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Dinner - The Polyphonic Food Blog

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Black bean and potato tacos.
I roasted tricolor baby potatoes with smoked paprika and cumin till crispy. I had mashed some black beans for dip (garlic, cumin, smoked paprika) and I put those in the bottom of the tacos. Then I added the crispy potatoes, sour cream mixed with salsa, grated cheddar cheese, and shredded lettuce. Quite successful. 

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On 3/19/2020 at 1:17 AM, DonRocks said:

Really?

Yes. Two separate flavors. Sargol 1a saffron, and Bronte pistachio paste.

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Yesterday and today, we did triage on our refrigerators {yes we have 2} and did a lot of prep and cooking. That informed today's dinner.

Clam salad: left over clams that had been steamed w/garlic & white wine, removed from the shell and tossed with Japanese seaweed noodle, shredded carrot & English cuke, sesame oil, vinegar, mirin, soy. Really good and the noodles are crunchy which was unexpected.

Greens soup: we cooked this yesterday but finished it today and started eating it. Cooked radish and daikon greens, a carrot, one celery stalk, a bunch of flowering Tuscan kale, some green onion, garlic & ginger until soft. Added some cream and milk at the end. Today I pureed it in the Vitamix w/Asian pear, apple, ginger, a bit of raw onion and added the clam juice {we had nearly a quart!} We ate it and it was pretty stringy from the greens. I am going to pass the remainder thru a mouli if I can.

Beet greens sauteed w/garlic & olive oil, w/lemon juice

Kalettes sauted w/caramelized onion, olive oil, salt, pepper, spice rub, Aleppo.

Drink: Korean yogurt & soju blended with ginger juice, a bit of syrup from Luxardo cherries, simple syrup

Later, more gelato.

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Last night was a snack dinner of dried fruits, pita chips, gruyere and some sparkling wine.

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14 hours ago, deangold said:

Kalettes sauted w/caramelized onion, olive oil, salt, pepper, spice rub, Aleppo.

I have only roasted kalettes with olive oil and salt til crispy and delicious. If you sauté them, do you sauté until soft?

 

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I cut them in half. Used a carbon steel pan but cast iron would work too. Then I sliced half an onion into rings and cooked them in olive oil until caramelized. The I rinsed the kalettes and left about 1/4 cup water on them. Tossed them onto the onions, truned a fw times and covered for about 3 or 4 minutes. Then uncovered, seasoned and cooked a final two minutes. They were tender crisp. Put them in a bowl, hit them with some sesame oil and lemon juice. I possibly used a drop or two of soy or fish sauce, I am too senile to remember. 

I have never got kalettes just right before so this is my method going forward. 

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Last night:
Romaine, cucumber, avocado, and radishes; mustard - white wine vinaigrette
Leftover fajitas (beef, peppers, tortillas; avocado; sour cream)
Confit tomato and kalamata olive risotto

Tonight:
Romaine, cucumber, avocado, tomato, and radishes; bottled vinaigrette
Leftover broccoli and beef stir-fry and couscous
Fried chili-spiced hominy

The rice and hominy were both quite old and both turned out well. Yay! A while back I pulled out of the freezer a partial pack of really good rice I had bought at Wegman's many years ago for risotto. Pretty sure it was Carnaroli. I'd wrapped the remainder tightly in foil and stored it in the freezer. It then sat in the refrigerator for weeks, 1/2 cup of great risotto rice. Last night I decided it was time and started researching scale for small batch risotto.

I was cooking down some grape tomatoes that were starting to get a little shriveled and were less than optimal for salad anymore and decided that would be a good addition to the risotto. This was just tomatoes flavored with thyme sprigs that went in with them into some evoo in a heavy pan for long-cooking. I thought chopping some kalamata olives I had in the fridge was also be a nice addition to go in with tomatoes and Parmesan (jumping ahead: I forgot the Parmesan but it was great anyway). This required more chicken broth than the scale I'd worked out but that was for arborio and I think carnaroli takes more. My husband loved this risotto, which was gratifying for the cook.

The dried prepared hominy was from Rancho Gordo. I'd managed to get RG Christmas Limas that were also quite old into edible condition a number of weeks ago so I forged ahead with the hominy, soaking it overnight, draining, then putting it into a crockpot with more water for quite a  few hours. Once I saw some pieces were fragmenting, I checked on it, and the hominy was done cooking. I reserved some of it in its water in the fridge and dried on dish towels the remaining portion. For this I went with an idea I saw from Alex Guarnaschelli on twitter for canned hominy: dry thoroughly and pan fry until crisp. It was impossible to get this stuff fully dry so I tossed with a little cornstarch (which seems redundant but it helped), chili powder, ground pink peppercorn, and a little salt. I fried in some evoo in a screaming hot cast iron pan until it was crispy. I don't know if I was supposed to use oil, but it worked. It was good mixed in with the stir-fry. The End.

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I passed the greens soup thru the mouli and we had a mug or two of that to start. Really improved the soup. I put it in the Vita Mix at high for a minute.

Baked beets, chilled and marinated in red wine vinegar, lots of salt & pepper, a few drops olive oil

Pork belly and skirt steak on the yaki niku grill. I rubbed the meats with yuzu kosho and let it sit for almost an hour. We dipped into salt W/sesame oil; soy; wasabi

Pistachio gelato

Dinks: 

Negroni type to start: Green Hat gin, Capitoline white vermouth, Luxardo Aperitivo Americano {their Aperol. its really better than the original!} angostura orange bitters, Bitterman's hopped grapefruit. 

A glass of Cenatiempo Ischhia rosso: nicely ripe and chewy piedirosso

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Friends who live in my building, and who are more like family, decided it was very low risk to get together for dinner last night, since we had been seeing each other every day before the social distancing order. We have all been behaving properly since then. So...
A salad of arugula and Romaine with grape tomatoes and homemade Caesar dressing plus Parmesan cheese. 
Chicken paprikash served over egg noodles. 
Lovely Italian pastries brought over by the neighbor. 
Corona beers and cheap white wine!

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Last night was turkey meatloaf, roasted new potatoes and asparagus.

I didn't have a huge amount of turkey leftover, so I added in red pepper, carrot, garlic, onion, 2 bread heels which were all chopped in the food processor, and an egg, salt and pepper.  It could have used a little more spice, and I completely forgot the ketchup.  So it wasn't great, but it was fine.  It will make a good sandwich cold with mayo- so there you go.  

The asparagus and potatoes were just a little butter, olive oil, salt and pepper and were good.  I tried to do smashed potatoes, but they didn't quite get as crispy, next time I will do them a little differently and pre-cook in the microwave then smash, use more butter, maybe add Old Bay because that is what people from Maryland do...

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Guacamole and lime sea salt tortilla chips
Leftover sliced chicken breast with giblet gravy
Buttered asparagus
Leftover mac and cheese spruced up with green chile salsa and chipotle in adobo

The salsa was made and canned by a co-worker of my husband several months ago. There was only a little bit left and the jar had been open for a while, so I finished it up as I did a shells and cheese remix. We've got the jar set aside to return to him...at some point in the future. Could be a while.

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Last night was salmon terriyaki with forbidden rice and seaweed salad.  

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1 hour ago, ktmoomau said:

Last night was salmon terriyaki with forbidden rice and seaweed salad.  

did you make the seaweed salad? 

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Just now, Smita Nordwall said:

did you make the seaweed salad? 

No, it was the last of a package from Costco- which was fine, but I forgot that the last time we ate it, I added pickled ginger, lime juice and sesame seeds, which I think really help to amp it up just a little.

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3 hours ago, ktmoomau said:

No, it was the last of a package from Costco- which was fine, but I forgot that the last time we ate it, I added pickled ginger, lime juice and sesame seeds, which I think really help to amp it up just a little.

How long does that last once opened?

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1 hour ago, Smita Nordwall said:

How long does that last once opened?

Not sure what the box says, but it seems to have lasted a pretty long time since I opened it, it's likely been two weeks... I checked it to see if I thought it had gone bad in any way, and nope.  Maybe between the vinegar and seaweed, they keep bacteria away?

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We have been nibbling all day so we probably could call this brunsupdin. But I will try and find a logical point to start the listing.

Crudite w/ume paste. We used up the last of the S&B brand from Japan and started with the Eden Foods ume. This ume is a little thinner and side by side, not as good. But honestly, I don't think we will noticeably suffer until our next shipment arrives from Japan.

Next was a romaine head, wedge and covered with homemade tzatziki. I need to make a batch of caesar dressing because we have a lot of romaine.

Eggplant marinated in sesame oil and soy, pan fried and finished in the oven at 425. The eggplant was a little thin on some slices and those wound up chip like. The thicker peices were really tasty and had a great texture.

King Oyster mushroom w/olive oil & soy. Pan roasted. When they were almost done I crushed garlic cloves over the pan and let the garlic cook in the cooling pan. Kay and I both said how much we love king mushrooms and at $1.99 at HMart, they are a significant bargain!

Skirt steak and pork belly, both local, marinated in Thai fish sauce & shio koji 48 hours, done on the yaki niku grill. 

some green onions done on the yaki niku grill. WHich might have transformed it into a yaki negi grill. 

Cocktail which came after the sald and before the eggplant/king mushrooms

My favorite martini: Plymouth gin and Dolin dry 3 to 2, Peychaud's aromatic bitters, Bitter Truth olive bitters, 6 drops, lemon twist. 

Wine: the remainder of the Ischia Rosso from the other night by Cenatiempo. SO GOOD! Kay had a glass of Ciro Rosso by Scala from Calabria which we will undoubtedly finish tomorrow. 

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Individual nachos
Romaine, tomato, marcona almonds; mustard - white wine vinaigrette
Chicken mushroom noodle casserole

The casserole was done basically the way I make tuna noodle casserole, except I used leftover chicken breast and I didn't put hard boiled eggs in it. Good comfort food.

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A few years ago, I googled 'world's best recipe' and found this one which happens to be for lasagna.  To earn the title of 'World's Best', you have to bring it...  This is classic food - not vegetable, no bechamel, nothing fancy, just straight up 'grandma style' lasagna, but it is daaaaaamn good.  It does take some time - I usually make the sauce the day before and then assemble the day of.  This is often a recipe I make for those with newborns, having surgery, in need of meals, etc.  It is relatively inexpensive to make, travels well, and is better the next day.

Served with a Wegman's caesar salad mix and a forgettable bottle of Total Wine Pinot Noir.  

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I made a small batch of creamy Caesar dressing {i leave it to purists to argue about Carandini's Caesar etc} which we had over romaine. Next was leftover broscht from the freezer w/brisket, yellow beets, cabbage, potato and beef stock.

Cocktail: Ric Flair

Missile IPA from Champion: Good stuff!

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Yesterday's cold, rainy weather called for a pasta dish, and I found this recipe for "Sausage Carbonara". It's certainly not what I know to be traditional carbonara, since it uses cream, but it was surely delicious. (I added fresh peas to the recipe)

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16 minutes ago, reedm said:

It's certainly not what I know to be traditional carbonara, since it uses cream, but it was surely delicious. (I added fresh peas to the recipe)

I'd say this falls into the "don't sweat it" category (I'm pretty sure a lot of people think traditional carbonara has some cream in it).

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