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The Trite Food List

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31 minutes ago, Poivrot Farci said:

Trite kitchen apparel submission:  Form-over-function designer $90+ cross-back aprons that one must “get into” over the head with the help of a chamber maid or Jeevus the obsequious dishwasher.

I had to wear one of these cross-back things recently. I consider myself a reasonably intelligent person, but it must've taken me 10 minutes to figure out how to put it on. Actually, I'm still not sure I got it right. 

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I understand I'm squarely in Grumpy Old Man territory with this one, but ...

Young, Poorly Trained, Hipster, Cauc-Asian (*) Fusion

Basically, if you use anything with Sriracha Mayonnaise ...

(*) Fifty years from now, "Asian" is going to sound just as strange to the reader as "Oriental."

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Sorry, but you’re definitely verging on ‘grumpy old man’- sriracha or sambal oelak or spicy salsa is the best thing that can happen to mayonnaise- she says as she dips her cold roast chicken in Taco Bamba salsa.

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12 minutes ago, thistle said:

Sorry, but you’re definitely verging on ‘grumpy old man’- sriracha or sambal oelak or spicy salsa is the best thing that can happen to mayonnaise- she says as she dips her cold roast chicken in Taco Bamba salsa.

"Homemade" is the best thing that can happen to mayonnaise!

(I don't always have jarred mayonnaise, but when I do, I like a little Sriracha.) 

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True, but if you’re not making homemade, add some heat. & I always have jarred mayo, Hellman’s olive oil (nice plastic jar you can turn upside down to get out the last stuff). I’d like to see who only makes homemade mayo these days.

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19 hours ago, thistle said:

True, but if you’re not making homemade, add some heat. & I always have jarred mayo, Hellman’s olive oil (nice plastic jar you can turn upside down to get out the last stuff). I’d like to see who only makes homemade mayo these days.

C'est moi. And I love mixing it with sambal oelek.

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On 3/19/2018 at 1:39 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

Too many restaurants have charcuterie.

In my youth I used to eat salami and other spiced sliced meats so regularly that the very concept of charcuterie surprised me.  Was this not commonplace?? I had  Sliced spicy meats with mustards breads olives quite often.  The very concept of charcuterie as a new delicacy was confounding.  Salami’s were the number one meat from my youth and into my 20’s. 

And then in our home growing up we had a pet dog Skipper who lived to dash outside and race around for hours if all doors weren’t carefully guarded.  Skipper also loved salami.

When the dog escaped our standard effort to recover him was to dash outside with salami.   “Here Skipper, salami!!!”

I suppose if his state was hungrier rather than rangier he would return for the treat, allow one of us to grab him by the collar and give him his treat.  If not hungry we could never catch him. In those cases we wouldn’t see him for hours.

The first time I was at a restaurant with my brother that had charcuterie, he being marginally faster and with longer arms, slightly beat me to the punch picked up a piece of salami, and with a big grin, stared me in the face, and said “Here Skipper, salami!!”

Charcuterie!   It’s a nice treat.  I don’t mind it everywhere.

Go to Stachowski’s and then create your own mixed delicacy.

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On 3/19/2018 at 6:39 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

Too many restaurants have charcuterie.

Mark Kuller once told me something I sloughed off at the time, but he was right: If you don't make really good charcuterie, it's best to purchase charcuterie. As ubiquitous as it is, it's probably ubiquitous for a one-word reason: profit.

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Huge, cavernous, open-air dining areas are about as pleasant (and prevalent) as open-air office spaces. I hate them.

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Anyone using the word "buzz" or it's derivatives (buzzy, trendy, hot, white-hot) is quite often parroting a PR agent's press release, describing a huge, cavernous, open-air dining area, which is about as pleasant (and prevalent) as an open-air office space - the primary difference being the deafening noise level. These aren't designed to please the diner; they're designed because they're cheap as hell to construct - however, once the "buzz" dies down, they're the loneliest places in the world.

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More:

- Tater Tots fancified. Why? Just why?

- Roasted chicken, generally over priced even at casual restaurants (I'm looking at you, Rustico, and others of your ilk)

- Turkey burgers. Invariably on menu. Invariable poor quality. Rubbery. Topped with weird things. Why not just top it with same thing as a burger? Turkey eaters like fried eggs and bacon, too.

 

Never trite to me

- Pizza. If you have a kitchen, give it a go. I'll probably try it. I'll probably not like it, but I'm going to try it.

- Lamb burgers. I don't eat hamburgers, but I, too, want in on the fun.

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On 1/15/2018 at 2:52 PM, Simul Parikh said:

Brunch (as a concept)

Meatballs as an appetizer

Deviled eggs

Hummus made out of something other than chickpeas/tahini

Thai curry ______ at non-Thai restaurants

 

Brunch-  Still eating and enjoying brunch since the 1970’s though the paper NY Times is rarely there

Meattballs as an appetizer:  meatball appetizer at Casa Luca was sublime

Deviled eggs:  helluva food markup item, but you gotta do what you gotta do 

If someone makes a great tasting hummus like dish out of other items- bravo  Had this with other ingredients at Bayou Bakery.  Found it tasty and spicy.

Thai Curry at a non Thai restaurant—hm yet to try that

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4 minutes ago, DaveO said:

Thai Curry at a non Thai restaurant—hm yet to try that

Most commonly a way to prepare mussels, I think.

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42 minutes ago, Ericandblueboy said:

Most commonly a way to prepare mussels, I think.

Didn't know that.  Thanks.

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On 8/7/2006 at 10:40 AM, qwertyy said:

Has the beet and goat cheese salad been floated as a contender here yet? I'm a huge fan of this dish, but it is on every menu in town... The preparations aren't even very different, just the presentation. Is this the new Caesar?

Wow... 12 years and still likely trite and going strong.  Kale and Brussels hit trite in 2013, they are having a 5 year trite anniversary.  Have miniburgers died, I feel like they are clinging on to the last stages of life.

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