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La Tagliatella, a Poland-Based Italian Chain Owned by AmRest - Both Clarendon and Germantown Branches are Closed

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La Tagliatella is supposed to open this Monday, April 1, in Clarendon in the 3 Bar and Grill location.  The menu is posted here on their website.  It has a wide selection of mix and match pastas and sauces as well as pizzas and other items.

I'll reserve judgment and give it a try first.  (The website also says wifi is available at Clarendon.)

According to its website:

La Tagliatella, is owned by AmRest Holding SE (AmRest, WSE); the largest operator of independent restaurants in Central and Eastern Europe with more than 700 restaurants. We have more than 135 La Tagliatella restaurants globally in Europe, Asia, India and the US.
        
There will also be a location where Extra Virgin in Shirlington was.

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Yes, reserving judgment until actually trying it is the right thing to do.

Then again, their focus is "central and eastern Europe" but this is an Italian concept, which I think is southern Europe. And, 700 restaurants is A LOT of restaurants. :huh:

Yes, reserving judgment until actually trying it is the right thing to do.

Yes, reserving judgment until actually trying it is the right thing to do.

Yes, reserving judgment until actually trying it is the right thing to do.

:D;):D;)

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They own more than 700 restaurants and 135 of them are versions of La Tagliatella...so how is that "independent"?

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I counted 95 different menu items, not including dessert. And there are pictures of the food on the menu.

It's hard to reserve judgement.

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I counted 95 different menu items, not including dessert. And there are pictures of the food on the menu.

It's hard to reserve judgement.

But where else are you going to go to get risotto in cream sauce?

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Although, I'm reserving judgement, I'm not reserving snark:

This place sounds like an excellent complement to the Cheese Cake Factory across the street.

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Stopped in last night as a sort of last resort option after trolling Clarendon for a little while. The space feels like a slightly more upscale version of Maggiano's, but less cavernous. Last night at 8:30 the bar area was full, but maybe half the tables were occupied.

Wine list was fair but not extensive, I was surprised to see a Quintessa on the menu, and at $205 the markup wasn't out of line. The odd part was that no vintage was listed :unsure:

It' sounds strange, but with hundreds of combinations on the menu, I actually found the selection somewhat limited... Not being a huge fan of pasta as my main, other options were pizza, baked dishes, and a few proteins. The pasta selection seemed pretty heavily in favor of cream sauces - again this is personal preference, but not being a big cream sauce person, tomato or wine-based sauces were limited.

I ended up getting the Lasagna Verde ($15.50) - a sizeable portion of lasagna with spinach, golden raisins and pine nuts. Once I got past the slightly odd texture of the pine nuts in the mix, I really enjoyed this dish. On the flip side, my +1 ordered the Traditional Lasagna ($16), which was a disappointment. While I'm not a fan of salty foods as much as some, this was almost inedibly salty. It also came topped with a strangely orange tomato(?) sauce that reminded me of Chef Boyardee canned sauce.

4 mini scoops of Gelato for dessert (6$) to finish things off. All in all, it was $72 for 2 wines, 2 beers and one cocktail, 2 mains and 1 dessert. Not too bad, though we trended on the less expensive side of the menu.

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While I'm not a fan of salty foods as much as some, this was almost inedibly salty. It also came topped with a strangely orange tomato(?) sauce that reminded me of Chef Boyardee canned sauce.

Tomato sauce can turn orange when there is A LOT of fat in it. From your description, it sounds like they follow the maxim: "if we cram as much salt and fat as possible in everything, people will love it." Which is probably true.
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Wine list was fair but not extensive, I was surprised to see a Quintessa on the menu, and at $205 the markup wasn't out of line. The odd part was that no vintage was listed :unsure:

This screams "lazy and corporate." I'm not saying there's "no excuse" for this, but it's not unlike buying a car without knowing the year.

I can envision some scruffy (yet handsome) dude in Italy, wearing an expensive, but wrinkled and schleppy, suit, shirt unbuttoned, no tie, feet on his desk, smoking a Macedonia, phone in his ear because he's leaning back in his desk chair and typing, telling his underlings to slap together this wine list with "whatever the current vintage the distributor has - the Americans won't care."

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DonRocks, on 09 May 2013 - 12:42, said:

This screams "lazy and corporate." I'm not saying there's "no excuse" for this, but it's not unlike buying a car without knowing the year.

I can envision some scruffy (yet handsome) dude in Italy, wearing an expensive, but wrinkled and schleppy, suit, shirt unbuttoned, no tie, feet on his desk, smoking a Macedonia, phone in his ear because he's leaning back in his desk chair and typing, telling his underlings to slap together this wine list with "whatever the current vintage the distributor has - the Americans won't care."

I have a slightly different picture, and he is sitting in Poland.

Interestingly enough the website for the restaurant does not have an option to translate into Italian, I guess they are not a target audience for their "Authentic Italian" cuisine.

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I have a slightly different picture, and he is sitting in Poland.

Interestingly enough the website for the restaurant does not have an option to translate into Italian, I guess they are not a target audience for their "Authentic Italian" cuisine.

I hope everyone clicks on that first link and notices the "Brand List" at the top.

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So in the US they do Applebee's and La Tagliatella. Interesting. Looks like they have a deal with Yum! for eastern Europe...

(I haven't been to a non-airport Applebee's in ages. And in the airport, all I ordered was beer after beer after beer, given that I was stuck in LAX for 6+ hours.)

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After reading that, I am not sure what justified the half star he gave it - he has given zero in the past and the one I remember was for Taverna Cretekou and I do not recall that being nearly as bad as this review.

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In passing by there over the past few weeks it appears to be reasonably or pretty busy, though I haven't checked comments on that "other website" whatever it is called, welp, or blelp, or drelp, or whatever it is.

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Well, I'm getting a hint to why Buca de Beppo is still in business. (It's not because they've gotten any of my money in recent years.) Big plates of stuff which don't cost an arm and a leg. And, it's not like you are "dining" at MacDonald's. I kind of agree with Sietsema about Olive Garden. The last time I ate there (not my choice but, then again, there wasn't a whole lotta choice) I got the most expensive item on the menu (about $13) and it was really not objectionable. Perfectly cooked shrimp with perfectly cooked pasta. And, I was very, very hungry by the time we obtained a table, having had to wait for about 45 minutes. (This experience was in El Paso, TX, BTW.)

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After reading that, I am not sure what justified the half star he gave it - he has given zero in the past and the one I remember was for Taverna Cretekou and I do not recall that being nearly as bad as this review.

My take was that the half star came from the service, the "generous and strong" cocktails, the pasta being removed from hot water at the right time (the subsequent salt assault notwithstanding), and the rare item that was good (he cited the dish with mozzarella, anchovy, and crushed tomatoes). Even then, from reading the review he was being generous.

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I wonder if this review will have any impact whatsoever on the restaurant's revenues....

I am willing to bet that there will be no impact as I suspect that there is a very small intertwining of his readers and the people that La Tagliatella are targeting as customers. I believe that they are targeting people like Yelp user Danielle G. and those types of moronic reviews will have more impact on driving people to the restaurant than Sietsema's has on driving them away (fewer and smaller words versus thoughtful long form prose).

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Just as with the Rockwell community establishing its list of "10 best hamburgers" or "10 best pizzas" so should it establish a list of "10 Restaurants to Avoid in the DC Area"....

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Just as with the Rockwell community establishing its list of "10 best hamburgers" or "10 best pizzas" so should it establish a list of "10 Restaurants to Avoid in the DC Area"....

I can think of 10 in my neighborhood.

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Sometimes I forget how spoiled we are to live here. Then I travel, and have a mediocre dinner in the best reviewed, most fabulous, hottest restaurant in (fill in the blank), and remember.

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Seitsema ethering a place? I better hurry to get there, I bet it's delicious.

Funny line though "Someone needs to put a stop to this threat to our nation." I would say the same about him and this city. But he's probably right about this one.

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Though i found the review amusing, i was wondering--is there anyone out there who's been there and can comment on whether or not it really is that bad? on one hand, i generally find TomS to be far too generous in his reviews of places and overly impressed with cleverness/novelty over taste (what he finds rave worthy i often think is "fine" or "average-to-good") so i'm thinking that if he didn't like it, it must be abysmal. on the other hand, most of his criticisms seemed to revolve around his dislike of the idea of some of their versions of traditional favorites. of course caesar salad shouldn't come with a choice of dressings, but are tomatoes that odd an addition? are croutons really that horrible in minestrone? (though of course it shouldn't be pureed). it seemed to me that his objections to the savory dishes was often to the concept, and he didn't seem to give them a chance.

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