Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have been waging a small campaign to give kids small apples rather than Halloween candy and it works very well.  Last year I handed out 75 kid sized galas and only one child refused.  I would overcome any moment of hesitation by assuring the goblin that the apple was juicier and sweeter than candy.  Here, bite.  S/he would and was amazed at how good and sweet and juicy the apple tasted.  Then the other kids would surge forward.

This works.  And you can reserve apples at any of your favorite orchards at your favorite farmers market.   Get a bushel or half bushel box and save a lot of money.  Kid sized galas or kids sized other apples are what you want.

The old razor in apple scare is an urban myth!   If you want to be fancy, you can stick a stick  into them and caramelize the apples but plain apples work fine and are so much better than supermarket apples.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, due to that urban myth, most children will not be allowed to consume the fruit unless the parent is with them and knows you.

We live in an unlit neighborhood and hand out glowstick bracelets as well as sugar bombs.  I'm still astonished how many of the kids are poorly lit; I used to accompany my kid and her friends in a flashing jellyfish costume to be sure they could be seen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely not my experience-- I did not know 95 percent of the kids -- nor their mothers. Every momthanked me!

Try it!

It is a silly myth-- how would you get a blade unseen into a unblemished apple? And if you were concerned, you could cut the apple into pieces.-- as easy as unwrapping candy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't make a scene but it would go in the trash as soon as we got home. I'm super picky about what apples we eat at home and from what growers and how they spray their trees. And there simply wouldn't be time to discover if the person handing them out knew any of those answers.

(I should also note that due to food allergies, we only keep one or two treats and then "trade" in the rest for cash or toys. And we usually hand out pretzels and playdough.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely not my experience-- I did not know 95 percent of the kids -- nor their mothers. Every momthanked me!

Try it!

It is a silly myth-- how would you get a blade unseen into a unblemished apple? And if you were concerned, you could cut the apple into pieces.-- as easy as unwrapping candy.

Razor blades are not the only thing that can go into an apple.  People are conditioned to the "don't eat things that aren't factory-wrapped" warning, especially since it comes from the police.  I personally think that the candy manufacturers are happy about this.  It also means no unwrapped cupcakes or cookies, not just fruit.

When I was a kid, there was a nice old lady who lived down the street (Mrs. McClellan, IIRC), and she would have the trick-or-treaters in for warm apple cider and homemade treats.  It was the only day of the year I ever saw her.  She put out quite a spread on her dining room table (with a lace tablecloth, if I'm not overly romanticizing).  The kids were polite (yes, we 70s kids were polite), but we were itching to get out of there and grab candy from the houses where they just wanted to give us Hershey bars and hustle us along.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say this as someone who is currently short on candy & long on apples (& I'm prepared to duck any incoming thrown apples), but it's Halloween, if the kids are going to dress up & walk around in the cold, give them chocolate & sugar. Yes, apples are better, but do you really want to be known as 'That House' ? (or maybe that's the brilliant plan)....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...