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Some of my recs upthread from 2006 (!) are still good ones:

Max Downtown (Cityplace II) - still the best restaurant downtown. Bit of a walk from the Marriott though.

Peppercorn's Grill (Main Street) - Higher end Italian since 1989 - the Cialfi family is still fighting the good fight on a commercial strip without many businesses.

Sorella (Main Street) - Casual italian - wood oven pizzas and all pasta is made in house - we have enjoyed this relative newcomer recently.

City Steam (Main Street - across from Sorella) - Casual Brewpub.

Dish (Main Street - same owners as Sorella) - Modern american comfort food - nothing groundbreaking, but not a national chain.

Trumbull Kitchen (Trumbull Street, across from the Civic Center Xcel Center) - Small plates from the Max restaurant group

The Pepe's within driving distance is in Manchester. Would be a quick 15 minute or so drive East of the River.

Wow, thanks! We'll see where I can get them to go! There's another Pepe's in West Hartford, slightly closer than the Manchester location. I'll bet it is the newest location since it was last listed on the website and they don't seem to be in alphabetical order.

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Hartford

Pepe's in West Hartford is pretty quiet on a Monday night, though they were doing a brisk take-out business. I like New Haven style, and I can see how Pepe's is a foundation pizza of that style. The very nice waitress explained how superstitious the family has been about maintaining their original restaurant and pie specs throughout the years, even down to the sticky, tiny plastic plates and crappy thin napkins. The 18-inch is YUUUUUGE! Way too big for 2 people, and I took back as much as I thought I could cram into my hotel fridge (ate it cold for 2 breakfasts in a row; it held up well and I and enjoyed every bite). I like my crusts fluffier and less cracker-y, but the bottom crust has a nice char and chew, though it was thicker than I expected from the Neopolitan part of their heritage. I don't eat clams and do like cheese, so we got pepperoni, chicken, and mushrooms with mozz. Quite good, and I loved the way the chicken was shredded and very soft - much superior to the typical slices or chunks of grilled chicken. I can't say how the pies here compare to the original location, but they seem to care about replication at all their stores and I hate lines so this was perfect.

We had lunch at Trumbull Kitchen and I got the hanger steak while my coworker got the tenderloin. We both ate every bite of the meat and most of the sides (broccolini and haricots vert were crisp and inviting, the mashed potatoes underwhelming,  and my shitakes were seared and lovely while his portabellos were grilled and boring). It's a bustling place with almost too many options on the menu, plus they are open all day. It's a great place for a business lunch and would be fun for happy hour bites.

I hit happy hour with a friend at Salute, also on Trumbull street. The HH deals are good but the food was just OK. Squash ravioli were too sweet and the sauce was dull and the sushi roll was fine, but with nothing particularly notable about the flavor or texture of the fish, rice, or tempura. Chicken flatbread was simple but good, generous chunks of chicken, onion, peppers, and cheese, over a tortilla-like crispy flatbread. We got another of those and were too full to eat anything off the regular menu. We also got drinks from the champagne bar menu, which were basically girly martinis and heavy on the alcohol. That would be fine for most, but I like my fruity drinks a little more balanced. FWIW, the pastas on the other tables looked good and the place was packed by normal dinnertime.

We ate lunch from a couple of food trucks that camp out on Elm street during the day. Peony is typical Americanized Chinese food, but freshly cooked and the spicy items deliver some heat! We both got the black pepper chicken and it was nice slices of chicken breast sauteed with lots of vegetables in a peppery sauce redolent with red chile oil. Gave us runny noses and we couldn't quite finish our portions. The fried rice, however, wasn't anything interesting, and I'd wished I'd gotten white instead. I would absolutely grab lunch there again. They seem to take call-in orders, of which we saw many people take advantage. We also got a big bowl of tater tots from the Whey Station - ordinary but delicious, as tots tend to be, and the grilled cheess going to other customers looked nice.

The Marriott downtown is absurdly unmarked, because at street level you can't see the giant MARRIOTT sign atop the building. So just know that it's part of the convention center, and the parking garage is shared with the convention center, and you have to enter behind the building (not on Columbus Blvd., and don't enter the ramp onto the highways!!!). The multiple layers of highways (84 and 91) plus the tall buildings make GPS pretty much useless in this area, so ask about/figure out how to get out of this dead zone before you take off. Otherwise you will end up going around in circles while the stupid GPS lady is redirecting...redirecting...

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I'm in RI and have an opportunity for a toddlerless meal with my husband tomorrow night. I'm drawing a blank on where to go. Last year when we had a similar opportunity we went to Mills Tavern and enjoyed it. I'd like to try someplace different. I've only been to Al Forno once and would like to go back, but they're closed on Sundays. I'd love to try Matunuck Oyster Bar, but I hear the waits are insane even in the winter, and I'm not sure I'm up for that. Aside from Al Forno I'm not super interested in Italian, but I'd consider it. I'm also not all that interested in East Asian or South Asian food (I'm generally interested but not for tomorrow). I went to Gracie's a couple of years ago and enjoyed it, but my husband wouldn't be interested.

Does anyone have any RI suggestions for me??

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Providence

I'm in RI and have an opportunity for a toddlerless meal with my husband tomorrow night. I'm drawing a blank on where to go. Last year when we had a similar opportunity we went to Mills Tavern and enjoyed it. I'd like to try someplace different. I've only been to Al Forno once and would like to go back, but they're closed on Sundays. I'd love to try Matunuck Oyster Bar, but I hear the waits are insane even in the winter, and I'm not sure I'm up for that. Aside from Al Forno I'm not super interested in Italian, but I'd consider it. I'm also not all that interested in East Asian or South Asian food (I'm generally interested but not for tomorrow). I went to Gracie's a couple of years ago and enjoyed it, but my husband wouldn't be interested.

Does anyone have any RI suggestions for me??

Returning belatedly to report that we ended up at Cook and Brown Public House on Hope Street in Providence (on the East Side and across the street from Chez Pascal, which I've also heard good things about). We happened to be there on a Sunday so decided to do the chef's choice family style three course Sunday supper. I think this was $38 a piece. They asked us what we didn't want to eat and off they went. (At this point my husband took the opportunity to tell them that if they could highlight steak somehow he'd love that. Grr. I don't dislike steak, but I rarely order it in a restaurant.)

It's been almost 3 weeks, so unfortunately my memory is somewhat fuzzy on details at this point, but we both enjoyed our experiences. I started with the Hummingbird cocktail (fords gin, hum botanical spirit, rosemary, lemon, bubbles) (this is on their online menu, so I don't have to remember the details!). I rarely order cocktails, but I enjoyed this, as it was light and refreshing. I'm a sucker for a cocktail with herbs and bubbles. I then switched to wine and tried to order a gamay, which they were out of, so the bartender recommended a bonarda when I said I was looking for a lighter red. As anyone who knows anything about wine can probably tell, I'm clueless about wine, but I know I like lighter reds, and I greatly enjoyed this wine (I unfortunately didn't get any information on it beyond the varietal).

As for food, we started with a take on eggs benedict that included (I believe house made) lamb merguez sausage in place of pork and brioche in place of an English muffin. This was served with some lightly dressed greens and was delicious (although I was jealous of another party that received some kind of sliders made with house cured pastrami as their first course). For our main course we received steak (thanks, husband) with a romesco sauce, fingerling potatoes, leeks, and I believe shiitake mushrooms. The steak was well cooked and amply portioned. The romesco sauce was delicious. The fingerling potatoes were amazing -- crispy on the outside and creamy on the inside. I could have used a few more of those. The leeks were the only element of the evening that really didn't work for me. I'm not a huge fan of oniony flavors, so maybe it's partially just my taste, but we left a big pile of these on the plate. For dessert we had what were basically ice cream sandwiches made with pieces of a gingerbread-like cookie and I think cinnamon ice cream as the filling. They were good but didn't wow me even though I love gingerbread, and they were hard to eat because the cookies were hard to break with a fork and I wouldn't have wanted to pick them up (not sure if that would have been appropriate anyway) because the ice cream was oozing out the sides.

We'd made a reservation to sit at a table, but we ended up sitting at the bar and got great service from the bartender, who was pleasant even to the tipsy and loud neighbors who came in for drinks and tried to dominate his time and attention.

I'd recommend checking this place out to anyone who finds him- or herself in Providence (or, heck, anywhere in Rhode Island -- the state is tiny :-)).

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Taking the kids to Rhode Island for 3 nights.  What's good to eat in Providence these days?  I already booked Oberlin and Hemenway's for dinner.  Al Forno is already full.  Also stopping at Matunuck Oyster Bar on the way there for lunch.  Chengdu Taste looks like a back-up plan for authentic Chinese food.  

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My native state! I only get back there a couple of times a year and don't always get to eat at interesting places due to unadventurous family members.

I haven't been to Oberlin or even Hemenway's, which has been around forever. I'm interested to know what you think about both. I enjoyed Mills Tavern a few years ago. I've heard great things about O Dinis for Portuguese food -- there's a large Portuguese-American population in RI -- but I haven't been there.

You may want to check out Atwells Avenue on Federal Hill in Providence. There are tons of Italian-Americans in RI, too, and this is RI's Little Italy (very little). Some of the restaurants have been around for decades and at least one (I believe Camille's) hosted a mafia shoot-out, at least according to legend. I'm not sure how GREAT the food will be -- most of it is red sauce Italian -- but it would be a VERY RI experience. The Old Canteen and Angelo's are two other places that have been around forever (Angelo's since 1924).

Do you have a reservation for Matunuck Oyster Bar? They used to not take reservations, but it looks like they do now. There used to be insane waits for tables, even for weekday lunches (at least on nice days), but I'm not sure if that's changed. I only went there once a few years ago and don't remember much aside from the dreadful wine list (and I don't even know very much about wine compared to many people here). I'm pretty sure my party ordered a bottle of Kim Crawford Sauvignon blanc, which is currently priced at $42. Maybe there was a better option we missed. I did enjoy my meal as I recall. The restaurant is in a beautiful location just down the street from East Matunuck State Beach. My grandmother used to have a beach house right on the ocean just down the street from the state beach. Matunuck Oyster Bar didn't exist then! If for some reason you can't get into Matunuck Oyster Bar, Cap'n Jack's is a little further down the street on the other side (but still on the water). It's a very different place (much more rustic and much less trendy) but has delicious seafood. The lobster roll below is from Cap'n Jack's (being consumed at East Matunuck State Beach). Get clam cakes and chowder! Clam cakes are basically deep fried round fritters with bits of clam in them, an RI speciality.

What are you doing for fun in RI?

ETA: I just remembered @Bob Wells is also from RI. He may also have input!

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On 7/9/2021 at 8:11 PM, Ericandblueboy said:

Taking the kids to Rhode Island for 3 nights.  What's good to eat in Providence these days?  I already booked Oberlin and Hemenway's for dinner.  Al Forno is already full.  Also stopping at Matunuck Oyster Bar on the way there for lunch.  Chengdu Taste looks like a back-up plan for authentic Chinese food.  

Awesome, I was just up there last weekend! Yes, I'm an RI boy like @dracisk. Oberlin is strong, but it will cost ya! Try the crudos. Jacques Pepin was there recently. Hemenways has been around forever. I've not been there in forever but it's solid. Sorry you can't get into Al Forno, but keep trying, it's worth it. The summer grilled pizza with local sweet corn is amazing. My brother has known George (RIP) and Joanne since their original location on Steeple Street! In fact, he visited with them at their summer place in Provence and they had lunch with a neighbor you might have heard of -- Patricia Wells (no relation).

Now back to RI food. Old Canteen and Camille's are old-style fancy shmancy spots. Angelo's is very casual. Worth checking them out for a taste of old RI. There are a ton of newer spots on the Hill you should investigate. Also up there is Caserta's, which along with Twin's in North Providence are exemplars of another style of RI-pizza, thicker, with a crunchy crush. At both places cheese is an optional topping and i recommend you just get mushrooms and olives at either place.

There's a new seafood shack in the Jewelry District (Dyer Street) called Dune Brothers -- great RI clamcakes, fish and chips, and lobster rolls. They have done so well they are already opening a bigger place on North Main Street. 

Now, for some baked goods. Seven Stars is a great bakery on Hope St (with other locations), Scialo Bros on the Hill is a 100+ year old place on the Hill that closed earlier this year (the sisters who owned it are really old) and shut off their ovens, which are original (apparently turning them on is a big deal). Things looked bleak but a buyer was found, with the agreement that one of the sisters would run the place, and they got the ovens turned back on. I.E., this is  unique place and worth a visit. LaSalle Bakery is another old-line italian place and there are many others. Also prevalent are Portuguese bakers, with huge loaves of sweet bread, custard tarts and other delights.

if you can get to Mikes at the VFW in Cranston, do so. Excellent homestyle italian food in an actual active VFW Hall. Cash only! Bonus: The locals are a trip. You'll likely see guys in colorful track suits, even in the summer. Try the polenta!

There are some great Latino places in Central Falls (hometown of Viola Davis) and even several african spots there, in Pawtucket, and the West side of Providence.

Chez Pascal is a wonderful french spot on Hope St on the East Side. There's a place across the street called Avenue N that looks really good. If you need more tips let me know!

PS on the way back I swung by Zuppardi's in West Haven for a clam pizza and it totally rocked. Their cannoli are great too -- massive and delish. Easy access from 95 -- just call from the car and the pizza will be ready. Nice alternative to the big-name spots, been in the same family since 1934!

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38 minutes ago, Bob Wells said:

Old Canteen and Camille's are old-style fancy shmancy spots. 

PS on the way back I swung by Zuppardi's in West Haven for a clam pizza and it totally rocked. Their cannoli are great too -- massive and delish. Easy access from 95 -- just call from the car and the pizza will be ready. Nice alternative to the big-name spots, been in the same family since 1934!

I love tripe.  Will check out Old Canteen (if I get off my butt and call them for reservations) because the menu is huge (eels, escargot, frog legs!).  Does Zuppardi's allow dining in?  

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2 minutes ago, Ericandblueboy said:

I love tripe.  Will check out Old Canteen (if I get off my butt and call them for reservations) because the menu is huge (eels, escargot, frog legs!).  Does Zuppardi's allow dining in?  

Yes, when I went there were families in there eating.

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4 hours ago, dracisk said:

I've heard great things about O Dinis for Portuguese food -- there's a large Portuguese-American population in RI -- but I haven't been there.

Do you have a reservation for Matunuck Oyster Bar? They used to not take reservations, but it looks like they do now.  If for some reason you can't get into Matunuck Oyster Bar, Cap'n Jack's is a little further down the street on the other side (but still on the water). It's a very different place (much more rustic and much less trendy) but has delicious seafood. The lobster roll below is from Cap'n Jack's (being consumed at East Matunuck State Beach). Get clam cakes and chowder! Clam cakes are basically deep fried round fritters with bits of clam in them, an RI speciality.

What are you doing for fun in RI?

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Saw O Dinis featured on one of Andrew Zimmern's shows.  While I like Portuguese cuisine, their menu is too rustic and not enough seafood (only one bacalao dish!).  Thanks for the tip on Cap 'n Jack.  I plan on making reservation for Matunuck 3 weeks out but it's good to have an alternative.

For fun, (day 1 Monday) Biomes on the way from the Bronx after lunch, (day 2) all day touring the Newport Mansions (only the Topiary Garden, Breakers, Elm and Marble are open at this point), (day 3) Rogers Williams Park Zoo.  Not sure what else to do on day 3.  Boat tour? Audubon Nature Center & Aquarium?  Blitheworld?  I think Waterfire is canceled this summer?

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1 hour ago, Bob Wells said:

if you can get to Mikes at the VFW in Cranston, do so. Excellent homestyle italian food in an actual active VFW Hall. Cash only! Bonus: The locals are a trip. You'll likely see guys in colorful track suits, even in the summer. Try the polenta!

I'm going to be in RI later this summer and got some good recommendations from @Bob Wells, too! A few places I didn't know about.

A strong second for Mike's (Kitchen). It is amazing and sooooo RI. They have strange hours so be sure to check that out (e.g., they're only open for lunch on Saturdays). Like Bob Wells said, they only take cash. You get separate bills for the bar and the food. I've been trying to figure out why for years. I believe they're known for Parm (chicken Parm, eggplant Parm, veal Parm, etc.).

I've never been to Biomes, but I've heard good things about it and I know my almost 9-year-old nephew likes it. In Newport if you have time I recommend the Cliff Walk. I have a feeling you'll be very underwhelmed by Roger Williams Park Zoo after the Bronx Zoo (and assuming you're semi-regulars at the National Zoo). The Providence Children's Museum is nice if your kids are the right age. If you're beach people the beaches are reaaaaally nice. I like them much better than the beaches near DC, and they're so much easier to get to. I don't think I've ever toured Blithewold Mansion, but it's in a very cute town. I'm not familiar with the Audubon Nature Center. It looks like WaterFire isn't happening until September at the earliest, which is too bad. I'm sure there's plenty more to do ... I'll keep thinking.

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Some more bakery tips: Pastiche on Spruce St on the Hill (just down from Caserta's) is a higher-end patisserie that is amazing. Also, you might want to try yet another kind of RI pizza: pizza strips aka party pizza aka bakery pizza. It's very simple yet addictive to many RIers (others hate it so ymmv). Among the best-known purveyors are Crugnale's, Palmieri's, Calvitto's, Jeannette's, DePetrillo's, and the Original Italian Bakery. (It's easy to find so clearly there is a demand LOL) Most of them also should have calzones and spinach pies (different from Greek spanakopita, these are basically turnovers). Another RI bakery treat is Wandies, which are very similar to the Polish kruscikis.

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Plus one for pizza strips/party pizza/bakery pizza and wandies! RI has an amazing number of specialty foods for such a small state. Also coffee cabinets, Awful Awfuls, and many more. Get a Del's Frozen Lemonade when you're there! You may see a truck or a stand by the beach, or they have some storefronts.

1 hour ago, Ericandblueboy said:

I was able to get a 11:45 reservation at Matunuck for Monday Aug 2.  

Good. In summers past, before they started taking reservations, I drove by and saw cars waiting in line on the street just to get in the parking lot. I'm sure you're planning to concentrate on oysters, but if you have room for the house-made stuffie I recommend trying it (I haven't had it at MOB, but stuffies are another RI speciality). Also, the Point Judith calamari will have traveled less than 3 miles (as the crow flies) to get to your plate.

If your kids will tolerate it and the weather's nice, another Providence thing to do is wander around the East Side. There's really nice colonial architecture and Brown University and RISD are there. RISD has an art museum (which, looking at a map, I realize is only a couple of blocks from Hemenway's). Thayer Street is fun to walk around on. When I was in high school I thought it was really cool to hang out there. Of course, I'm not sure how many students will be around in the summer, but I imagine some will.

Ocean Drive is a very pretty drive in Newport (the name of the street is Ocean Drive).

ETA: I just remembered Gracie's is another fine dining option in Providence. I'm not sure how different it would be than anything you could get anywhere else, but it may be worth looking into.

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1 hour ago, dracisk said:

Plus one for pizza strips/party pizza/bakery pizza and wandies! RI has an amazing number of specialty foods for such a small state. Also coffee cabinets, Awful Awfuls, and many more. Get a Del's Frozen Lemonade when you're there! You may see a truck or a stand by the beach, or they have some storefronts.

Good. In summers past, before they started taking reservations, I drove by and saw cars waiting in line on the street just to get in the parking lot. I'm sure you're planning to concentrate on oysters, but if you have room for the house-made stuffie I recommend trying it (I haven't had it at MOB, but stuffies are another RI speciality). Also, the Point Judith calamari will have traveled less than 3 miles (as the crow flies) to get to your plate.

If your kids will tolerate it and the weather's nice, another Providence thing to do is wander around the East Side. There's really nice colonial architecture and Brown University and RISD are there. RISD has an art museum (which, looking at a map, I realize is only a couple of blocks from Hemenway's). Thayer Street is fun to walk around on. When I was in high school I thought it was really cool to hang out there. Of course, I'm not sure how many students will be around in the summer, but I imagine some will.

Ocean Drive is a very pretty drive in Newport (the name of the street is Ocean Drive).

ETA: I just remembered Gracie's is another fine dining option in Providence. I'm not sure how different it would be than anything you could get anywhere else, but it may be worth looking into.

Thayer St was my preferred hang too. I got my hair cut at Alba-Runci, worked part time at Thayer Market, spent untold hours browsing at College Hill Bookstore (motto: "Dedicated to the fine art of browsing"), scoured the used record stores etc etc.. It's still a fun area, but there are a lot more chains these days. Still, some good food such as Den-Den Fried Chicken (Korean food) on Waterman St. Other cool areas for walking around are: Hope St, Wayland Sq, and Wickenden St. Coffee Exchange on Wickenden has been around since the 1980s, great place to people watch.

Snail salad is another old-school local delicacy. It's made with sea snails AKA whelks, and is commonly known as scungilli. Twins Pizza does a nice rendition and I'm sure Mike's and/or Angelo's could have it too.

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16 minutes ago, Bob Wells said:

Thayer St was my preferred hang too. I got my hair cut at Alba-Runci, worked part time at Thayer Market, spent untold hours browsing at College Hill Bookstore (motto: "Dedicated to the fine art of browsing"), scoured the used record stores etc etc.. It's still a fun area, but there are a lot more chains these days.

Growing up in Warwick I didn't spend as much time on Thayer Street. It was more of a special treat. Providence was so faaaaah.

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1 hour ago, dracisk said:

Growing up in Warwick I didn't spend as much time on Thayer Street. It was more of a special treat. Providence was so faaaaah.

LOL that's how we felt about going to the Warwick Mall! An all-day event. Thayer St and downtown were an easy bus ride for us. (Hope 42)

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When I was searching for a house to buy in CT, my base was at a hotel in Avon. I discovered one of the best pizzas I ever had at a small place called E&D Pizza at 200 W. Main St. in Avon. There's a liquor store next door so you can go back to your room with all you need for the evening. Their salads are pretty good too. 

Closer to me in Hamden, I like Olde World Apizza right next to Hamden in North Haven. Very much a New Haven style place. 

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Left the Bronx Monday morning and arrived at Matunuck just as they opened.  The place was packed immediately.  The reservation only provided you 75 minutes of sit-time, and the pace of service probably could get you out in 60 or less.  We did clams 5 ways, RI chowder, Littleneck & chorizo, clams casino, stuffie, and clams & linguine.  We also had a large caesar salad.  The kids decided they don't particularly like the RI style of chowder, or the stuffie, or clams casino.  They preferred the clams with white wine sauce.  I thought everything was delicious except for the overcooked pasta.  Solid seafood restaurant at a moderate price point - beats the crap out Salt Line, which is an imitation New England seafood restaurant.

Biomes is more or less a bust.  It's some fish tanks inside a warehouse building by the side of the road.  

Dinner was at Oberlin.  The menu is interesting, and I had to guess which dishes the kids would actually eat.  I whiffed on the first dish, Raw RI Scallops, Cherry Blossom Mayo, Sesame, Radish.  While I know they generally don't like raw seafood, I thought they wouldn't be able to resist fresh sweet scallops.  I had to eat almost the entire plate.  I fouled off a pitch with Brandade, Herbs, Grilled Country Bread.  I know they can handle salt cod, and they'll definitely eat the bread.  Hit a couple of line-drives with the pastas, Cacio e Pepe and Fregola Sarda, Rock Crab, Radicchio, Almond Bagnat Verd, Roasted Chicken Broth.  The pastas were thankfully al dente.  Lastly, Piri Piri Gnarly Vines Pheasant, Marinated Greens, Baby Potatoes, Papo Secos was a miss for everyone.  The kids thought the piri piri was too spicy and I thought the bird was overcooked and tough.  Oh yeah, dinner took 2 hours and that really tested the kids' stamina and patience.

Tuesday was spent in Newport.  I bought a membership to the Newport Preservation Society so we can skip the line for the Topiary Garden, the Breakers, Marble House and The Elm.  I downloaded the audio tour and made the kids listen to the highlights of each mansion.  After touring the mansions, we barely had time to take the cliff walk before heading back to Providence.  

Dinner was at Hemenway's.  They have a dress code for men so I wore jeans and a collared shirt.  But I saw other diners in shorts so the dress code isn't enforced, at least not during Summer.  

We started with a bowl of NE Chowder and Caesar Salad.   That was followed by the Assorted Hot Seafood Platter with fried calamari, scallops and bacon, and stuffies.  That was a gut busting amount of food.  Finally we had their paella with shrimp, scallops, swordfish, chourico, clams, mussels, pimentos, English peas, saffron rice.  All the seafood were seasoned well and properly cooked except for the swordfish chunks (they looked like tofu and were rather bland).  The place felt like a recipe driven restaurant without much creative energy.  

Wednesday was spent at the smallish zoo and then we took a gondola ride.  We also trekked to Brown/Thayer St. and Federal Hill.  We were quite tired and then it rained.  So rather than going back to Federal Hill, we went down the street from our hotel and ate Korean at Mokban.  It's Korean food but in a urban and hip setting.  Traditional noodle soups are labeled "ramen" to entice the ramen crowd.  I did enjoy their seafood pa jeon (pancake), made with small tender shrimp rather than squid.  It was a nice break after eating lots of seafood and Italian/American food.

Thursday morning we stopped by Modern Apizza partly because it has good reviews but mostly because it opens at 10:30 a.m.  We ordered a salad and a white clam pizza.  It's the best clam pizza I've ever had (but I haven't had many, Pete's Apizza sucked compared to this).  I think the kids didn't appreciate how hard it is to find a good clam pizza.

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Thanks for the report. It's interesting to see one's native state through an outsider's eye. I'm glad you enjoyed Matunuck Oyster Bar. I also dislike Rhode Island clam chowder. Why have clear broth when you can have cream (New England style)?? Maybe dislike is a strong word, but I'll always choose New England style.

Your description of Hemenway's (a recipe driven restaurant without much creative energy) was exactly my impression without having been there.

I can't believe RI has an urban, hip Korean restaurant!

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