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mr food
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You are singing my song on this particular thread :lol:

For Steak and chili cuts, lamb, veal -- oh hell, just about everything that is hoofed (not horse, though) Eastern Market Union Butchers. They have hard-to-find and awesome skirt and hanger steaks that are vacu sealed.

For Pork also the meat counter down from Union at the Market (got a Latino name like Canales??)

For Dry aged Beef: Whole Foods in Clarendon

For lamb, veal (and good chicken): Lebanese Butchers, Falls Church

Wegmans is also good -- they carry Sunnyside Farms beef.

Edited by FunnyJohn
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I like Canales in Eastern Market. There is always a great looking cut or two of beef there. Be flexible about what you want-- you may be thinking NY Strip, but you may well walk out with ribeye. Also, the chicken vendors there have good organic free range birds.

If you're ever in Odenton MD, try a place called My Butcher and More. They don't have a huge selection, but I was impressed last weekend when I asked for a few pounds of ground chuck and they grabbed a steak out of the display case and ground it up right then and there.

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Snider's is my every day grocer and I do like it a lot. I find they occasionally has good deals and I love their store-made Italian sausage. Quality can be so-so.

Most of my meat purchasing is done at Whole Paycheck.

One of these days I have to get down to Eastern Market butcher.

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Wegmans is also good -- they carry Sunnyside Farms beef.

Wegman's has a huge markup on Sunnyside beef--you can buy directly from them at the Dupont Market on Sundays. Also Polyface pork--they're at the Arlington Market on Saturday mornings.

Another great place is Halalco in Falls Church for lamb, veal and goat, as well as beef and chicken. Very old world sort of place with excellent prices.

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Last night's dinner consisted of hanger steak I bought from Jill at Cheesetique. Cryovacked in about a 3.5 pound bag. First time I ever prepared it. Trimming it was a bit of a pain in the ass....non-butcher that I am....(except for the English language sometimes). Would love to find this cut already prepared for those "get home from work and want to throw that steak on the iron right away" moments.

As for quality, it was superb. The Mrs. pronounced it one of the best I've ever made! Add the Cheesetique meat selection to your list of quality supplies.

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Last night's dinner consisted of hanger steak I bought from Jill at Cheesetique.  Cryovacked in about a 3.5 pound bag.  First time I ever prepared it.  Trimming it was a bit of a pain in the ass....non-butcher that I am....(except for the English language sometimes).  Would love to find this cut already prepared for those "get home from work and want to throw that steak on the iron right away" moments.

As for quality, it was superb.  The Mrs. pronounced it one of the best I've ever made!  Add the Cheesetique meat selection to your list of quality supplies.

And this meat is never frozen, correct?

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I third or forth the Eastern Market suggestions. I personally prefer Union Meats, across from Mel's poultry and the flower shop. I have requested a specific cut and if they don't have they can usually get it in a day or two. Not to mention they do a great job sharpening knives.

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I usually get meat at Eastern Market (since I work @ a vendor there on Saturday mornings), but always am excited by the selection at Wegman's, too.

Does anyone else like to leave his or her beef (or venison or elk or antelope or horse or moose or [insert red meat]) in the fridge for several days until in turns dark, dark, red? I think it tastes fantastic that way.

Edited by tenunda
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Just wanted to start a thread that can be a shopping reference for meatatarians. Me, I use Laurel Meat Market. Gotta love a butcher shop with a big cow out front. The meat is top notch, though the rest of the store could use upgrades. They can get you anything you want, if you call in advance. Most of their meats come from PA Dutch country.

Where else to get great meat?

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Oliver's Meats 6th & Marion, Denver CO. Best butchers ever. Aged Prime.*

Failing a freezer full of their meaty perfection we tend to purchase the aged strips & rib eyes at Whole Food or the butcher's cuts from Union Meat at Easterm Market or when we splurge have a chat with Michael at Ray's. The meat from Sunnyside at Dupont FM is also quite nice. Wagshall's has left me unimpressed.

Where is the Laurel Meat Market?

*I once flew home with a 5 bone standing rib roast and my kind seat mate helped me hoist the carry-on containing said meat and cooling packs into the overhead. He was amused to find out that it was indeed not a ton of bricks but actually prime meat because he was a mucky-mucky that represented the nations largest cattle producers association.

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I think this might be the right topic, so here goes, and please don't laugh...Can you get a butcher to pound out the meat? Say a recipe calls for 1lb flank steak pounded to 1/4in thick? Can you just say that and pick it up?

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I went out to Halalco in Falls Church on Saturday and got in line at the butcher counter behind two women in burkas who were buying a whole baby goat. The butcher carried it out of the meat locker on his shoulder--the head was still on. The skin, ears and eyelids had been removed from the head, but the butcher proceeded to whack it off and set it aside.

I thought while I was there, I ought to get something that is difficult to find elsewhere. So I asked if he had any veal breast. He did, though when I asked him to bone it out for me, he twice tried to talk me out of buying veal, saying I should get beef instead because there is not enough meat on a veal breast. I was finally able to convince him that I knew what I wanted, and I ended up buying two, and had him trim them up and cut up the bones on the bandsaw so they'd fit better in the stockpot. It has been years since I've made a rolled, stuffed breast of veal.

A rainy day like today seemed like a good time to do it, and I browned the bones early this morning and had the stock going by 9 a.m. I made a filling for the veal out of fresh shiitakes, spinach and shallots with tarragon and lemon zest. Spent a lot of time taking off all the fat and silverskin, pounded the meat to flatten it a bit, rolled up and tied two separate rolls, wrapped them in cheesecloth and poached them in the strained stock.

This evening, I made a lemon-caper sauce by reducing some of the stock with chopped shallots, white wine and a little bit of champagne vinegar, then strained out the shallots, reduced it some more after adding creme fraiche then capers, lemon zest and finely chopped tarragon and parsley added at the end. When the meat roll is sliced, you get a pretty pinwheel effect, with the pinkish-beige meat and the line of green spinach. Served with Basmati rice, green beans and golden beets. And 2003 Adelsheim pinot noir.

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I went out to Halalco in Falls Church on Saturday and got in line at the butcher counter behind two women in burkas who were buying a whole baby goat. The butcher carried it out of the meat locker on his shoulder--the head was still on. The skin, ears and eyelids had been removed from the head, but the butcher proceeded to whack it off and set it aside.

I love the Lebanese Butcher around the corner from Halalco. They have fantastic kafta, pre-seasoned with minced onions and parsley for $2.50 a pound as well as some excellent spicy link sausages that I can't remember the name of. I actually just returned from there with some really beautiful boneless chunks of lamb for a curry recipe from Monica's cookbook. I arrived shortly before they closed, so all the meat was in the meat locker for the night. It didn't take them very long to perform their artistry on a leg of lamb for me and the meat I brought home looks great. These guys are so nice and friendly!

I was in there earlier this year and a couple of Greeks were there buying lamb for a party. They got a whole lamb, weighed on the scale looking very much like your baby goat, as well as two whole racks and two extra legs. Must have been some party.

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I don't recall anyone on the forum mentioning this place before, which I stumbled on today, well not really. I drove on an unfamiliar route, saw it, and went in to check it out.

It is called The ORGANIC BUTCHER of Mclean (6712 Old Dominion Dr.) across the road, sort of, from the McLean Balducci's. It's only been open since November.

Well, to those like me who were bemoaning the loss of locally raised, fresh organic beef with Sunnyside Organics getting out of the Wagyu business, weep no more. The proprietor, Don, gets whole carcasses from local (at least one is in Loudon Co.) organic farms, and cuts the meat himself. He's got dry-aged Angus beef -- no super bargains, which is to be expected. But given the quality of the product, his prices seem fair. He also has veal and pork--beautiful, thick-sliced veal liver for $6.99 a pound. I bought some big, meaty short ribs for $6.99 a pound. More expensive than Eastern Market, but these are dry-aged, which Don says will make a difference in taste even in a braised dish. He has also offered to save tri-tips for me, if I call a day in advance.

Other than meat, he sells fish and a few things that are quite special--Strauss Family Dairy cultured butter, from Northern California, and Cowgirl Creamery cheeses, which won't be hard to get once their new store opens, but are right now. He also has a small selection of wines and other gourmet products.

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Springfield Butchers

Bland Street

Springfield, VA 703 245-0111

great butcher shop, have cut crown roast of pork, crown of lamb (anyone see a pattern here?), special cuts for parties...etc...extremely good but call ahead because on the weekends, even if you get there an hour before they open there is a line waiting.

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Any suggestions on where to buy a pig? A whole pig, that is, in the 60 pound range, and fresh, not frozen. Northern Virginia preferred (Falls Church area would be great, but I'm not holding my breath). I'm planning a pig roast this spring, and perhaps others if the first goes well.

Good brining recipes would also be welcome :lol:

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Any suggestions on where to buy a pig? A whole pig, that is, in the 60 pound range, and fresh, not frozen. Northern Virginia preferred (Falls Church area would be great, but I'm not holding my breath). I'm planning a pig roast this spring, and perhaps others if the first goes well.

Good brining recipes would also be welcome  :lol:

Don't want to seem to be pushing Springfield Butchers but I think if you give them a call they can get you anything from a suckling pig to something big enough to require 24 hours of roasting over an open pit...

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Don't want to seem to be pushing Springfield Butchers but I think if you give them a call they can get you anything from a suckling pig to something big enough to require 24 hours of roasting over an open pit...

OK, I'll give them a try. Thanks!

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Don't want to seem to be pushing Springfield Butchers but I think if you give them a call they can get you anything from a suckling pig to something big enough to require 24 hours of roasting over an open pit...

The recommendation was three months ago, but the pig roast was yesterday. I'm pleased to report that Springfield Butchers were very easy to do business with, and provided a very nice 67.5 pound pig. I suspect that I can do better on price at one of the various Latin or Asian markets, but since I didn't have the time to do proper research on the quality of both product and service at my local markets (time on the calendar, yes, in my schedule, no), this was a simple and stress-free alternative. Thanks!

Now I just need to find some decent bread to make Cuban sandwiches out of the leftovers...

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Dude, where was my invite?  :)

It was my mother's retirement party, so family and her friends only. With 55+ people, we were worried about reaching our maximum capacity, although in hindsight it looks like we can handle more. Next round with our friends will be June or July. We'll give you plenty of advance notice. It will be better next time anyway - this was my first attempt, and it was very good, but there's room for improvement. I need to work on my marinade.

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I need to work on my marinade.

Nothing better for that than a bone-in, skin-on shoulder. Brined, then roasted in the oven. - The Dean and DeLuca cookbook has a pretty good recipe if I recall correctly. That being said, where can I get a shoulder as decribed above in the city? Preferrably metro-accessible - don't own a car.

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Nothing better for that than a bone-in, skin-on shoulder.  Brined, then roasted in the oven. - The Dean and DeLuca cookbook has a pretty good recipe if I recall correctly.  That being said, where can I get a shoulder as decribed above in the city?  Preferrably metro-accessible - don't own a car.

Your location says Courthouse. I wonder if there is a Shopper's near you as that is where I get mine.

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Nothing better for that than a bone-in, skin-on shoulder.  Brined, then roasted in the oven. - The Dean and DeLuca cookbook has a pretty good recipe if I recall correctly.  That being said, where can I get a shoulder as decribed above in the city?  Preferrably metro-accessible - don't own a car.

The odd thing is, I roasted both a whole pig and a shoulder (when the guest list grew well beyond initial estimates), and the shoulder picked up a lot more of the flavor of the marinade and rub than the pig did. The balance of flavors was right, it's the intensity that was lacking.

I picked up a very nice pork shoulder, bone-in, skin-on, with exactly the right amount of fat, at Grand Mart. I don't think there are any in the city, unfortunately - Maryland and Virginia only.

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Hi Jake. How goes the wine biz? I visited the Laurel Meat Market last Friday and noticed they were selling a variety of buffalo cuts including buffalo flank steak. I may grill some this weekend.

Jay

Laurel Meat Market is my go to place primarily because not only do they have good stuff, but I live in Laurel, too. More difficult to find meats I have to usually go to Whole Paycheck (great nickname for that joint, whoever came up with that). But this thread is an inspiration to check out some other local meat purveyors.

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Fajita fans, all natural skirt steak is on sale this week (or at least it was this AM) at P Street Whole Foods for $6.99/lb.

I think you can get skirt steak at most lLatin markets for less than half that (is the premium for "all natural?"). Just ask Waitman how much they are selling if for at the place near him.

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I think you can get skirt steak at most lLatin markets for less than half that (is the premium for "all natural?"). Just ask Waitman how much they are selling if for at the place near him.

I'm sure the "all natural" gives it a premium price compared to latino markets. But, that's what I look for. (All natural. Not premium price! :) ) Same reason I get the hanger steak from Jill at Cheesetique rather than the hanging tender at Grand Mart.

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I'm sure the "all natural" gives it a premium price compared to latino markets. But, that's what I look for. (All natural. Not premium price! :) ) Same reason I get the hanger steak from Jill at Cheesetique rather than the hanging tender at Grand Mart.

But I sort of like the extra tanginess that the hormane-laden feed gives to the flavor of the un-natural types.

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Does anyone know which of the butchers mentioned in this thread also sell the more offbeat products that independent butchers often carry?

I'm thinking of stuff like veal bones, beef leg bones (run through a band saw on request), and chicken backs and necks. Basically, cheap stuff that's good for stocks, stews, and roasting, but doesn't cost much and is generally cut to order with an onsite band saw.

My experience has been that supermarket (even those with butcher counters) generally have no interest in carrying this stuff. Does anyone know who does and who doesn't carry this kind of thing?

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Does anyone know which of the butchers mentioned in this thread also sell the more offbeat products that independent butchers often carry?

I'm thinking of stuff like veal bones, beef leg bones (run through a band saw on request), and chicken backs and necks. Basically, cheap stuff that's good for stocks, stews, and roasting, but doesn't cost much and is generally cut to order with an onsite band saw.

My experience has been that supermarket (even those with butcher counters) generally have no interest in carrying this stuff. Does anyone know who does and who doesn't carry this kind of thing?

See my post about Springfield Butchers some where back there. They are a true butcher shop and will cut almost anything in any way you want it...(like crown of lamb that we had for Thanksgiving last year)..
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Wagshal's has these fantastic looking prime "Kansas City" Strips for $24.99/lb-- absolutely amazing looking marbling.
I can attest that these are amazing tasting! Got one for my husband's birthday last night and we both agreed it was the best steak we have ever eaten at home.
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chicken backs and necks

I don't think I've seen necks there, but the Tenleytown Whole Foods often has backs. I don't remember what the price has been recently, but I do remember remarking to myself "wow, that's expensive for chicken backs". As has been discussed on the Stewing Fowl thread, you can get stewing fowl at Latino markets (such as Bestway in Mt. Pleasant and elsewhere), and not only are they not very expensive, they're much better for stock than the backs and necks of fryers.

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If you're ever in Odenton MD, try a place called My Butcher and More.

Hearty second to that recommendation. Yesterday, we picked up two Prime bone-in ribeyes (16.99/lb) and a Prime strip (27.99/lb) there. Cut as we waited and to our size requests, the aged steaks were absolutely superior. Our 12 yo son devoured the 12 oz. strip and we had the ribeyes, each over a pound with the bone. The "Cowboy" ribeye may just be my new favorite cut, topping the NY strip. I think my wife and I will get both next time and switch at half-time.

I would disagree with a previous comment re. small selection. While display case is small, they've got it all in the back or by special order, from hanger, tri-tip, chateaubriand, Colorado lamb, veal, pork, salmon, tuna, sausages, etc. to ostrich, Wagyu beef, whole suckling pigs and lambs, pate, caviar, whole aged beef brisket, Long Island duck, So MD stuffed ham and, for the holidays, Turducken! I asked where their baby back ribs came from, and the butcher on duty said Denmark, so nothing unusual there, as it seems the majority of baby backs sold around here are Danish.

Technically in Gambrills, just east of Crofton and west of Annapolis, its at the corner of 450 and 424, about 2.5 miles north of Rt 50 on 424.

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I don't think I've seen necks there, but the Tenleytown Whole Foods often has backs. I don't remember what the price has been recently, but I do remember remarking to myself "wow, that's expensive for chicken backs". As has been discussed on the Stewing Fowl thread, you can get stewing fowl at Latino markets (such as Bestway in Mt. Pleasant and elsewhere), and not only are they not very expensive, they're much better for stock than the backs and necks of fryers.

I got some frozen chicken back/necks at whole foods when I made stock a couple of weeks ago. I think it was either .99 a pound or 1.99 a pound. I was buying a bunch of other stuff and can't remember exactly. They also had some beef bones for stewing also but it was in the frozen section not in the refrigerated section. Like with the frozen turkeys and pre-made frozen hamburgers and stuff. Also I have found with Whole Foods (at least the one in SS that if you call over a day or two advance they can usually save whatever you want or cut anything you want.

A different question, has anyone seen hanger or onglet steak around? I have seen skirt at whole foods but the hanger is actually a different section of the diaphragm I thought. Are they just labeling it "skirt" in stores? I actually tried laurel once or twice but they were always out (only one or two hanger steaks per cow I think he said so it goes quick) Whole foods skirt steak is ridiculous at 14.99 a pound (same as strip and ribeye is actually cheaper) so I am looking elsewhere.

And another thing I have seen a couple of links on here to meat cut guides and just wanted to add that I have always used wikipedia. Really good descriptions.

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