because Roberto is passionate in introducing D. C. to the best VA wine.

The Ashby Inn has a phenominal wine list-perhaps the best of any in the entire state.  They even carry '10 Glen Manor Hodder Hill in half bottles.  AND, they are the ONLY restaurant/wine shop that I know of that carries '10 Granite Heights Humility. 

Still, for whoever reads this:  please note some of the wines I've mentioned because you are only going to find several of them at the wineries.  Linden Avenius, Glen Manor Petit Verdot, Delaplane Williams Gap. 

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The Ashby Inn also carries RdV's "Exsurgo" which is their "lower grade" wine (from grapes not used in their two signature wines).  My wife and I got a bottle of it there this summer.  It was great, and at 60 bucks a bottle it's deal for an RdV.  All the money goes to a veterans charity too.  I believe they also sell this at El Dente.  I think the only place you can get this is in a restaurant that sells it or online (I don't think you can get it at RdV because of payment issues...... they wanted all the money to go to the charity and they if they sold it on site there were some problems with the billing and the charity getting the money.........at least that's what I thought they said when I was there on a tour).  Anyhow, we "discovered" it at Ashby and enjoyed it.

Also if you're in Linden and it's a warm, sunny day, try their rose.  The 2012 blows the 2011 away.  Dry and crisp and perfect.  It's probably a little late in the year for rose, but it's never too early to start thinking about next summer.  It's also one of their most economical wines, so if you want to join their case club, the rose is a cheap(er) way to get in the door.

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On 5/26/2018 at 6:16 AM, Rieux said:

Want to visit some wineries tomorrow. Delaplane is on the list. Any others I should be sure to visit nearby? I’ve like aspen dale in the past. Or any good antique shops to make a day of it?

It might be tough to reserve right now for Sunday, but it's worth giving a try:

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