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Peking Gourmet Inn, Falls Church - Owner Eddie Tsui's 1980s-1990s-Era Northern Chinese-American Kitsch with $43 Peking Duck and Homegrown Jumbo Spring Onions in Baileys Crossroads


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'qwertyy said:

Yesterday's chat is here.

I was interested in the post about the downfall of City Lights/Meiwah; I'll add Chen's for the trifecta. I live in the area and have had so much middling Chinese delivery lately it's not even funny. Have any of you heard of the restaurant recommended as an alternative--Peking Gourmet Inn? Or can you recommend any standout dishes at other neighborhood places?

Peking Gourmet Inn is out in Falls Church/Bailey's Crossroads. IIRC It was a favorite of Pres. Bush (41). I have mostly had lunch specials there, which are usually not too bad. The Kung Pao is not too oily and not overly sauced. We do carryout for lunch from there fairly oftent - Some of my coworker's favorites include the Szechuan Beef Proper, Jade Chicken, and Fresh Garlic Chicken.

Based on my semi-recent meals at both City Lights and Meiwah (neither one was very good - City Lights was horrible), Peking Gourmet is the better choice. That being said, I prefer Full Kee (Bailey's Crossroads location).

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I believe that the Peking Duck is one of the best you will find anywhere in this area, and rivals some of the best I have ever eaten. I also like the aforementioned Szechuan Beef Proper and Kung Pao chicken which is nothing like what is available most other Chinese restuarants.

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I have to add that I've been going here for 20 years and I think it is the best in the area. It only took me 11 years to get my picture on the wall :) Actually my mom and I have a tradition of having Christmas dinner there for the last 17 years. Their Peking Duck is unrivaled, hands down the best in the area. Their basic white rice has the nice little addition off egg and peas, simple yet good. they also have a great Shrimp dish called Jeo-yen-shrimp which I recommend you try. Service is always pleasent and professional and the food is always good. The carry-out is the best in the area, hand- down. It's no hole in the wall like most chines places in the area, and the prices reflect the quality. Peking Duck is $36.00/Kung Pao Shrimp is $16.95/Pork Peking Style-awesome shedded pork,bamboo shoots,spicy garlic sauce,-$12.95 But I believe that you get what you pay for. I love this place and Peter Chang will not be coming here any time soon :angry:

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I've been a few times for lunch and I've really enjoyed it. Their lunch prices are really reasonable, IMO. I haven't tried the Peking Duck, but I have had the chicken with garlic that they grow themselves.

I've been to Full Kee once, and I really liked Peking Gourmet Inn better.

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I've been a few times for lunch and I've really enjoyed it. Their lunch prices are really reasonable, IMO. I haven't tried the Peking Duck, but I have had the chicken with garlic that they grow themselves.

I've been to Full Kee once, and I really liked Peking Gourmet Inn better.

I think that they are two very different styles of restaurants. Peking Gourmet Inn is not as loud, rushed, and does not feel nearly as cramped (even though they wedge as many people as the Fire Marshal will allow them to). Also the food is much different. The strength of Full Kee is the soups, I have been unimpressed by most of the other dishes. Peking Gourmet food is more refined, and I cannot say enough about the Peking Duck. Given a choice between the two I would always pick Peking Gourmet, but I would never try to compare them.

As an aside, two weeks ago today my beloved dog had surgery to repair her right knee after a total rupture of the ligament, the wife and I could not stand being at home without her, so we escaped into an order of the spring rolls and Peking duck. They make the spring rolls on site, so they have more flavor than those that most Chinese restaurants serve. And for the little while that we spent filling pancakes with the crispy savory duck we were able to put aside our worries about our little one. On the way back from the vet the next day she snarffed down the fortune cookies.

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I don't understand the Beef Proper. I had it once with my family and both my parents, my husband and I, and my brother thought it was really odd. It was deep fried little strips of beef with a sweet bit of glaze, but the beef was so dry and stringy that you couldn't help but think of beef jerky. My favorite dish there was the black pepper shrimp, which was huge platter of jumbo shrimp very lightly dusted in flour, fried/sauteed, and finished off with an addictively good, not too spicy dark sauce. I can't remember what else we ordered that day but the best and worst stood out in my memory.

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The beef proper used to be our reason for heading out to Peking Gourmet. Weused to call it cowboy candy because it was beefy and sweet, with a hint of hot from the chili. I haven't been in ages now that I live in MD, but now I think I need to make a trip over there. Hmmm.... cowboy candy.

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I've been to Peking Gourmet Inn many times over the years, and have enjoyed it in the past. Fairly recently, I went to a large Sunday lunch banquet where I was firmly disappointed in everything except the Peking Duck (and the company). The biggest problem was the saucing, which was excessively thick and sweet.

'If they want to serve up that glop, then by golly I'll go straight to the heart of it,' I thought to myself today. I went online to their Lunch Specials, and ordered a Shrimp Chow Mein with Egg Drop Soup.

Now, I didn't see anything that said "Monday through Friday" (someone please correct me if I'm missing it), so I was expecting to pay $8.95 for both, and also get an egg roll. It was not to be - the chow mein was $8.95 and the egg drop soup was $2.89, and no egg roll was included. For whatever reason, those prices are inclusive of tax, and the total bill was $11.84.

But guess what? Everything was good, including the homemade chow mein noodles and the rice with little peas in it. The soup was just like it should be, and the shrimp chow mein wasn't gloppy in the least. Within the genre, both of these dishes were successful, and I'd order them again.

Cheers,

Rocks

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I've been to Peking Gourmet Inn many times over the years, and have enjoyed it in the past. Fairly recently, I went to a large Sunday lunch banquet where I was firmly disappointed in everything except the Peking Duck (and the company).

Did they serve sliced cucumbers to go with the duck? We used to have cucumbers along side with the scallions as kids and had asked for it in the past, but didn't have it. I think around last year or so, they started serving it for charge ($3?). It add another element of taste and texture. Try it next time!

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Did they serve sliced cucumbers to go with the duck? We used to have cucumbers along side with the scallions as kids and had asked for it in the past, but didn't have it. I think around last year or so, they started serving it for charge ($3?). It add another element of taste and texture. Try it next time!

You're testing my memory here - when I say "Fairly recently," I mean early February. But you know what? They did serve the cucumber. It was a big roundtable, and I'm not sure whether it was a supplement or not, but I do remember thinking it added something in terms of texture.

Cheers,

Rocks.

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Welcome, El Barto. There was a Chinese chef here, Peter Chang, who was a master of Sichuan cuisine, and developed a bit of a cult following. He moved from restaurant to restaurant frequently, from China Star to TemptAsian cafe to a new place over in Fairfax. His cooking was a revelation with whole new flavor combinations. Shortly after he opened that place in Fairfax, he disappeared for a while. Intrepid researchers found he had gone to Atlanta, GA, and then to Knoxville, TN, where he is now.

Link: Peter Chang has been found!

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Welcome, El Barto. There was a Chinese chef here, Peter Chang, who was a master of Sichuan cuisine, and developed a bit of a cult following. He moved from restaurant to restaurant frequently, from China Star to TemptAsian cafe to a new place over in Fairfax. His cooking was a revelation with whole new flavor combinations. Shortly after he opened that place in Fairfax, he disappeared for a while. Intrepid researchers found he had gone to Atlanta, GA, and then to Knoxville, TN, where he is now.

Link: Peter Chang has been found!

Jim, an excellent précis. I would add that before he burst onto the scene here, he cooked for the Chinese Prime Minister, a top hotel in Beijing, and then the Chinese ambassador to Washington. And the excitement we experienced as he jumped from one restaurant to another in NOVA was beyond cultism, it was fanaticism -- American boisterousness, perhaps. Sometimes, after we'd tasted his wares we would demand that he come out of the kitchen for a curtain call. He hated that. After a smile and a bow, he escaped as soon as possible. One of our group, "pandahugga," complimented him in Mandarin, and that was even worse. Like many geniuses he just wanted to be left alone to do his work. According to press accounts, the same thing happened in Atlanta. I don't know if he's found a more comfortable environment in Knoxville. But if he ever comes back here we'll try to restrain our enthusiasm, at least on the surface.

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Duck now $39, still great. Those of you who are broth-inclined, ask them to box up your duck carcass (else it goes into the stock for their hot and sour soup, which is the ne plus ultra of that genre, for what it's worth). Not much else to recommend in particular.

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Duck now $39, still great. Those of you who are broth-inclined, ask them to box up your duck carcass (else it goes into the stock for their hot and sour soup, which is the ne plus ultra of that genre, for what it's worth). Not much else to recommend in particular.

The hot and sour soup tip is actually worth a lot (to me) because I love hot and sour soup in theory, but never think to order it because I never know what's in it. (What is in it besides corn starch, water, and vinegar? What gives it its brown color?) Hmm, now I'm craving it with fried wonton strips thrown into the bowl.

From my own few (semi-)recent experiences, I also agree that the duck itself is (still) really good and everything else I've tried is really bad - even the "grown in our back yard" garlic sprouts or whatever they are.

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The hot and sour soup tip is actually worth a lot (to me) because I love hot and sour soup in theory, but never think to order it because I never know what's in it. (What is in it besides corn starch, water, and vinegar? What gives it its brown color?) Hmm, now I'm craving it with fried wonton strips thrown into the bowl.

From my own few (semi-)recent experiences, I also agree that the duck itself is (still) really good and everything else I've tried is really bad - even the "grown in our back yard" garlic sprouts or whatever they are.

I've found myself there for weekend lunches twice in the past month or two and had the opposite experience. To level set, I've been coming here for the better part of a decade and view it as a very good example of an Americanized Chinese family restaurant. I never expect to be blown away but it's been a very solid place to take visiting relatives or just grab something quick and easy with the family. It's moderately consistent in execution though I do just about always order the same things.

Both visits I've ordered the Black Pepper Beef. Chunks of steak with onions and red peppers in a peppery but not particularly spicy, thin sauce. Good, flavorful crust and a decent amount of fat to keep the beef moist when cooked to medium - well. The use of chunks of steak, cooking them shy of well, and the lack of corn starch separate this from the versions I've gotten for about the same price from a large number of similar restaurants. On the first (recent) visit my wife had the chicken with the onions from their farm. It was probably the closest this place has come to really surprising me. It was simple and very good. The chicken was properly cooked (thigh meat if I recall), the onions were flavorful, and probably most importantly, it was not oversauced. One detraction, it was a bit too oily. Second visit they were out of the onions so the wife went with another dish I've had countless times, scallops with roasted garlic. Scallops were lightly breaded and cooked to just done. In the past, they've definitely overdone these so it was a nice treat to see them just about perfect. This was accompanied by the combination lo mein. Pork, beef, chicken, and shrimp with large soft noodles. I like the noodles in their lo mein, very good for this type of place and the meat was plentiful enough that I didn't have two kids fighting over the last piece of [X].

Service was professional and prompt both times .

As for the hot and sour soup, I did not order it either time due to the weather but I've had their version many times. It is one item I would definitely say has declined but it remains meatier and more flavorful than most. Sadly it has gotten gloppier and duller over the years but I still view it as above average.

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As for the hot and sour soup, I did not order it either time due to the weather but I've had their version many times. It is one item I would definitely say has declined but it remains meatier and more flavorful than most. Sadly it has gotten gloppier and duller over the years but I still view it as above average.

I would also agree with that.

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I would also agree with that.

I love Peking Gourmet. The duck is the best. The H&S soup is the best. Years ago, then prez George the first sauntered by our table and remarked that the crispy beef was his favorite too. The owners care about the place and the food is worth the trip. At least for me.

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I have only been there four times. Three out of four, the duck was very good. The other time, the skin was flabby and the fat was not rendered out. Other than that, no complaints. I also like the crispy beef. Can't speak to the hot and sour soup since I don't usually order that at any restaurant. The service was always gracious.

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I was there for Saturday dinner for the second time. As someone was celebrating her birthday, she splurged on the Peking Duck which she very much enjoyed at the forty dollar price. I had the dish with lots of noodles with chicken, beef, and shrimp which is advertised on the menu as having a large portion. What I took home shoud make three meals. The hot and sour soup was one of the best in the area.

The place, a favorite of the first President Bush, was quite crowded and obviusly is reaping the benefits of success, looking like it started small in a nondescript shopping center and now being fairlly large. The service is fine and the owners circulate to see how you are doing.

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Saturday was my brother-in-law's birthday and Peking Gourmet Inn is his favorite restaurant. My husband insists that I have been there before with him and his family- usually I disagree and then acquiesce that it may be true.  I am now 100% confident that before Saturday night I had never been there before. The place is a nightmarish circus of kitsch and I would have remembered being there. Peking Gourmet Inn represents everything that I hate about mediocre yet inexplicably popular restaurants that are past their prime. I still haven't found anyone who can explain what Peking Celery is.

For starters at 7:30 pm the place was packed and there was a line of people waiting out the door. The menu is a totally unironic throwback to the Chinese food and tropical tiki drinks of the 1970s. If executed well it could be endearing. But it wasn't. We got a massive eye roll from our waitress when she saw we had brought our own bottle of wine- a 2010 Herman Weimer HJW Dry Riesling that was the lone bright spot in a meal that was otherwise a total waste of calories- and told us we'd have to wait to open it since they had (no joke) run out of wine glasses. We obviously got the Peking Duck and it was a middle of the road version. Aside from being able to observe what is clearly expert carving skills, the best part were the fatty leg bits from the carcass that the server left on the table.  They really loved consolidating our serving plates during the very rushed service- there is something really welcoming and appetizing about watching your server dump food from one plate on your table onto another. I will say that I did enjoy the cold, pickled Sezchuan cabbage- there was no spice to speak of, just sweetness and acid.  It reminded me of something my Yiddish speaking grandmother made from a recipe her mother had brought to the US from the Shtetl.  Everything else we ordered was utterly unremarkable except for the Peking Gourmet Chicken which was greasy and virtually inedible unless dipped in their special secret garlic sauce- basically some kind of cornstarch thickened sugary garlic glop.

I never need to go back. When I am forced to I will stick to a liquid meal of the flaming volcano or the drink that comes in a parrot shaped vessel topped with pineapple.

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I never need to go back. When I am forced to I will stick to a liquid meal of the flaming volcano or the drink that comes in a parrot shaped vessel topped with pineapple.

Painful to read, lekkerwijn, but needed to be said.

I used to say there were two choices at Peking Gourmet Inn: Peking Duck, and glop; the last time I went, the Peking Duck was glop, too, so where does that leave us?

Thanks for your honesty. There was no malice to your post at all, and your disappointment was palpable.

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We obviously got the Peking Duck and it was a middle of the road version. 

I agree with most of what lekkerwijin says.  Yes, a reservation is only an invitation to stand in line and the crowds are unbearable.  Yes, the service is awful.  Yes, most of the food is "mall Chinese" at best.  But if there's a better version of Peking Duck readily available in town, then please share the secret and spare the rest of us from ever having to go back here again.

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I haven't been there for about six-months but I do recommend the so-called Gourmet Pan-Fried Noodles which have noodles, of course, with the addition of beef, pork, chicken, and shrimp.  The dish costs $25, but the secret is to eat your normal portion and take the rest home.  I found that there was enough for three additional meals.  The hot and sour soup is worth a taste also.

Having actually eaten Peking Duck in Beijing, I stay away from a place that serves it on an assembly line basis.

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I saw a documentary on Peking Duck and how they served it in the Olympic Village during the Beijing Olympics.  Anyway, it was enough for me to crave some for my birthday so off we went to the supposed mecca, Peking Gourmet.  My husband and I were both disappointed.  We like duck fat and they basically cut all that away before serving as well as pressed the duck meat so that the juices would be absorbed in the paper towel or cloth, I forgot.  The skin was cold.  The result being a boring, dry-ish duck.  It was a Saturday night and the place was a mad-house and I am puzzled by its perennial appeal.  Like schulju, I would like a good Peking Duck restaurant identified in time for my next birthday meal (in January).

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Painful to read, lekkerwijn, but needed to be said.

I used to say there were two choices at Peking Gourmet Inn: Peking Duck, and glop; the last time I went, the Peking Duck was glop, too, so where does that leave us?

Thanks for your honesty. There was no malice to your post at all, and your disappointment was palpable.

I'm not sure I can agree with the comment about glop and as far as my handful of experiences this year go, I could probably just repost exactly what I said a few posts above in 2011.  I will add that the Lamb with Spring Onions is a solid, but oily option.

It is by no means a special occasion restaurant and the frustration expressed in the post above is certainly valid.  However, I think things have gone too far towards the negative in the recent flurry of activity.  In my quite humble opinion, it remains the best Americanized Chinese restaurant to which I can haul my family.  If there is a better one in Arlington, I would love to hear about it.

I agree with most of what lekkerwijin says.  Yes, a reservation is only an invitation to stand in line and the crowds are unbearable.  Yes, the service is awful.  Yes, most of the food is "mall Chinese" at best.  But if there's a better version of Peking Duck readily available in town, then please share the secret and spare the rest of us from ever having to go back here again

I want to eat at the malls you visit :D

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I tried Peking duck for the first time last night. This past week there was a lot of chatter about duck and since I didn't have any experience, I asked a friend for a recommendation. He was very quick to recommend Peking Gourmet Inn in Seven Corners so we made reservations for Sunday night and on we went. I felt like I traveled back in time as I walk through their narrow corridor to be greeted by their very busy and efficient hosts. As we walk to their dining room, time travel continued. It was an interesting change (in a positive way) from the modern spaces that I have gotten used to by dining in DC establishments. From the uniforms of the serving staff to white-clothed tables to walls filled with pictures, I was impressed with the production value of the front of the house staff. I could nitpick my server or the tight space of the table in middle of the floor, but observing the genuine effort of the staff and the amazing volume they were hosting on a Sunday night, I was really impressed rather than stressed. Since I am not familiar with the cuisine, I glazed over the menu and ordered fried dumplings and a duck. I enjoyed the duck show: they brought out the duck and cut everything out table side. As a Turk, the premise of rolling meat in bread with onions is a wining combination, so I enjoyed my first Peking duck experience. The sauce was really sweet but since I`m not familiar with the details of the cuisine, I can't say it was accurate or not. Overall, I would go back for the duck, although I`m not loyalty struck to this location, if I discover a place closer to RFK (my home ground) I would probably go there. 

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Duck and Garlic Sprouts, and strong tiki drinks.  The staff is very polite and always makes a fuss over grandma when I take her.

unless you are going on week day or early you probably want reservations.

Thanks for providing a smile. "Peking Duck" was one of my grandma's favorite spots. We enjoyed many a lunch there, with her dish of choice being the Cashew Chicken. I always liked the Kung Pao chicken, not at all greasy and with a little kick.

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So where is the good chinese food in this part of Northern VA?  Seems like there's a lot of strong negative feelings about this place, but not much positive info on better places nearby.  Sure, as on most americanized-chinese menus, if you order glop here, that's what you'll get.  But there are a few winners on the menu that you might not find at "mall chinese" places:  For example, try any of the lamb dishes, the Juo-yen shrimp, or something with garlic sprouts.  Occasionally, there are seasonal specials featuring produce from the owners' farm.  And while it may not be the best Peking Duck in town, it's consistently better than what's usually available at the neighborhood take-away.  Mark's duck may in fact be arguably better, but the rest of Mark's menu isn't much to get excited about.  Often can't get in to HK Palace, or not in the mood for spicy oily whatever. 

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It can be, depending on when you go and who you're with.

I use to be a regular visitor and go with a friend who went quite frequently. When the waiters would see you on a regular basis, the cuts for the duck would be better. Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't the duck ~$30 like ten years ago? Remember a few dinners with a full table of six and we would order six ducks.

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Power of persuasion caused me to get a duck here last weekend and I very much enjoyed the food and experience. 

I am not special and my duck probably wasn't either but I still loved it.  What's to write? It was a fatty duck with succelent juicy meat served with the usual accompaniments.  The pancakes seemed home-made as they were not all the same size/shape and were a bit thicker than usual take-out. Oh, we ordered HALF a duck ($22)

We enjoyed the $3.50 celery appetizer.  Yes, you read that price right. I enjoyed it so much that am going to try to recreate it.  It's slightly cooked celery in a sesame oil and weak soy sauce (I think) served warm.

The shrimp pot stickers were good too"¦very shrimpy and tiny. Little one biters. ($8)

My husband ordered a humbled bastard or a pissed off bastard or something like that. Basically rum, some more rum and a blue plastic cup. Terrible unless you like rum over ice. ($8)

It's an entertaining experience in my opinion and the food is good. (all prices quoted above are from memory, not ticket).

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The drink is "Suffering Bastard"  Though when we get tiki drinks at Peking Gourmet they are usually in tiki glasses

Originally was 1 oz gin  1 oz brandy  1/2 oz Rose's Lime Juice Cordial  2 dashes Angostura Bitters   4 oz ginger beer (chilled)

but now more often found made with rum  2 parts Light Rum   2 parts Gin  2 parts Ginger Ale  1 part Lime Juice  2 dash bitters

OH how I miss Hala Kahiki in Chicago

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Does anyone know what the "garlic sprouts" are at Peking Gourmet Inn? I'd love to grow those things, but I've never seen seeds or plants called garlic sprouts.

I'd also love to know what "their farm" is - I first went here in the 1980s, and to the best of my recollection, it's the only item I've ever seen on the menu that was from "their farm."

I'm assuming it's a backyard garden, and there's nothing wrong with that at all, but this has gotten a lot of play over the decades.

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Does anyone know what the "garlic sprouts" are at Peking Gourmet Inn? I'd love to grow those things, but I've never seen seeds or plants called garlic sprouts.

I would assume garlic sprouts are the sprouts from a garlic plant if you let it sprout.  Or the shoots so to speak.  Like the green of a green onion.

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No, it's something different. I grow garlic, and while you cut off the scape (a solid, round stalk that eventually produces seeds) to conserve energy to the bulbs, it's not the think they serve at PKI. Neither are the actual leaves of the garlic (bulb) plant.

They used to (and maybe still do) have a write up of their farm and the sprouts in the hallway before you got to the reception desk. The one thing I remember from reading it said they were "grown in the absence of light"

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No, it's something different. I grow garlic, and while you cut off the scape (a solid, round stalk that eventually produces seeds) to conserve energy to the bulbs, it's not the think they serve at PKI. Neither are the actual leaves of the garlic (bulb) plant.

They used to (and maybe still do) have a write up of their farm and the sprouts in the hallway before you got to the reception desk. The one thing I remember from reading it said they were "grown in the absence of light"

Found this:

"Growing Garlic Sprouts" on sproutpeople.org
 

And if you read the garlic chives thread here I think that might be it?

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Thanks Kate, but I think those are something different too, although they look pretty cool!

The garlic sprouts seem to be a combination of regular chives, garlic chives and maybe something else.  They're mostly round like chives, but much thicker and solid, not hollow in the middle, but they also flatten out a bit at the tops like garlic chives do (at least I think they do, it's been a while since I've had them).  They are also much lighter colored than either, with lots of white parts and some light green parts.  I'm guessing that the "grown in the absence of light" feature is the reason for the white color (like white asparagus).

Here's what the google brings up:  garlic sprouts peking gourmet inn

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I'd also love to know what "their farm" is - I first went here in the 1980s, and to the best of my recollection, it's the only item I've ever seen on the menu that was from "their farm."

I'm assuming it's a backyard garden, and there's nothing wrong with that at all, but this has gotten a lot of play over the decades.

I remember reading something, that there is a small farm nearby (I think, but may be wrong, that it's the one on Annandale Road, east of Graham, in the Sleepy Hollow area), and that they also have a larger tract of land out in the Centreville area.

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