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Star Trek: The Next Generation - Season 2

12. "The Royale" - March 27, 1989 - post-2-0-86872500-1447528193_thumb.png <-- "There is a certain degree of random fortune involved - I believe that is why they call it 'gambling.'"

Directed by Cliff Bole, Written by Tracy Tormé (as Keith Mills), startrek.com

[Note: -291 Celsius? Not possible, at least not in the universe we know. You know what's interesting? There's something special about the number "18" when converting Celsius-to-Farenheit (10 degrees Celsius is 18 degrees Farenheit), and the difference between -291 and -273 degrees (i.e., Absolute Zero) is exactly 18 degrees Celsius off. I believe the writers got confused by 10 degrees, and also somehow crossed-up Farenheit and Celsius, hence, the 18-degree discrepancy. Also, Fermat's Last Theorem has been (theoretically, and maybe kinda-sorta) proven which is pretty remarkable considering the writers probably didn't think it would be.

If you want to read interesting, thoughtful reviews of both TOS and TNG, go to Zack Hendlen's writings on avclub.com. I don't always 100%-agree with Zack, but his reviews are always thoughtful, and always interesting reading - the Star Trek blogosphere is much better off because of him and his writing.]

Ironically, there are two errors associated with cold temperatures in "The Royale":

In the soft opening, the Enterprise beams aboard a fragment from space, then O'Brien and Ryker lift it and turn it towards Picard. Given that it's some type of metal, and was orbiting the planet, wouldn't it be something approaching absolute zero in temperature?

post-2-0-38497100-1445188754_thumb.png

This is subtle, but hilarious:

Ryker: "Looks like the poor devil died in his sleep."

Worf <back towards camera, softly and somberly>: "What a terrible way to die."

post-2-0-32761000-1445188808_thumb.png

When Data said, "The odds favor standing pat" during the blackjack game, he was wrong - taking a card was the correct decision. Later on, when Data was shooting craps (pictured in the quoted post), Riker said, "... the probability of rolling a six is no greater than that of rolling a seven." While technically true, this sentence is, at best, awkwardly phrased: The probability of rolling a six is absolutely *less* than that of rolling a seven (who the heck fact-checked this episode?!)

post-2-0-02296700-1445189010_thumb.png

I also wonder if they had fun using the name "Mickey D" for the Mickey Spillane-inspired tough guy.  :)

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I'm guessing the exact same thing that allows the transporter to screen out pathogens from an incoming person and detect and disarm weapons would also allow it to change "metal at near-absolute zero temperature" to room temperature as well.

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I'm guessing the exact same thing that allows the transporter to screen out pathogens from an incoming person and detect and disarm weapons would also allow it to change "metal at near-absolute zero temperature" to room temperature as well.

Did you hear about the guy who got cooled to Absolute Zero?

He's 0K now.

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Star Trek: The Next Generation - Season 3

4. "Who Watches The Watchers?" - Oct 16, 1989 -post-2-0-53063300-1447528659_thumb.png  <-- "I wish you good journeys, Picard. Remember my people." "Always."

Directed by Robert Wiemer, Written by Richard Manning and Hans Beimler, startrek.com

I picked "Who Watches The Watchers" somewhat randomly - it was the first episode I saw, while browsing, that I didn't remember. I've watched all episodes within the past couple of years, so all I needed was my memory jogged by more than just the picture, and I ended up watching it a second time (any post I begin about any individual episode will most likely be because I watched it again).

This was a good, not great, episode, full of flaws and holes, and one which makes the viewer question just how seriously The Federation takes the Prime Directive in reality. Certainly, as an overriding principle, it is revered, but when it comes down to life-or-death situations, it isn't always so easy (though Picard, in this episode, makes it clear - beyond any doubt - that he's willing to give up his life for it).

SPOILERS FOLLOW ----------

I'm a bit troubled by why Star Fleet would have an observation station hidden in order to observe a society evolve. I mean, what if two people come up next to the (hidden) station and start having sex? That just doesn't seem right or fair, at least not to me.

I've always been amazed at how quickly the ship's physicians are able to surgically alter the appearances of crew members in order to blend in with alien races - I'm sure it's longer, but it seems like it's always done in a matter of hours, and that it's no big deal.

"Who Watches The Watchers" is important because it depicts an evolving (but still at the Bronze Age point of evolution), very logical society that features very strong, very logical female leaders. Star Trek TNG was always strong when it came to empowering women, and they never did it in a way that throws it in guys' faces, so it's well-received by all viewers. Long term, I think this is certainly one of the things about this series that will bear out to be important.

The farewell scene pictured above was *really* a farewell scene - not only would it be the final time the two would see each other ever again; there would be absolutely *no contact* between the civilizations ever again. Or at least, that's what's implied - that is one serious farewell.

I keep hoping others will chime in with their opinions, but I don't seem to be having much luck. (The entire series is free for Amazon Prime members, btw.)

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I really liked that episode. That's the one with 'The Picard' right?  And I had NO IDEA that the whole series is on Amazon Prime. WOOHOO!

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I really liked that episode. That's the one with 'The Picard' right?  And I had NO IDEA that the whole series is on Amazon Prime. WOOHOO!

Yes, it's the one with "The Picard" - that name is funny. This also just reminded me of "Time's Arrow" (Season 5, Episode 26), where they go back to the old west, meet Mark Twain, etc., and have a feisty Irish landlady who calls him (with her arms folded) "Mr. Pickard."

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On 6/14/2014 at 10:41 PM, DonRocks said:

Star Trek: The Next Generation - Season 7

24. & 25. "All Good Things" - May 23, 1994 - 

I'm sure a lot of people watched the series finale - one thing about it has always bothered me. 

*** SPOILER ALERT ***

Thanks to Q, there are three different time periods occurring simultaneously, and the one I have the biggest problem with is the earliest one, when Picard is a brand new Captain, meeting his crew for the very first time.

Somehow, some way, he convinces his crew to make what is essentially a suicide run, and although they question it, they also willingly go through with it. I just cannot imagine that they would have done this, rather than to question the new captain's sanity, and to put it bluntly, to relieve the captain of duty - by mutiny if necessary.

That's the one part of this (otherwise magnificent) episode that just doesn't mesh with human nature, and doesn't sit well with me. Did anyone else have this reaction? 

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The answer to why he convinced them to go on a suicide run is partly based in the fact that the original 1701D wasn't a 'family' ship yet.  Remember, in early drafts of the series' canon/scripts, the Ferengi were going to be the new "Klingons."

I kind of liked early Picard in some respects (paraphrasing, of course): "Get that fuckin' kid off my bridge!  He's Beverly and Jack's son?  Hmm...okay...  Boy?  Would you ~kindly~ get the fuck off my bridge!"

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19 hours ago, DonRocks said:

Did people know that Majal Barrett is the voice of the Enterprise computer? I don't think I ever heard this before, although given her Star Trek ubiquity, who knows?

Yes. It’s true!

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