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On 4/1/2019 at 1:04 PM, Sundae in the Park said:

I am intrigued - do you mind sharing details? How big was your tri-tip? Trimmed or untrimmed? 

I bought the tri-tip from Lothar’s in Purcellville. (First time there—excellent German butcher)

it was three pounds, and I spent a little time trimming one side of it. 

Seasoned with salt only, then cooked at 131 for nearly 7 hours. Patted it dry, applied olive oil, then a little more salt, fresh pepper, and garlic salt. Seared over very high heat on my Big Green Egg for a few minutes. 

Great results. Very tender and cooked evenly through. Highly recommended! 

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On 4/1/2019 at 12:46 PM, Smita Nordwall said:

Can you share the recipe for the chicken, please? 

:)

1 chicken cut into 12 pieces (either do it yourself or have your butcher do it for you)
75 ml olive oil
2 garlic cloves
a pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
a sprig of rosemary
250 ml pinot grigio
salt
freshly ground black pepper
15 ml red wine vinegar
pitted green and black olives

I have done this with chicken and rabbit, and prefer chicken by far.

Warm olive oil in a pot over medium heat, then add chicken skin side down. Brown meat until a golden crust forms, then turn over. Time is your friend here since the color will wash out in the braise if you don't brown the meat sufficiently.

While the chicken is browning, mince the garlic and the rosemary leaves together. When the meat has browned sufficiently, sprinkle the garlic and rosemary over the chicken. Pour over the wine. Season with salt and black pepper. Raise heat and bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low and cover. Braise chicken for anywhere from 45 minutes to 1 hour, 15 minutes depending on the age of the chicken.

When the chicken is done, scatter olives on top and stir in vinegar. Serve immediately.

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21 minutes ago, Smita Nordwall said:

Thanks

ditto

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Last night was chicken breasts (dredged in seasoned flour and cooked in some oil in a skillet), green beans with lemon and butter, and macaroni and cheese enhanced with some of the hot pepper compote left from the plantain dish. We also had cole slaw and crostini (olive oil, garlic, freshly-dried basil*, Parmesan). Adding the compote added a spark to the mac and cheese.

Editing for what I forgot. I have an ongoing problem with my side-by-side refrigerator/freezer. I always try to keep things that can't freeze away from the freezer wall, because having the fridge at the right temperature leads to things there freezing. I had a whole clamshell of basil I'd bought for something freeze recently after it got jostled around and ended up in the bad place. I wasn't sure if it could be salvaged. I decided to dry the leaves as well as I could with paper towels and then oven dry them. I heated the basil on a sheet pan on parchment. 250F for 20 minutes, turned the oven off, and then I let the pan(s) stay in the oven for close to 24 hours. I took them out and crumbled the dried basil. This took an insane amount of time and labor for a minuscule final product but the basil didn't go totally to waste. (There were some leaves that couldn't be salvaged.)

 

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54 minutes ago, Pat said:

Last night was chicken breasts (dredged in seasoned flour and cooked in some oil in a skillet), green beans with lemon and butter, and macaroni and cheese enhanced with some of the hot pepper compote left from the plantain dish. We also had cole slaw and crostini (olive oil, garlic, Parmesan). Adding the compote added a spark to the mac and cheese.

Similar!  Over the weekend we made a lot of baked chicken tenders (that had been marinated with soy, wine, onion powder, and sesame oil), and then last night we had pretty much the same thing but pan-fried.  Both were good but obviously the fried were better.

We've also sauteed a couple heads of cabbage that were lingering after St. Patty's Day sales. The butter-sauteed-soft cabbage was better than the cabbage lightly cooked in some the leftover chicken-frying oil.

Last night we also made a coconut-chicken curry with carrots, potatoes, and onions, eaten with rice or parathas.

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I made a hybrid fettuccine dish last night, with fresh straw and hay noodles (from Eastern Market), steamed green vegetables (broccoli, asparagus, and green beans), a cream sauce (butter, heavy cream, sour cream, grated Parmesan), and topped with toasted sliced almonds and more Parmesan. I cut/broke the vegetables all to about the same size (~1 inch), separating the asparagus tips and steaming them separately. I scattered the tips over the serving bowl before adding the final nuts and cheese.

We also had red leaf lettuce and sliced plum and Campari tomatoes with Avocado Green Goddess Dressing (Bolthouse Farms) and toasted buttered baguette slices.

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I was given the leftover tray of crudite from an event- because they knew I would use it- ahhhh.  I mean I likely will, but still, the pressure.

So I had a bunch of cauliflower and cherry tomatoes.  I cut up the tomatoes, and made a cauliflower, tomato sweet curry with coconut milk, tarragon, curry powder, garlic, ginger.  I added frozen peas and chicken meatballs from the fridge/freezer.  We had it with rice and naan that was leftover from the birthday dinner I had.   

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1 hour ago, ktmoomau said:

I was given the leftover tray of crudite from an event- because they knew I would use it- ahhhh.  I mean I likely will, but still, the pressure.

Worst-case, you could just freeze the stuff you can use in soup/stock. I used to have celery guilt because I could never use up a whole bunch before it went bad (heh, we don't really like celery except in soup). BUT!! I figured out that I can save it for later and alleviate all guilt! If I have a little time/the cutting board out already, I dice the stalks so they are ready to be dumped into any mirepoix. If I have no time/energy to deal with it, I just rinse and freeze and throw into a stockpot sometime later. Most of the things that don't freeze well probably roast well so could be made with minimal effort.

Last night we had zucchini fritters with a sour cream sauce, since we were out of yogurt.  So rich!

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3 minutes ago, Sundae in the Park said:

Worst-case, you could just freeze the stuff you can use in soup/stock. I used to have celery guilt because I could never use up a whole bunch before it went bad (heh, we don't really like celery except in soup). BUT!! I figured out that I can save it for later and alleviate all guilt! If I have a little time/the cutting board out already, I dice the stalks so they are ready to be dumped into any mirepoix.

Good idea!  I will likely make some quick fridge pickles, as I love pickled carrots and radish, and Hubby likes cucumber quick pickles (I don't mind them, but they aren't my big thing).  And I thought about making a cucumber dip for a meeting I have Tuesday (as I was also given a large thing of crackers to re-use for the meeting).  But there is a pretty hefty bag of stuff left, freezing pre-chopped is genius level thinking, I am not sure why I previously didn't do this.

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While the site was down I went to a Brazilian grocery store in my area that I did not know existed.  Two nice and easy dinners resulted from that:

1. Picanha steak sprinkled with coarse salt, seared in a screaming hot pan for just shy of two minutes on each side.  Served with buttered corn.

2.  Smoked pork loin, seared very quickly just to put some color on the outside, served with steamed green beans.

I also bought some different kinds of Charcuterie,  which I enjoyed for lunch with fruit and cheese.  Here in Fort Lauderdale, if you go west of I-95, there are some very interesting ethnic restaurants and grocery stores.

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Saturday night was burgers on the grill with cucumber, tomato and shallot salad.

Last night was homemade spinach pasta with broccoli rabe, chili flake, garlic (and a dash of fish sauce because I could not find anchovies anywhere in my pantry?), with parm and pasta water.  It was very pretty, I wish I had taken a picture, darn it.

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Saturday:
Red leaf lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes; avocado green goddess dressing
Leftover creamy fettuccine with green vegetables, chicken and toasted almonds

Sunday:
Red leaf lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes; avocado green goddess dressing
Roasted Chicken Thighs With Peanut Butter Barbecue Sauce
Leftover macaroni and cheese

Last night:
Charred sumac and oregano chicken wings
Tabbouleh

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Tonight I made chicken curry out of chicken thighs, with mushrooms and green beans.  By design it was a rather light version, with a base of garlic ginger paste, tomato paste, and chicken stock.  The Penzey’s hot curry powder, for my taste, does a nice job of bringing flavor and some heat.

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Last night was a bit of an odd assortment.  I thawed what I thought was two pork chips, but it was one large piece of pork loin chop.  So I pan sauteed it, but it had two bones running through it so I didn't think it was enough meat for two.  So I also pan sauteed a chicken breast that I had made into two portions as it was rather large.  After browning, I added red wine vinegar, butter, some herbs, a little olive oil and put the lid on to finish the chicken and create a pan sauce.  Once I pulled the pork, I added sliced mushrooms and cooked them down in the sauce.  In the oven I roasted carrots and radishes with a little onion in butter.  Served with some rice.  It was tasty, but not really thoughtful looking or lovely plated.

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Rye bread and butter
Beef stew
Buttermilk mashed potatoes
Steamed broccoli

 

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You can't imagine how glad I am this forum is back on its feet, so thanks to Don for making it happen. :)

On Saturday (April 7), we had:

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poached sable, served with butter sauce
roasted asparagus
strawberry sorbet with 25 yr. old balsamic vinegar

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And on Sunday, we had:

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crostini with ricotta cheese, pistachio, anchovy and olive
roast chicken
roasted vegetables, chicken au jus

The bird was seasoned with salt and black pepper 24 hours in advance, then trussed and roasted at 350 F (176 C) for one hour, twenty minutes.

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Nachos last night: a mix of salted and unsalted chips in two layers, mozzarella and cheddar, hot pepper salsa, grilled chicken, avocado, sour cream, black beans. The salsa was leftover from the plantain dish I made a while ago and it's hotter than what I would usually use as a salsa for nachos, so I should have gone a little lighter on that. Because of the heat in the homemade salsa, I didn't add any jalapenos or green chilies to the nachos, which I usually do.

I added some blueberries and toasted sliced almonds to the remaining tabbouleh in the fridge and served that as well.

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Turns out that I do not care for corned beef.  My mom made a classic-sounding preparation by cooking it with cabbage, carrots, and potatoes.  The veg and resulting soup were fine but the meat was too soft and weirdly salty yet not (I do NOT think this was the cook's fault!).  For someone that grew up near Boston I can't believe this is my first time having it, but I think I would have remembered...perhaps I tried it when was young and then blocked it out?  Eh, not for me.

Earlier this week/weekend (missed the site while it was down!) we made various pizzas, still more chicken tenders, lentil soup, and turkey-spinach potstickers.

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Leftover beef stew and mashed potatoes, plus leftover steamed broccoli with peanut bbq sauce remaining from the chicken recipe I make a few days back. My husband loved the peanut sauce on the broccoli.

(The chicken and bbq sauce recipe is behind the separate NYT Cooking paywall, but for anybody who has a way to get access, here.)

 

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I made this Food and Wine recipe for Mapo Eggplant.  I upped the chili sauce as I wanted it spicier, and I added bok choy and lotus root as I didn't have quite as much eggplant as called for in the recipe.  Served with wild and brown rice.  https://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/ma-po-eggplant-in-garlic-sauce  Hubby despite not liking mapo tofu, and not being very excited when I said mapo eggplant, ate two helpings so, I think we did good.

---

Lotus Root (Smita Nordwall)

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When Tweaked posted his dinner with Shaking Tofu a couple of weeks ago, I decided to put that on an upcoming menu to use a block of extra firm tofu I had in the refrigerator. So, last night I made an Andrea Nguyen recipe for the dish. It came out quite well. I used soy sauce rather than the Bragg Liquid Aminos. I'm not sure how well the leftover salad is going to hold up. I'm thinking of heating the leftovers in a quick beef ramen soup.

We also had leftover chicken wings, with carrots, celery, and ranch/blue cheese dressing.

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Not much cooking this weekend.

On Saturday (April 13), we had an early dinner party with friends where we all cooked from

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this was my contribution:

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Haricots mange-tout à l'étuvée from "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" by Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck, page 448 (40th anniversary edition).

1 1/2 kg wax beans
28 g softened butter
225 g diced onions
salt
black pepper
herb bouquet - bay leaf, parsley, thyme
350 g shredded Boston lettuce
112 g butter
350 ml chicken stock
400 ml light cream
minced parsley

I had to drain the liquid in the Dutch oven right before adding the cream. That's probably my only criticism because made as written, the liquid didn't evaporate like it says in the recipe.

This will get made again - and when that happens, I'll be altering the method and ingredients. For one, the amount of chicken stock and cream will be reduced.

There were also these:

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endive gratin with ham.

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daube de boeuf

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I don't remember what these were...

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petits chaussons with Roquefort

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strawberry tart

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mousse au chocolat

this had a touch of Cognac for that extra-special je ne sais quoi

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On 4/14/2019 at 8:31 AM, Pat said:

When Tweaked posted his dinner with Shaking Tofu a couple of weeks ago, I decided to put that on an upcoming menu to use a block of extra firm tofu I had in the refrigerator. So, last night I made an Andrea Nguyen recipe for the dish. It came out quite well. I used soy sauce rather than the Bragg Liquid Aminos. I'm not sure how well the leftover salad is going to hold up. I'm thinking of heating the leftovers in a quick beef ramen soup.

We also had leftover chicken wings, with carrots, celery, and ranch/blue cheese dressing.

So I have Andrea's Vietnamese Food Any Day cookbook (very good btw), and I have found that using the Shaking Beef marinade but then applying it to the Shaking Tofu recipe is very successful.

Basically mix together the oyster sauce through garlic ingredients under the beef section, but then follow the cooking directions for the Shaking Tofu recipe.  The combination of the oyster sauce and fish sauce is pretty killer and more flavorful than just using soy sauce or the liquid aminos.  I've found that adding about one Tablespoon of water to the marinade helps loosen it  up a bit, and the final sauce is less gloopy.

It's become one of my go to tofu recipes.   

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